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  1. #1
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    Default what is the best tent for bad weather

    What is the better tent, the Gossamer Gear, The One or the Tarp Tent , Rainbow any pros or cons.
    I am looking for something light weight but will stand up to bad weather as well as blood sucking bugs and will hold up for lots of miles

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    I've never slept in either, but it looks (from the statistics, photos, and things I've heard) as though the Gossamer Gear is the way to go. I've heard that it holds up better than the rainbow.
    2010 GA-PA, no. ME
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    Also, just accidentally deleted a whole bunch of unread messages I didn't know existed, if I ever didn't reply to you, I'm sorry! Promise it wasn't on purpose.

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    Registered User Lyle's Avatar
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    I use The One. Had it for a couple of years now. The only thing I don't like about it is that the roof line, sloping to both head and foot, tends to drop heavy condensation right onto your face. Good thing is that this wakes you up, so you can wipe down the inside of the tent.

    This only happens on fairly rare occasions, when condensation problems are very high - cold, very damp, very still night.

    The counterpoint to the above complaint is that the ventilation is fantastic, so that if their is any breeze at all, condensation is virtually non-existent.

    I LOVE the lack of weight and the fact that it provides full protection. Easy to pitch, once you get your method down - watch the videos online, it's not entirely intuitive.

    Good shelter, kept me dry in hard, all-night rains, light snow, and heavy winds. Definitely Recommended.

    I have no personal experience with the Rainbow. From having seen them set up, they strike me as having a very large footprint, and thus could be more difficult to find a place to set up in some situations.

    Another option to consider is the Six Moon Design Lunar (solo or duo). I have a Six Moon Wild Oasis that is a great little (key word) shelter.

  4. #4
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    Default tent option

    You might also look at the Lunar Solo from Six Moons Design. It's light and will keep the bugs off. Similar condensation issues to the others mentioned. Not yet sure about its long-term durability; ask me in September.

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    I almost got the Lunar- but I can't stand the fact that you can't sit up at all. And I love bathtub floors. (I stuck with my old tent- it had everything I need, even though if would make UL hikers flinch)
    2010 GA-PA, no. ME
    2016 to be
    Also, just accidentally deleted a whole bunch of unread messages I didn't know existed, if I ever didn't reply to you, I'm sorry! Promise it wasn't on purpose.

  6. #6
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    I have the Lunar Solo and have it used it for winter AT trips. Encountered wind, rain and wet snow. It's worked fine in all conditions. Really happy with it.
    "If you don't know where you're going...any road will get you there."
    "He who's not busy living is busy dying"

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    Stephenson's Warmlite

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    The best shelter for bad weather is a good hammock with a tarp. That way no water can pour in the sides like it does in a tent... I use a Warbonnet Blackbird with a MacCat tarp.

  9. #9

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    never had a drop of water get into my MSR zoid2

  10. #10
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    The Lunar Solo has a footprint as large as the TT Double Rainbow, so I wouldn't get that unless you're aware of that. I could sit up in my Lunar Solo, so I was surprised to see a previous poster say you couldn't. And you might look into the new Tarptent Moment. Slightly heavier, but nicely evolved.
    Con men understand that their job is not to use facts to convince skeptics but to use words to help the gullible to believe what they want to believe - Thomas Sowell

  11. #11

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    how do the coffin tents compare to the tipi? i would think the steep slope of the tipi wall would shed water and snow alot better.......

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red Hat View Post
    The best shelter for bad weather is a good hammock with a tarp. That way no water can pour in the sides like it does in a tent... I use a Warbonnet Blackbird with a MacCat tarp.
    I have been very close to changing to a hammock for that very reason. (But, I like sleeping on solid ground. For now, anyway.)
    2010 GA-PA, no. ME
    2016 to be
    Also, just accidentally deleted a whole bunch of unread messages I didn't know existed, if I ever didn't reply to you, I'm sorry! Promise it wasn't on purpose.

  13. #13
    Section Hiking Knucklehead Hooch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red Hat View Post
    The best shelter for bad weather is a good hammock with a tarp. That way no water can pour in the sides like it does in a tent... I use a Warbonnet Blackbird with a MacCat tarp.
    Watch out for the hammock haters, Red Hat. But I do agree with you.
    "If you play a Nicleback song backwards, you'll hear messages from the devil. Even worse, if you play it forward, you'll hear Nickleback." - Dave Grohl

  14. #14

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    I'm not a hammock hater (I have an HH, use it occasionally), but I think it depends (among other things) on the anticipated overall weather --- not just rain but cold.

