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  1. #1
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    Default Caldera Clone--how to make your own

    I don't really want to spend the money for a Caldera Cone, especially since it's only good for one pot size. So I think I'll make my own.

    Googling got me to a good paper pattern for cutting one out. See the thread here:

    http://www.outdoorsmagic.com/forum/f...0/cp/1/v/8/sp/

    There's a bit of computer homework involved, but it's not too hard. You can print out a paper pattern after you input the dimensions for your stove & pot. So far I haven't got a full size pattern printed yet--still have to deal with translating from European paper sizes to my printer. But that's part of the diy-ness of this project.

    I plan to make what the pattern-program-writer calls a "Caldera Clone" for my old 2-qt pot and one for the AGG 3 cup pot I'm getting.

    There's another method here:

    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/s...hlight=caldera

    Have fun with them.

    Doug

  2. #2
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    Default

    And another way of doing it..
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VerP7-aiEBw
    Franco

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Franco View Post
    And another way of doing it..
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VerP7-aiEBw
    Franco
    Correct--that's the video by the guy on the hammockforums. There is discussion about it at the thread there I linked to.

    Doug

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    Quote Originally Posted by sierraDoug View Post
    I don't really want to spend the money for a Caldera Cone, especially since it's only good for one pot size. So I think I'll make my own.

    Googling got me to a good paper pattern for cutting one out. See the thread here:

    http://www.outdoorsmagic.com/forum/f...0/cp/1/v/8/sp/


    So far, so good. I just have to cut it out of the flashing.

  5. #5

    Default Computers!, I don't need no stinking Computers!

    Also made a Caldera Cone over the weekend using the Youtube video.

    Came out pretty well.

    I work with computers during the week. It was nice to do it the old fashioned way.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VerP7...e=channel_page

    I think this is the same link as on hammock forums mentioned above.

  6. #6

  7. #7
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    I wouldn't mind paying retail for a Caldera Cone, but I want to stick with my Zelph's Starlyte.

    I wonder if the stock version of the Snow Peak 700 or 600 Caldera Cone would be the appropriate height for a Starlyte?

  8. #8
    Doting Membrane Skidsteer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by coldspring View Post
    I wouldn't mind paying retail for a Caldera Cone, but I want to stick with my Zelph's Starlyte.

    I wonder if the stock version of the Snow Peak 700 or 600 Caldera Cone would be the appropriate height for a Starlyte?
    It would be a bit tall for the Starlyte. IOW the Starlyte is a shorter stove than the stove that comes with a Caldera Cone and the included stove, IMO, is more suited to a greater 'stove to pot' distance as well.

    You could always shim the Starlyte up with something to make up the difference.
    Skids

    Insanity: Asking about inseams over and over again and expecting different results.
    Albert Einstein, (attributed)

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skidsteer View Post
    It would be a bit tall for the Starlyte. IOW the Starlyte is a shorter stove than the stove that comes with a Caldera Cone and the included stove, IMO, is more suited to a greater 'stove to pot' distance as well.

    You could always shim the Starlyte up with something to make up the difference.
    Well, I bought a Caldera Cone for my Snow Peak 700. I trimmed 1" off the bottom to lower the pot closer to the Starlyte. I haven't drilled any ventilation holes around the bottom of the cone yet. I wonder if the Starlyte would need more or less ventilation than the 12-10?

    The Starlyte, Cone, and Cook Pot are right at 5 oz. It's fast to.

  10. #10
    Hiker Trash Downhill Trucker's Avatar
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    Coldspring, would you mind posting a pic of your system when you are done? Many thanks!

  11. #11

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    Hello everyone. Glad to see my Caldera Clone script is getting some use; thanks to sierraDoug for posting details here.

    Just a quick comment on the YouTube video that Franco posted; it's a great video, and shows a good way of making a Clone, but, like other examples of this method I've seen on the internet, it's not quite correct, in that the resulting cone won't be quite as the design intended.

    The problem is that he measures the two radii from the apex to the vertical intersections of the 'cone design' (the black lines). This means that the side wall of the cone is too short.

    It's a simple problem to fix; measure the radii from the apex to the intersections of the top line and the base line with the red lines of the cone design. This will ensure that the side wall of the cone is the correct height, and make the resulting cone closer the the design intent.

    Granted, the difference is only small (a few millimetres, usually), but I like things to come out the way I intend them to come out...

    My Clone template (nice example from lustreking) uses a different geometric approach, but the result is the same.

