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Pedaling Fool
11-08-2009, 10:39
Anyone ever try speed/race walking?

Iíve been trying it on my treadmill and itís tough; I can get my HR just as high as when jogging. But what makes it hard is that it just feels unnatural, very hard to walk fast (as fast as you can) and not be tempted to start jogging. The typical non-professional race at between 8 Ė 16 minutes per mile, with most in the 11 Ė 13 minute-per-mile range.

Iíve looked up some stats and was surprised at how fast some can walk.

I donít know if these records still stand, but it gives you an idea:



Denis Gennadyevich Nizhegorodov (Russian race walker and current world record holder in the 50 km (31 miles) racewalk, with a time of 3:34:14.


On September 29, 2007 Kanaykin set a new world record for the 20 km (12.4 miles) race walk. He walked a time of 1 hour, 17 minutes, 16 seconds.


The men's American indoor record for race walking a mile is 5 minutes and 38 seconds.


In setting the men's world racewalking record for 50 kilometers (31 miles), the record holder averaged walking faster than 7:08 minutes per mile for over 31 miles. At that pace one could complete a marathon in just over 3 hrs.

emerald
11-08-2009, 11:06
Last year on an inclined treadmill while taking a timed stress test, I topped out at just over 5 MPH before I decided to run instead.

I was surprised I could walk that fast on a treadmill while hooked up to a bunch of equipment, can't imagine someone walking at the faster rates quoted above and would like to see it.

I've wondered what the upper limits might be and expected they far exceed anything I've ever done. Thanks for posting the information.

Pacific Tortuga
11-08-2009, 12:10
How fast can you walk ?

Leaving NOC, slow and steady, 1 & 1/2 miles per

Heading into Damascus, 4 to 5 miles per

Going to a AYCE that closes in a half hour or Dot's, what's the fastest without breaking into a gallop ?

Coming from one with, 'Tortuga' in the name, would be a good indicator too.

Dogwood
11-08-2009, 12:41
How fast can you walk?

4.72 mph sustained on level established trail toting a 25 lb pack.

Feral Bill
11-08-2009, 13:53
Considerably faster than I'm willing to.

Mags
11-09-2009, 02:41
I walk fast enough to get to the AYCE Indian food buffet after a long day of hiking.

Saag never tastes so good....

rickb
11-09-2009, 07:47
The typical non-professional race at between 8 Ė 16 minutes per mile, with most in the 11 Ė 13 minute-per-mile range.


Minutes per mile or MPH? I think you might have flipped things around.

rickb
11-09-2009, 07:54
My bad. That makes sense for speed walking on a track. 7.5 MPH would be fast!

Marta
11-09-2009, 08:02
...The typical non-professional race at between 8 Ė 16 minutes per mile, with most in the 11 Ė 13 minute-per-mile range.



Denis Gennadyevich Nizhegorodov (Russian race walker and current world record holder in the 50 km (31 miles) racewalk, with a time of 3:34:14.
In setting the men's world racewalking record for 50 kilometers (31 miles), the record holder averaged walking faster than 7:08 minutes per mile for over 31 miles. At that pace one could complete a marathon in just over 3 hrs.



Minutes per mile or MPH? I think you might have flipped things around.

No, I think he's talking minutes per mile. Nizhegorodov walked 6.9 minutes per mile in his 50k record, or 8.9 mph.

A fairly rapid, but normal, walk around the neighborhood would net me about 4 miles in an hour, which turns into 4 mph, or 15 minutes per mile.

beakerman
11-09-2009, 11:03
It depends on what's chasing me

With out a "heavy" pack (day hiking) i can clock around 4.5mph on decent ground.

John B
11-09-2009, 14:26
"Running on the Sun," which is a documentary about the Badwater Ultramarathon, focuses on several of the participants, one of whom (Adam Bookspan) is a speed walker. He pointed out that he is quite competitive with runners in ultras -- the longer the race, the more competitive he is. While I don't know of any he's won, still he's ranked near the top in many. For those who have mastered the technique, they can certainly fly.

fredmugs
11-10-2009, 11:07
I'm not sure what's worse: AYCE Indian food or the thread I just read about spam.


I walk fast enough to get to the AYCE Indian food buffet after a long day of hiking.

Saag never tastes so good....

ShelterLeopard
11-10-2009, 13:32
Hmmm- how fast can I walk? That all depends... On a group hike in the hundred mile wilderness, (as a somewhat noveau hiker) I did about 2 miles per hour, but when it was time for our midpoint resupply, my friend and I did six miles in 1 hour, 5 minutes. But, I was unusually energized, hungry, and had no food in my pack to weigh me down. We booked it. But, my pack was still heavy.

So I was durned proud of that!

Of course, after gorging and filling our packs with food, we might have average 1.5 miles and hour. Might.

ShelterLeopard
11-10-2009, 13:32
"averaged", not might have average.

Mags
11-10-2009, 13:39
I'm not sure what's worse: AYCE Indian food or the thread I just read about spam.


I see you live in the mid-West. May explain why you like boring food. :p

A-Train
11-10-2009, 16:37
I'm not sure what's worse: AYCE Indian food or the thread I just read about spam.

If you ever find yourself in Burlington VT on a Sunday go directly to Shalimar of India. You can thank me later :)

neighbor dave
11-10-2009, 16:59
tandori, yum!

