Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 29
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-19-2009
    Location
    Newnan, Georgia
    Posts
    4

    Default what kind of hiking shoe

    hey there everyone. I was told that if you are packing UL then you don't really need to wear hiking boots and that it would be fine to use trail running shoes. Does anyone know if this is true?

    manta

  2. #2

    Default

    I'm not an ul hiker, however I keep my pack weight at 25-28 total lbs. I like Nike trail runners. Very comfortable and sturdy enough for me.

    Detour

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-15-2003
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    3,945

    Default

    Heck you don't even need shoes- AKA the "Barefoot Sisters"!

    Seriously, lots of thru's wear trailrunners and do well in them. However, most new generation hiking footwear are built on a running shoe foundation and the weight difference between them is negligible. The Keen Targhee Mid comes to mind here.

    Some things to consider- foot shape, arch type, toebox width, volume fit with/without insoles.......

    Go for comfort first then water repellency. In other words, don't get caught up in the "Gortex is better" arguement. It's not. If you're thru-hiking your feet will get wet.

    Good luck.

  4. #4
    Wheeler Wheeler's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-31-2009
    Location
    Stonington,Ct.
    Age
    38
    Posts
    212
    Images
    25

    Default

    I find it true for me anyway. Your ankles get pretty strong, and with less weight, you're less likely to roll them. I think you automatically watch your step a little more, too.

  5. #5
    Garlic
    Join Date
    10-15-2008
    Location
    Golden, CO
    Age
    57
    Posts
    4,027
    Images
    2

    Default

    Welcome to Whiteblaze.

    That's absolutely true for many here. Here's a relatively recent poll: http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/show...ight=boot+shoe This shows pretty even distribution among boot and shoe users on Whiteblaze. The funny thing is, there's an older poll that shows many more boot users. So running shoes are apparently rapidly becoming more popular.

    That's what happened to me. At the time of the older poll (2002), I was a confirmed leather boot person. But then I turned 40 and my knees started hurting badly. I switched to running shoes, my knees felt great, I hike more miles than ever, and now only use boots for trail work.

    It took a few months for me to build up stength in my ankles after decades of boot use. I walked on mostly easy level trails in that time period. For many more months, I paid closer attention to foot placement. Now I don't even think about it.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  6. #6
    Registered User d.o.c's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-24-2009
    Location
    troutville, Va
    Age
    24
    Posts
    613

    Default

    I wasnt that UL but i wore montrails and workd fine and most folks i saw all had runners so i thnk ull be fine...

  7. #7
    Registered User Rick500's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-10-2010
    Location
    Louisville, Kentucky
    Posts
    413

    Default

    I'm trying to stay around 25 pounds, and have tried several different shoes:

    New Balance 572 trail runners -- I found that going downhill, my foot moved too much in the shoe (and they're the right size). I tried using green Superfeet in them, but the volume was a little too low in the shoe and the Superfeet crowded my foot too much. Traction was also not great.

    La Sportiva FC 1.1 -- These are better for me, a little heavier than trail runners but still lighter than light boots. The insoles that come with them are decent and more rigid and with a higher arch than the New Balance shoes. I think these would work for me long-term.

    Salomon Exit Aero -- These fit my feet very well. About the same weight as the La Sportivas (I haven't weighed them, but seems to be so). A little more padded than the others, and the footbed is a little stiffer. I like them a lot. The heel seems to be the slightest bit narrower than the others, but overall the best fit for me. I didn't like the very thin and light insoles that came in them, so I put the insoles from the La Sportivas in them and that's working out very well.

    I have a pair of Montrail insoles (the kind that you heat up in the oven and form-fit to your foot), but they have bunched up in the area under my toes so I'm going to have to call Montrail and see if I can get another set. For now the La Sportiva insoles are great in any of the above three pairs of shoes.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-07-2003
    Location
    Springfield,TN USA
    Age
    60
    Posts
    2,019
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    404

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by manta View Post
    hey there everyone. I was told that if you are packing UL then you don't really need to wear hiking boots and that it would be fine to use trail running shoes. Does anyone know if this is true?
    manta


    its ALL about personal preferance & what WORKS for YOU!

