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  1. #1

    Default Dehydrating tuna?

    I searched but did not find an answer.
    I have tuna-in-oil and tuna-in-water in foil packages -
    I would love to be able to dry tuna. I have a 12 year old American Harvest that works beautifully - except it does not have temperture settings - it just dries at a "warm temperature" all the time. One setting, I guess it would be called.

    Might as well ask this as well - can butter be dehydrated?

  2. #2
    Doting Membrane Skidsteer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtBagger View Post
    I searched but did not find an answer.
    I have tuna-in-oil and tuna-in-water in foil packages -
    I would love to be able to dry tuna. I have a 12 year old American Harvest that works beautifully - except it does not have temperture settings - it just dries at a "warm temperature" all the time. One setting, I guess it would be called.

    Might as well ask this as well - can butter be dehydrated?
    I've dehydrated tuna often enough in recipes that call for it. Always seemed to work out fine.

    Butter? Don't know about that. Fats don't dry very well.
    Skids

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  3. #3

    Default I bailed on it for now

    I am drying ground beef this time. Along with pinto beans that have been in the croc pot all cooking. I did some more searching and still did not find a post where someone just dumped a can of tuna on the fruit roll tray and let it dehydrate. I am sure it has been done and I will try it eventually. Right now I have stuff all the kitchen - my hands are full getting next weeks menu all dryed out.

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    AT 4,000 miler, LT Blissful's Avatar
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    Maybe try butter buds if you want flavor.



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  5. #5

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    Stinky kitchen.

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    Section Hiker Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtBagger View Post
    I searched but did not find an answer.
    I have tuna-in-oil and tuna-in-water in foil packages -
    I would love to be able to dry tuna. I have a 12 year old American Harvest that works beautifully - except it does not have temperture settings - it just dries at a "warm temperature" all the time. One setting, I guess it would be called.

    Might as well ask this as well - can butter be dehydrated?
    How to make ghee (clarified butter) at home

    Materials: 1 pound unsalted butter (organic if available), a large sieve, 4 sheets of cheesecloth or muslin, a dry heavy-bottomed deep pot, a clean dry pot to hold the finished ghee, a clean 1-pound glass jar with lid.
    Step 1. Melt the butter over low heat gradually in the heavy-bottomed pot. Do not stir.
    Step 2. Over low heat, cook the melted butter until it is a clear golden liquid. It may bubble some, and a foam may form on top, but if you have a deep pot it won't boil over. Golden or light brown solids will form and may settle at bottom. You can skim off and discard thick foam if you like.
    Step 3. Remove from heat while the liquid is a clear gold. A darker color means overdone ghee.
    Step 4. Line the sieve with the 4 sheets of cheesecloth and place over the clean dry pot. While still hot, carefully strain the ghee through the cheesecloth-lined sieve into a clean, dry pot.
    Step 5. Transferthe strained ghee carefully into the clean jar and shut tightly.
    Note: Ghee at room temperature looks semi-solid. Ghee does not need to be refrigerated. Always use a clean utensil to scoop out ghee for use.
    “You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose. You're on your own. And you know what you know. And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go...” Dr Seuss
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    Section Hiker Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    You start with 1/2 inch filets not canned tuna fish

    Answer:
    For centuries fishermen in warm climates have turned to drying or curing fish to preserve their catch. The fishermen off the southwest coast of Spain would pack fish in sea salt, and then hang them in the sun to dry. Even though it is not necessary to preserve fish this way with today’s advances in refrigeration and on-board freezers, people still love to eat salted fish. Dried tuna or mojama as it is called in Spanish is considered a delicacy and is produced in the provinces of Huelva and Cadiz in the Atlantic, as well as Valencia, Murcia and Almeria in the Mediterranean. The tradition of drying tuna in Spain goes back many centuries and it is known that the Arabs dried tuna during their reign, calling it musama.
    As the tuna dries, it shrinks. The pale red fish turns a dark reddish-brown and has a firm consistency. You can buy mojama in markets all over Spain. It is sold in chunks by weight. If you do not live in Spain, you can purchase it in vacuum-packed packages at gourmet or ethnic food markets, or over the internet.
    Mojama makes a superb and simple tapa served with sliced bread and toasted almonds or green
    “You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose. You're on your own. And you know what you know. And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go...” Dr Seuss
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    Section Hiker Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    FYI - I don't make ghee I freeze small individual pats or cut it up with a knife as it defrosts. But you asked so there you go.
    “You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose. You're on your own. And you know what you know. And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go...” Dr Seuss
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  9. #9
    Cooking in the Backcountry LaurieAnn's Avatar
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    yes you can dry tuna... it's a little fragrant and use the kind packed in water

    you can't dehydrate butter but you can make butter powder with the addition of tapioca maltodextrin... you can also make olive oil powder, shortening powder, peanut butter powder, almond butter powder and nutella powder this way

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    Section Hiker Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    Woops - Laurie Ann, What were your results with dried can tuna...? Edible or did you reconsititute?

    my memory was from a texture of eating crunchy glass shards.
    “You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose. You're on your own. And you know what you know. And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go...” Dr Seuss
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  11. #11

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    Just have a little KY nearby for your dry tuna.

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    Ouch......
    “You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose. You're on your own. And you know what you know. And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go...” Dr Seuss
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  13. #13
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    Default Its possible, I'm not a kitchen scientist, but...

    Use the type in water. Empty the large can of tuna in a collander. (Cans are cheaper in my store.) Rinse well with cool water. Pat dry. Spread on cookie sheet. Place in oven on 130 -140 degrees. Leave door open at top. You will have to monitor the dryness. 3 large cans usually takes around 4 hours in my oven. I have never eaten it out of the bag. It works good when soaked for 30 minutes in warm water and then added to last 5 minutes of cooking a meal. It has less odor when cooking in the field than tuna fresh out of the pouch, but it also seems to have less flavor. I also find equal amounts of dried compared to fresh to be less filling - this may just be psychosomatic - but I always use more dried in a recipe than I would use fresh (packaged).
    Try adding a spice to it before you put it in oven. I like Old Bay on mine.

    Note -- it will smell up the house.
    Second note -- it is like little shards - it can poke holes in a ziplock when transported. I double bag, scoup out a serving, rehydrate in a pan.

  14. #14
    Registered User toegem's Avatar
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    Dried tuna is one of things that goes with me on all my trips, I'll pre-make tuna salad using tuna in water only and all the other ingredients (excluding the mayo), it is then turned into a puree and dried. Once dried it is returned to a mini food processor where it is powdered which solves the bag punchuring tendencies, the mayo is then added after reconstitution. The tuna comes back quickly with the addition of cold water, it does not make the prettiest sandwich and has the consistency of pate` but does taste good to me. FWIW as LaurieAnn and babbage mentioned dry in a well ventilated area and by itself or with other fish items.
    The journey of 10,000 miles, begins with the first step.

  15. #15

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    Smoke it. Boil it. THEN dehydrate it.

  16. #16

    Question Directions?...

    Quote Originally Posted by LaurieAnn View Post
    you can't dehydrate butter but you can make butter powder with the addition of tapioca maltodextrin... you can also make olive oil powder, shortening powder, peanut butter powder, almond butter powder and nutella powder this way
    Can you give us directions on how to do this? Or post a link?

    (I love that avatar picture of you Laurie...makes you look mysterious! )
    "The most arduous part of learning is preparing the mind to accept new knowledge."
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