Pedaling Fool
11-13-2009, 16:37
Iíve noticed that as I practice speed walking other muscles in my body are being stressed like never before. Which got me thinking that if I continue to speed walk will that improve my running time? In the same way that you strengthen back muscles if you want to increase the amount of weight you can bench press. Which is kind of counter-intuitive, because when you bench press you feel it primarily in the triceps and chest muscles.

When I run I feel it primarily in the quads, but after walking (at an uncomfortable pace), I feel it in the calves (which is strange because I got really strong calves from running on soft sand). However, mostly I feel it in the back of the legs, since Iím kind of pulling my body forward, vice bouncing forward.

Too soon to tell, but I can say now that thereís a world of difference between walking as a form of exercise, vice speed walking. The two activities seem to be completely unrelated and I still struggle with maintaining a fast walk without switching to a comfortable jog -- it just seems so natural to start jogging.

Fast walking just seems to be so unnatural. By fast I mean much faster than your natural pace, but not so fast as to get your HR near redline and maintain that for a good time.

JAK
12-13-2009, 19:16
About 5mph before I really need to break into a run.

Its fun to play around with a heart-rate monitor over a measured distance, to compare the effort of walking and running at different speeds. Over smooth level ground there seems to be a gap in the transition from walking to running, where both walking and running are inefficient. For me, at my current weight, it is somewhere between 10 and 13 minutes per mile. I am not sure if weight matters so much as height. Where weight does matter is how this transition gap translates to the duration of a run/walk. At 200 pounds I can maintain 10 minutes per mile for maybe 15/20 miles, flat sooth ground. On trails it would be considerably less. So depending on my body weight, plus stuff carried, and terrain, there is a distance, of up to say 2 hours, where I might be able to run continuously, and another distance, say beyond 10 hours, where I might have to do it all walking, and so in between I should, in theory, be able to mix it up a little.

For what its worth, I use my heart rate monitor as follows:
Energy expenditure = (MaxHR - HR) / ((MaxHR - RestingHR)

It really only applies to speeds slower than your 12 minute pace.
Also, it gets thrown off if you do some hard running, or hard hills, then slow down.
Also, beyond an hour of slow running, of 2 hours of walking, the HR creeps up some.
Still, I think its fairly accurate for a steady 30-60 minute walk or run over flat ground.

Graywolf
12-16-2009, 15:48
I only walk as fast as my legs will go, and run only as fast as my legs will go, no faster, no slower...:D

But since I really do not run that much, my walking speed averages 4 miles an hour...

If that helps...

Graywolf

JAK
12-17-2009, 17:40
That's a very good point by Graywolf. Stay with your feet.

Tuckahoe64
12-17-2009, 18:44
On my last hike I averaged 1 1/3 miles per hour over 8 miles.

Day before yesterday I walked the 7 miles to work in two hours, or about 3 1/2 miles per hour.

warraghiyagey
12-17-2009, 19:43
I just enjoy the trail as it comes to me. . . never even think about m.p.h. . . :sun

mweinstone
12-17-2009, 19:50
you left right?

warraghiyagey
12-17-2009, 19:52
correct. . . I mean right. . . . . I mean left. . . . . wait. . . . . . what was the question? . . . :confused:

saimyoji
12-17-2009, 21:32
correct. . . I mean right. . . . . I mean left. . . . . wait. . . . . . what was the question? . . . :confused:

well, the answer if 42, if that helps any. :)

tintin
12-19-2009, 05:51
The following is for good terrain:

When strolling we tend to walk at around 1.25mph.

When leading groups - the general rule of thumb I try to go by to plan a hike is an average pace of 4kmh (roughly 2.5mph) with 1 minute added for every 10ft of elevation. It's a good steady pace. A pace of close to 4mph is considered military pace - really only reasonable for someone who is walking fit and hikes regularly (exceptions to this of course)... so someone a month or so into a thru-hike.

Just Dan
12-19-2009, 12:01
Is there a Pizza Hut at the finish line?

JAK
12-26-2009, 16:25
It is surprising how much a small amount of snow can slow you down.
But then huge amounts of snow can be easy, as long as you stay on top of it.

Mags
12-26-2009, 18:39
It is surprising how much a small amount of snow can slow you down.


That's why the Good Lord invented skis... ;)

Rockhound
12-26-2009, 19:05
Speed walking = apples Hiking = oranges

Mags
12-26-2009, 19:31
Speed walking = apples Hiking = oranges

Speed hiking = ???? :D

RockDoc
09-23-2010, 14:43
The speed comes down the farther you go.
Anyone can go 4 mph+ for a short time on a flat surface, but try to keep it up for 4 or 5 hours. With stops and walking the speed generally comes down to under 3 mph, if you are carrying a pack, or if the terrain is hilly.
My ultramarathon speeds for 50k and 50m generally fall between 3 and 4 mph, although I'm a gray haired old geezer happy to be able to cover any ground at all.
Recently did the Devil's Backbone 50 in Montana in 15 hrs, that's 3.3 mph. Sort of an ummm interesting course...
But at my slow pace I was able to run/speedhike the 94 mi Wonderland trail in 3 days, with no problems. The hours that you put count just as much as the speed.