    Bottom line for me is that when it's sufficiently cold out, the weight hit to be warm enough in terms of both above and underneath insulation leaves me with a significantly heavier set of sleeping gear. For example, starting on the AT in late Feb I'll be using a very lightweight (not waterproof) bivy combined with a Gatewood cape used as both tarp/tent & raingear. I can't get close to that weight package with my HH and sufficient insulation (JRB or whatever). And starting that early makes "drying out and/or sleeping in" a shelter a good option (at least I'm guessing the shelters won't be as full for a thru-hiker starting in Feb ...).

    In other seasons and/or on other trails where there are enough of the right kinds of trees, a hammock is without doubt a great shelter, not least for the ability to stealth camp and in the right conditions to greatly expand the options for finding a campsite, and for at least many people, the comfort and consistency of the experience (no roots, rocks, to sleep on).

    W.r.t. the original thread (!), I've spent many a night in my Tarptent Contrail --- a very roomy solo single wall tent. Between that and the Gatewood Cape and my Gossamer Gear pack I would feel very comfortable buying any product from any of these three companies (tarptent.com, sixmoondesigns.com, gossamergear.com). I love these cottage industry companies that keep pushing the limits of what gear can do for us.

  15. #15
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    From the ones you mentioned, definitely the Rainbow. With the two side grommets for vertical trekking poles, the long center pole and multiple tieouts, none of the other ones come close.

    The One's vestibule does not come down far enough and will let in wind driven rain. That sucked BTW.

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    I own a both a Zoid 1 and a Tarptent. Both are fine on even ground with small amounts of rain. But should you end up in a less than desirable location in heavy rains, like I did several times, water can pour in. I ended up floating on my Thermarest... not fun...

  17. #17

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    Hammock tents are wonderful, especially if your trips are out east where it's easier to find good trees. Other than that, consider a tarp instead of a tarptent, etc.

    Easier to set up, generally more spacious, properly position you stay dry.

    Only downside is bugs, consider a small bug net or bivy.

    I am not a fan of tarp tents after using one for a season. If I pack a tent, it'll be a real tent.

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Trooper View Post
    What is the better tent, the Gossamer Gear, The One or the Tarp Tent , Rainbow any pros or cons.
    I am looking for something light weight but will stand up to bad weather as well as blood sucking bugs and will hold up for lots of miles
    I know from reading about it the Hilleberg Akto has many favorable reviews as a lightweight solo tent, of tunnel-like design, that is very good at stormy, cold-wet weather. When it gets warmer I think it becomes uncomfortable to use do to it not having a lot of ventilation. Another excellent tent, though somewhat heavier is the Hilleberg Solo, which is freestanding. Both of these are pricey, but of good quality.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by ShelterLeopard View Post
    I have been very close to changing to a hammock for that very reason. (But, I like sleeping on solid ground. For now, anyway.)
    There's never a wet floor in a hammock.............
    Shalom.
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11
    Did Adam and Eve rest on the first Sabbath? Scripture only says that God did. Are we thinking yet?

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by DapperD View Post
    I know from reading about it the Hilleberg Akto has many favorable reviews as a lightweight solo tent, of tunnel-like design, that is very good at stormy, cold-wet weather. When it gets warmer I think it becomes uncomfortable to use do to it not having a lot of ventilation. Another excellent tent, though somewhat heavier is the Hilleberg Solo, which is freestanding. Both of these are pricey, but of good quality.
    I have an Akto. Keep the door partially open or you'll be wringing out your soaked shirt every time you exit the vestibule. It does not do a very good job of minimizing condensation. The fly goes all the way to the ground all the way around except at the ends.
    If you want a very light solo tent that will handle high winds, though, the Akto is absolutely worth a good, long look. With the optional mesh inner, it could be all things to all (solo hikers, that is).
    As I live, declares the Lord God, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that the wicked turn back from his way and live. Ezekiel 33:11
    Did Adam and Eve rest on the first Sabbath? Scripture only says that God did. Are we thinking yet?

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