    I bought some Vasque Trail Runners...a few years back...used them for the 1st part of my section hike last year...but had to go back to my heavy boot (Vasque Sundowners)on 2nd half of hike...(the WET trail runners were blistering my feet...)

    Good Luck!"


    i'll be hiking Apr 24-May 8
    Clarks Valley,PA NOBO to Greenwood Lake,NY
    w/ "Jigsaw"
    see ya'll UP the trail!

    "Jaybird"

    GA-ME...
    "on-the-20-year-plan"

    www.trailjournals.com/Jaybird2013

  9. #9
    57.0% Berserker's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-09-2008
    Location
    Lynchburg, VA
    Age
    41
    Posts
    529
    Images
    1

    Default Yeah, figure out what works for you

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybird View Post
    its ALL about personal preferance & what WORKS for YOU!
    I'm going to echo this comment because I agree 100%. I don't think there is any rule of thumb so to speak, just whatever works for you. The best thing is to experiment with foot wear on shorter hikes to work out the kinks. Also remember that the most important thing is to find a shoe that fits your feet well. What works for others may not work for you, so try on different models from different manufacturers to see what fits you best.

    My experience is that I wore varying types of boots for years (full leather to lighter weight synthetics), and did not reach a "foot nirvana" until I started using trail runners recently. My full pack weight is normally in the 25 - 30 lb range, but I have been out in them with a 37 lb pack and things went fine. I used to subscribe to the herd mentality where I thought I needed to wear boots, and it took a lot to change my thinking. I also had to build up my muscles in my feet and ankles to comfortably wear the trail runners. Some may be able to jump right into them, but I needed to do some training on local trails in them to get things built up.

    Now I can't go back to boots. I wore my full leather boots in January on a hike due to the snow, and it just sucked walking in them. I love how the trail runners have the open mesh that keeps my feet cool, and the soft flexible soles that allow me walk more naturally.

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-19-2009
    Location
    Newnan, Georgia
    Posts
    4

    Default

    wow...thank you to all of you for your great info and opening my mind up to realize boots are not everything.

  11. #11

    Default

    Once you get your pack weight down, backpacking feels like dayhiking. Whatever you can go for a nice walk on a trail in you can wear backpacking. I go backpacking in street running shoes, I've worn flip-flops and Chacos, I even went backpacking in some moccasins. Trail runners feel like big boots to me lately so I've been trying to find lighter, simpler trail shoes.
    Some knew me as Piper, others as just Diane.
    I hiked the PCT: Mexico to Mt. Shasta, 2008. Santa Barbara to Canada, 2009.

  12. #12
    Registered User singingpilgrim's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-04-2008
    Location
    Moore, SC
    Age
    28
    Posts
    50
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    I was totally planning on using trail runners because I am simply not used to using any sort of boot in any aspect of my life and thought 'they're lighter and since I'm used to sneakers it won't be much of an adjustment'...
    But then on a thread in the female forum, it was pointed out that if you're overweight, you NEED to wear boots because regardless of your pack size, your body weight will come down hard on your ankles. This probably goes for the big tall guys, even if they're not overweight.

    So even though I think they sound uncomfortable, I'm going to wear boots.
    But I figure I'll lose weight, my ankles will get stronger, and my boots will wear out at some point. So after some odd hundred or thousand miles when I replace them, I may go for the trail runners.

    I'm not saying you're overweight. But I just thought I'd throw this out there for overweight people like me who might see this and rather say 'aww, darn' and save their ankles then risk the injury and not complete their hike.
    He who forms the mountains,
    creates the wind,
    and reveals his thoughts to man,
    he who turns dawn to darkness,
    and treads the high places of the earth—
    the LORD God Almighty is his name.
    -Amos 4:13


  13. #13
    Registered User lazy river road's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-27-2009
    Location
    Baltimore, Maryland
    Age
    34
    Posts
    277