  12. #12

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    Okay I'm using my dumb question coupon of the week:

    Why use a conical windscreen instead of a cylindrical windscreen?

  13. #13
    Hike smarter, not harder.
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    Strength and stability
    Con men understand that their job is not to use facts to convince skeptics but to use words to help the gullible to believe what they want to believe - Thomas Sowell

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by captain paranoia View Post
    Just a quick comment on the YouTube video that Franco posted; it's a great video, and shows a good way of making a Clone, but, like other examples of this method I've seen on the internet, it's not quite correct, in that the resulting cone won't be quite as the design intended.


    Granted, the difference is only small (a few millimetres, usually), but I like things to come out the way I intend them to come out...

    .
    It's the engineer in you

    Quick question for you, does a conical have more strength than a cylindrical pot/pan support equal to the largest outside diameter?

    Example: Squeezebox having the same OD as a Caldera type with OD at it's base being equal to OD of Squeezebox? (you know what I mean)

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by skinewmexico View Post
    Strength and stability
    Ah thanks, it's a potstand/windscreen in one, gotcha!

  16. #16

    Default How strong does it need to be?

    Quote Originally Posted by zelph View Post
    It's the engineer in you
    Indeed... ;-)

    > Quick question for you, does a conical have more strength than a cylindrical pot/pan support equal to the largest outside diameter?

    Quick answer: It depends...

    Long answer:

    A Clone is probably more stable, since the conic shape is hard to topple or deform by tipping. A simple cylinder tends to deform much more easily. Think of the cone as a 'round triangle', and then remember that the corners of a triangle cannot move, unlike the corners of a square object.

    It terms of loading from the top, that's a tricky one. If you place a load on a Clone, since the sides are angled, it will cause an outward force, as well as a downward force. This may cause the Clone to open up, either by opening a mitre joint, or by tearing a tabbed joint. Even if this doesn't happen, the sides are likely to collapse eventually, since they're only thin foil, and there's only so much strength that the gently curved edge can provide.

    If you place a similar load on the Squeezebox, you will only get a vertical loading, since its sides are only vertical. Those folded triangular sections make the sides rigid, and less likely to deform under load. On the other hand, the contact areas that support the pan are quite small, so these will probably collapse first. But, overall, I'd suggest that the SqueezeBox is stronger than a Clone in this respect.

    Then there's the issue of side impacts. I'd suggest that a simple cylindrical windshield is weakest, since there's only a simple curve, then a Clone, being profiled in two directions, and finally, the Squeezebox, due to all those folded reinforcements.

    However, both the Clone and the Squeezebox are more than strong enough to support a pan of water, and both are stable enough, too. A simple cylinder would have to be made of more robust material to provide equivalent support and stability, I think (stability comes partly from the shape and centre of gravity of the thing, and partly from the stiffness of the material used to make it). If I were trying to optimise the weight of the thing, I'd have to do some proper design analysis, or practical tests, but both items are light enough for me, and I don't like destruction testing things I've made; I prefer to use them instead...

    Just don't stand on any of these things, or kick them about your campsite...

  17. #17
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    Well, after a year or so I've finally made a couple Caldera clones. One is for an Antigravity Gear 3 cup pot.

    The other is for a 12oz Heineken beer can pot. Since I only need to boil 1.25 cups water for a freezer bag dinner for one, this is my idea for solo cooking. The can is sturdier than a Coke can. And I used a (youth size) LiveStrong silicone wrist band to sit on the cone. Like the bands the real Caldera Cones come with for beer can pots.

    For more info you can read the Caldera clone thread at:
    http://www.outdoorsmagic.com/forum/f...p/21/v/1/sp/,,

    If you've thought about making a cone, go for it. It's a great project!



  18. #18
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    I've made 2 cones. One for a foster's can set and the other for my Halulite microdualist from GSI.

    The fosters can was my first, and I have to admit a bit rickety. fortunately though its super compact and the entire setup good for 2 people with utensils and 3 oz alcohol is right under 9 oz.

    The GSI setup is quite large, but its much nicer. I managed to boil 2 cups of water with under an ounce of alch in 4 minutes (almost as fast as the pocket rocket)

  19. #19
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    Muledeer - Did you use a silicone band around the Foster's can to hold it on the cone, like the official cone does?

    Also, did you use Captain Paranoia's postscript file or just draw out the cone yourself?

    I haven't taken my MiniHeinie into the wilds yet. In two weeks though I'll be using it in Yosemite.

  20. #20
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    For those that may want to try their hand at this, there's a handy little template maker that you can use along with the YouTube video to make it easier.

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