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  1. #1
    Registered User neo's Avatar
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    Default hiking with type 2 diabetes

    i saw my doctor at the diabetic clinic today,he said he was proud of me and that i was in the very top of the 10 % paitents that do recover and live well,he said 90 % do not comply,he cut my amaryl from 8 mg to 4 mg a day
    and on hikes try to reduce it to 2 mg a day,he reduced my lantus insulin and i may be coming off it in the future neo

  2. #2
    Doting Membrane Skidsteer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by neo
    i saw my doctor at the diabetic clinic today,he said he was proud of me and that i was in the very top of the 10 % paitents that do recover and live well,he said 90 % do not comply,he cut my amaryl from 8 mg to 4 mg a day
    and on hikes try to reduce it to 2 mg a day,he reduced my lantus insulin and i may be coming off it in the future neo
    Nothing like a little good news to start the new year! Happy for you.
    Skids

    Insanity: Asking about inseams over and over again and expecting different results.
    Albert Einstein, (attributed)

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    Lazy Daze Zzzzdyd's Avatar
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    Talking I also have Type 2 .....

    Thanks for your post. This is very encouraging news.

    I am on Glipzide, between 2 1/2 and 5 mg. a day.

    This has been the only concern I haven't ask about, and/or resolved thus
    far.

    Horrible blisters that were not going to heal because of the Type 2 took
    me off my thru hike in '98. Pretty sure I have that problem fixed now.


    Do you carry your Glucose checker with you ?

    I think I will carry mine full time the first few weeks, then put in my
    bump box if my levels seem fairly stable.

    I am currently using a Accu-Chek, Advantage(Kit wgts 8oz's) the DVA gave me, but I am
    thinking I will visit Walgrens, etc and see what's new in small lightweight
    models. I have seen some on TV adds that look real small and I imagine
    must not weigh much at all I am thinking.
    Some Days Your The Bug , Some Days Your The Windshield

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    Registered User betic4lyf's Avatar
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    just some advice. for insulin, unless freakishly thin, 1/2" needles hurt less then quarters. they get below the nerve endings.

  5. #5
    Registered User neo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by betic4lyf
    just some advice. for insulin, unless freakishly thin, 1/2" needles hurt less then quarters. they get below the nerve endings.

    this is what i use neo

    http://www.opticlik.com/home.do

  6. #6
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    Default hiking with type 2 diabetes

    this could be an interesting and informative thread...I used to take oral medications ( Orinase, Tolbutamide, Glipazide, etc.) and was always going hypoglycemic on the trail. Every 45 or 50 minutes would have to stop and eat dried fruit or other sugary stuff to raise blood sugars up. And would then often go unpredictably high, especially at night in camp. Not good for the bod to be up at 200 plus. Now am controlling the disease with only a lowcarb diet...and I find that I can keep blood sugar levels very stable and just about right on the trail, BUT, the big BUT, is that I must go very slowly. And I cannot take anything for "quick energy." A handful of dried fruit, now, without insulin-producing meds, just shoots me up to high levels, without adding any "zip." So I just go slowly...walk about 2 to 2 1/2 miles, rest for a bit, then do it again. Eat a normal meal every 4 or 5 hours. Can do this all day. But cannot do any super-sugar fueled sprints up a mountain pass. I suspect insulin would enable me to use sugar as fuel...but as long as I can knock off 18 mile days without having to carry meds, I am pretty happy. We diabetics don't have a normal metabolism, not by a long sight. Glad to be able to ramble, though... Bill

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    Registered User neo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alalskaman
    this could be an interesting and informative thread...I used to take oral medications ( Orinase, Tolbutamide, Glipazide, etc.) and was always going hypoglycemic on the trail. Every 45 or 50 minutes would have to stop and eat dried fruit or other sugary stuff to raise blood sugars up. And would then often go unpredictably high, especially at night in camp. Not good for the bod to be up at 200 plus. Now am controlling the disease with only a lowcarb diet...and I find that I can keep blood sugar levels very stable and just about right on the trail, BUT, the big BUT, is that I must go very slowly. And I cannot take anything for "quick energy." A handful of dried fruit, now, without insulin-producing meds, just shoots me up to high levels, without adding any "zip." So I just go slowly...walk about 2 to 2 1/2 miles, rest for a bit, then do it again. Eat a normal meal every 4 or 5 hours. Can do this all day. But cannot do any super-sugar fueled sprints up a mountain pass. I suspect insulin would enable me to use sugar as fuel...but as long as I can knock off 18 mile days without having to carry meds, I am pretty happy. We diabetics don't have a normal metabolism, not by a long sight. Glad to be able to ramble, though... Bill

    i went from two 4 mg tabs of amaryl a day to 1 mg of amaryl a day
    i also use 10 units once a day of lantus insulin. i eat a meal or a good snack
    every 3 hours,but i hike 20 + miles a day

  8. #8
    Registered User neo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zzzzdyd
    Thanks for your post. This is very encouraging news.

    I am on Glipzide, between 2 1/2 and 5 mg. a day.

    This has been the only concern I haven't ask about, and/or resolved thus
    far.

    Horrible blisters that were not going to heal because of the Type 2 took
    me off my thru hike in '98. Pretty sure I have that problem fixed now.


    Do you carry your Glucose checker with you ?

    I think I will carry mine full time the first few weeks, then put in my
    bump box if my levels seem fairly stable.

    I am currently using a Accu-Chek, Advantage(Kit wgts 8oz's) the DVA gave me, but I am
    thinking I will visit Walgrens, etc and see what's new in small lightweight
    models. I have seen some on TV adds that look real small and I imagine
    must not weigh much at all I am thinking.
    yes i always carry my glucometer,as far as blisters and taking care of your feet go,i take an antibiotic called a moxicillin in case i get blister and infected,i call carry anti fungal cream to prevent athletes feet,what i feel that protect your feet most is wash your feet and clean socksdiabetics must take extra care of their feet neo

  9. #9
    Registered User neo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zzzzdyd
    Thanks for your post. This is very encouraging news.

    I am on Glipzide, between 2 1/2 and 5 mg. a day.

    This has been the only concern I haven't ask about, and/or resolved thus
    far.

    Horrible blisters that were not going to heal because of the Type 2 took
    me off my thru hike in '98. Pretty sure I have that problem fixed now.


    Do you carry your Glucose checker with you ?

    I think I will carry mine full time the first few weeks, then put in my
    bump box if my levels seem fairly stable.

    I am currently using a Accu-Chek, Advantage(Kit wgts 8oz's) the DVA gave me, but I am
    thinking I will visit Walgrens, etc and see what's new in small lightweight
    models. I have seen some on TV adds that look real small and I imagine
    must not weigh much at all I am thinking.
    my kit is small and compact one touch ultra neo

    http://www.lifescan.com/products/meters/ultra/

  10. #10
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    I was chatting with a guy who is a Biological Statistician helping an Endocrinologist develop a new technique to monitor diabetes, and help physicians determine what diabetes medications to prescribe and regimens regarding diet and exercise.

    Stanford University is using a device - similar to the heart monitor - to assess the blood levels of diabetics. The device can record blood-glucose levels as frequently as every three seconds. One thousand test subjects rigorously recorded what they ate, how much they ate, and when they ate, as well as the amount of exercise - as little as walking about the house on up - they received.

    The statistician is working on discerning what all the data mean. He and the endocrinologist are consulting with similar others to develop the medical responses which would be appropriate by private endocrinologists. The goal is to develop formulae, based upon the extensive data which can be collected from each diabetic, which will advise each patient’s endocrinologist fairly specific medications and dosages for that patient. He advised, the theoretical concern which blocks advancement at this time is, diabetics may begin to self medicate and stop further consults with endocrinologists.

    Some interesting asides, which you may already know.

    The profit margin on Blood-Glucose Test Strips is enormous. Blood-Glucose Test Meters are relatively simple devices - one chip and an LED screen - which is why they are so readily given away. If the patient receives a free meter, why shouldn’t he buy the strips?

    My blood-glucose sores after I eat a flour tortilla yet remains fairly stable after eating a corn tortilla. (I intuitively thought this should be the reverse, since corn is “sweeter” than wheat). The difference in blood-glucose response may have a great deal to do with particulate size. Most corn is stone ground, and most wheat is steel ground. Stone grinding makes small particles of the corn. Steel grinding virtually pulverizes wheat. Saliva in your mouth begins to convert organic matter to sugar upon contact. The effect upon powdered wheat flour is virtually an immediate conversion to sugar. The effect upon corn flour isn’t as immediate; the outer portion of the much larger particle is converted, about as quickly as is flour, but a larger portion of the corn flour is not immediately affected. The larger particles of corn flour require more time to convert. The body uses more energy in the conversion process. Less glucose enters the system, and at a slower rate yielding a lower blood-glucose number.

    The youngest Type 2 Diabetic recently identified is a nine year old boy.
    “The earth does not belong to man, man belongs to earth. ...
    Man did not weave the web of life, he is merely a strand in it.
    Whatever he does to the web, he does to himself.”