    Default

    Look into Brooks Cascade 5 Trail runners. Out of all the pairs ive tried on these by far were the most comfortable but it all depends on your foot. I plan on carrying 30 pds including food and 5-6 days worth of food.

    http://www.brooksrunning.com/product...4/Cascadia%205

    After wearing boots on my first overnight trip which was just an easy 8 in and 8 out i dont think ill ever wear boots again except if their is a foot or more of snow on the ground.
    Half of the people can be part right all of the time,Some of the people can be all right part of the time. But all the people can't be all right all the time

  14. #14

    Default

    I don't think boots are going to save your ankles if you are overweight. They will weaken your ankles by preventing them being used. This is the ultralight forum so unless you are planning to go ultraheavy with your gear, boots are completely unnecessary. I mean, you don't wear boots to bring in the groceries, do you? Your pack shouldn't be too much more than that in weight.
    Some knew me as Piper, others as just Diane.
    I hiked the PCT: Mexico to Mt. Shasta, 2008. Santa Barbara to Canada, 2009.

  15. #15
    Registered User mtnkngxt's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-29-2007
    Location
    Hampton, VA
    Age
    26
    Posts
    684
    Images
    1

    Default

    I'm really liking my Montrail AT Plus. That said, I would not want to use them with over 30 pound pack weight, as they are super low cut trail runners, and provide no stability for the ankle. The more weight on your back, the more support you need at the ankle IMO.

    For UL or even the sub 35lb people, these work great.

  16. #16
    SunnyWalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-16-2007
    Location
    Pampa, TX
    Age
    61
    Posts
    2,030
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    44

    Default

    Get paqckweight down. Use lighter shoes. "Keen", Good brand to check out.
    "Something hidden. Go and find it. Go, and look behind the Ranges. Something lost behind the Ranges. Lost and waiting for you . . . Go!" (Rudyard Kipling)
    From SunnyWalker, SOBO CDT hiker starting June 2014.
    Please visit: SunnyWalker.Net

  17. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-31-2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Age
    35
    Posts
    4,273
    Images
    17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    I don't think boots are going to save your ankles if you are overweight. They will weaken your ankles by preventing them being used.
    I believe the exact opposite, unless maybe you tighten the piss out of your boots. I keep the top somewhat loose and have found that my ankles work much harder in boots than in very lightweight running shoes. I believe this is because boots have a higher heel that puts more strain on the ankle joint. It also doesn't help that the soles of boots are so stiff that they practically encourage you to step all over rocks, which also forces the ankles to work harder. The lightweight running shoes have a much lower heel and a softer sole, but of which forces my ankles to work less.

    Anyway, I love boots. If they weren't so hot I would have utterly no desire to switch footwear. My only reason for wearing trail running shoes is that I don't have to take hourly breaks to cool & dry off my feet.

  18. #18

    Default

    I'm looking to get the Keen shoes with good ventilation. I have a pair of their sandles and love the way they feel. I know they won't last as long, but after hiking 20 miles of the AT this weekend, my ASOLO fugitives were WAY TOO HOT..... I need some sort of ventilation during the spring and summer. I will only use the Asolos for winter from now on.

  19. #19
    Wild at Heart J5man's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-12-2006
    Location
    Nashville, TN (Franklin)
    Age
    52
    Posts
    453
    Images
    32

    Default

    It's all a personal choice and a continuous learning curve. 3 years ago, my first overnight back was with a 70lb pack with lightweight hiking boots with insoles. I had the worst blisters I had ever had.........by lighteng the load and the insoles I can use those same boots just fine........I have continued to lighten my load and have used my Brooks trail runners with a 25lb pack with success. I was surprised because I thought to have a "hiking boot" but in dry conditions, I am liking the trail runners much better. I change something in my gear and clothes, or shoes on every hike............which is half the fun.

  20. #20
    Registered User johnnyblisters's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-02-2005
    Location
    Frostburg, MD
    Age
    26
    Posts
    330
    Images
    23

    Default

    Merrell Moab ventilator. I highly recommend these shoes due to comfort, weight, and decent durability. They are tops.
    -milkman

    got soul?

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •