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  1. #1
    Chenango's Avatar
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    Question Candle Lanterns - cleaning wax from glass

    I really like my candle lantern (awesome in the wind), but is a pain to clean wax from the glass. It does not get on there often, but occasionally I drop the lantern and it gets on the glass.

    Any suggestions for getting wax off of glass?
    You are never too old.

  2. #2
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    Maybe placing the glass in a pot of boiling water? I don't know, I don't use them. I have one but i don't use it.
    Hokey Pokey

  3. #3
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    I've removed the wax with hot running water and paper towel, but in the field I think the trick is to be careful when you blow it out. You could light it, let the candle heat it up, and then get at it with some toilet paper before it cools down too much.

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    I have one also but I stopped using it just because of that problem. One of my freinds has a small latern that screws onto his fuel canister of his pocket rocket stove. It works great and it put off ALOT of light.

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    It's true that a small candle lantern doesn't have quite enough light for reading, even if you keep it clean, which isn't that hard really. I might try a 3 wick candle lantern someday, as I think that might also be enough heat for steeping tea.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hikerhead View Post
    Maybe placing the glass in a pot of boiling water? I don't know, I don't use them. I have one but i don't use it.
    My wife is really into candles. She is always microwaving glass containers with some water in them to get the wax out. So yes, boiling water.
    "If I get started in the right direction, I just might get to where I want to go." -- Tab Benoit

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    Registered User BigBlue's Avatar
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    I have a couple of Candle Lanterns and love 'em, as for wax on the glass hot water and a soapy sponge works well. Never bought them hiking I didn't want the extra weight but they're great for camping.

  8. #8

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    Back in the old days I used a pitiful little candle lantern with the round glass in a light metal tube. Sounds simple. But the dang thing had a spring below the candle platform which pushed the candle up as it burned. Looked good on paper, useless in the field. The hot wax frequently dripped down and into the spring unit and dried solid, nearly impossible to clean except by tossing in a fire . . . and leaving it.

    My system now is much better: A blue plastic bottom to a Carmex lip balm container. Melt a few drops in the bottom and place candle. It's an open flame, though. AN OPEN FLAME IN A TENT!! Relax, I took the open flame certification course offered by the higher council of forest tenting options, etc.
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    BARN OWLS (UK) Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    Tipi that's just




    The previous boiled in water is correct, we frequently put holders in the dishwasher with excellent results. And Tipi I am just tickled that you would use a candle in a tent like that. I wouldn't want a hole in my sleeping bag though.
    “You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose. You're on your own. And you know what you know. And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go...” Dr Seuss
    Woo

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by JAK View Post
    It's true that a small candle lantern doesn't have quite enough light for reading.
    But it did ... thirty years ago.

  11. #11
    Registered User Toolshed's Avatar
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    Hot water and used dryer sheets (which I also save for remving wax on my skis.)
    You can give a light touch of brake cleaner if you really needed it, but the hot water is the trick.
    .....Someday, like many others who joined WB in the early years, I may dry up and dissapear....

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    Registered User BackTrack1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chenango View Post
    I really like my candle lantern (awesome in the wind), but is a pain to clean wax from the glass. It does not get on there often, but occasionally I drop the lantern and it gets on the glass.

    Any suggestions for getting wax off of glass?
    Try mixing some ashes and some water together then rubbing it on the glass with a rag, then rinse, should work well, it did for me.

  13. #13

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    BTW, candle type and quality is also important. The best candles I have found for "backpacking" and burning inside a tent are Shabbat Candles put out by Manischewitz and available in most grocery stores, of all places.

    Four inches tall, burn 3 hours, made with pure paraffin wax. These babies burn good and only drip if exposed to the wind yet put out a decent amount of light. A must have in the winter as an open flame keeps my fingers warm when it's frigid.

  14. #14
    Mrs Gorp
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    Default Try the Freezer first

    Put the lantern in the freezer for 2 to 3 hrs or overnight, once the wax is frozen it should pop off with a wooden popsicle stick. Remove any leftover wax residue with soapy hot water. G00-GONE® (a solvent that smells like citrus but has a base of petroleum distillates) helps to dissolve the stickiness.
    MrsGorp

  15. #15
    Chenango's Avatar
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    Thanks for all your help. Hot water and paper towels did the trick.
    You are never too old.

  16. #16
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    I am a little bit of a pyro but I would be afraid of the heat or fire ruining gear or lighting the synthetics I was wearing on fire with a candle. Sleep seems to sneak up on you the older you get.

    Lastly (grahm weenie thought) a 3 hour candle weighs the same as a 50-100 hour LED headlight setup with batteries.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Toolshed View Post
    Hot water and used dryer sheets (which I also save for remving wax on my skis.)
    Used dryer sheets have lots of recycl-ability, it seems. I put them into my hiking boots when I get home. As a result, my boots exude the odor of freshly-washed linens ... instead of 3-day old trenchfoot.

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    Four inches tall, burn 3 hours, made with pure paraffin wax.
    You can also make your own candles of this type with the paraffin you find in the canning aisle of most grocery stores. For wick, use any thin cotton rope.

  19. #19
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    100% beeswax is excellent also. I got a box of Eastern Orthadox Candles at Marden's in Maine very cheap, and still have half the box. They are the same amount as a tealight at 1/2 oz each, but are 4" tall and thin and good for lighting my Kelly Kettle. I can also melt them down to a tealight candle for my lantern, but usually just bring a tealight. I've noticed some of the bulk tealight candles are pretty sketchy though. I think 100% beeswax of 100% paraffin, as long as you know what your getting, or even cheap tealights as long as you test them and they work. Some are ok.

  20. #20
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    The other think I like about the beeswax is that it has other uses, like zippers, or mixing it with some vegetable oil for some lip balm or something like that. Feels good on the fingers just as it is, but I'm not sure how much rubs off that way or if it does any good.

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