  11. #11
    Registered User Nate's Avatar
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    GOOD LUCK WITH THAT BROTHER- THE LESSER THE BETTER. I, ON THE OTHER HAND, WILL NEVER AND CAN NEVER STRAY AWAY FROM MY INSULIN NOR MY PUMP. ONE OF YOU GUYS ONCE TOLD ME ONE TIME- AND IT MIGHT EVEN HAVE BEEN YOU- THAT LIFE IS 10 PERCENT WHAT HAPPENS TO YOU AND 90 PERCENT WHAT YOU DO WITH IT- ALWAYS LOOK AT IT THAT WAY.
    NATE

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    Registered User betic4lyf's Avatar
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    freestyle flash meters are really small, moreso than one touch ultras, and get by with less blood. they are very accurate. next time you visit you doctor see if you can get a free meter. they make a killing on the test strips so often they give them to doctors to give to patients. thats how i do it,. also, if you go with pens, i would suggest going with the eli lilly version of whatever insulin ie(humalogv. novolog) because their pens are so much better designed and easier to use, and just more quality. last of all, neo, do use that pen with lantus, cuz that would be awesome.

  13. #13
    Registered User SteveJ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by neo View Post
    i saw my doctor at the diabetic clinic today,he said he was proud of me and that i was in the very top of the 10 % paitents that do recover and live well,he said 90 % do not comply,he cut my amaryl from 8 mg to 4 mg a day
    and on hikes try to reduce it to 2 mg a day,he reduced my lantus insulin and i may be coming off it in the future neo
    Hey, Neo - did you see this?!

    http://www.canada.com/nationalpost/n...b5d1bf&k=63970

    or

    http://tinyurl.com/yxo3bt

    "In a discovery that has stunned even those behind it, scientists at a Toronto hospital say they have proof the body's nervous system helps trigger diabetes, opening the door to a potential near-cure of the disease that affects millions of Canadians."
    Everywhere is walking distance if you have the time.

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vi+ View Post
    I was chatting with a guy who is a Biological Statistician helping an Endocrinologist develop a new technique to monitor diabetes, and help physicians determine what diabetes medications to prescribe and regimens regarding diet and exercise.

    Stanford University is using a device - similar to the heart monitor - to assess the blood levels of diabetics. The device can record blood-glucose levels as frequently as every three seconds. One thousand test subjects rigorously recorded what they ate, how much they ate, and when they ate, as well as the amount of exercise - as little as walking about the house on up - they received.

    The statistician is working on discerning what all the data mean. He and the endocrinologist are consulting with similar others to develop the medical responses which would be appropriate by private endocrinologists. The goal is to develop formulae, based upon the extensive data which can be collected from each diabetic, which will advise each patient’s endocrinologist fairly specific medications and dosages for that patient. He advised, the theoretical concern which blocks advancement at this time is, diabetics may begin to self medicate and stop further consults with endocrinologists.

    Some interesting asides, which you may already know.

    The profit margin on Blood-Glucose Test Strips is enormous. Blood-Glucose Test Meters are relatively simple devices - one chip and an LED screen - which is why they are so readily given away. If the patient receives a free meter, why shouldn’t he buy the strips?

    My blood-glucose sores after I eat a flour tortilla yet remains fairly stable after eating a corn tortilla. (I intuitively thought this should be the reverse, since corn is “sweeter” than wheat). The difference in blood-glucose response may have a great deal to do with particulate size. Most corn is stone ground, and most wheat is steel ground. Stone grinding makes small particles of the corn. Steel grinding virtually pulverizes wheat. Saliva in your mouth begins to convert organic matter to sugar upon contact. The effect upon powdered wheat flour is virtually an immediate conversion to sugar. The effect upon corn flour isn’t as immediate; the outer portion of the much larger particle is converted, about as quickly as is flour, but a larger portion of the corn flour is not immediately affected. The larger particles of corn flour require more time to convert. The body uses more energy in the conversion process. Less glucose enters the system, and at a slower rate yielding a lower blood-glucose number.

    The youngest Type 2 Diabetic recently identified is a nine year old boy.


    sugar content has an impact but more importantly is time and effort for digestion ie: amount of insulin used for a given food.
    although i am not a diabetic, i have been a paramedic for 30 years and admire diabetic hikers greatly. it is amazing what you have to deal with and tolerate just to enjoy the same things that us non-diabetics enjoy.
    i know that you get highly tuned into what your body is telling you 24/7 but i couldn't imagine hiking w/o a gluecometer.
    good luck to you all, you are an impressive group.
    geek

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