Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 21
  1. #1
    Registered User skybrew's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-28-2010
    Location
    Hampton, NJ
    Age
    63
    Posts
    17

    Default Pitching tent in rain

    I've been lucky on my shorter packing trips re: setting up my tent in the rain - I never had to. I'm sure that will not be the case on my upcoming thru.

    So what techniques do folks use to pitch a dual-wall (body + fly) tent in the rain to minimize water/moisture on the floor until the fly is set up?

    Single-walls or tarp tent do not (seem to) have this problem...but then they have the condensation issues. I am looking at some single-walls but would very much like some tips on setting up a double-wall in the rain. TIA. Cheers!
    Skip/Strider
    NoBo 3/21/11
    "Only that day dawns to which we are awake". HD Thoreau

  2. #2
    AT 2010, FHT 2010-11, BMT '11, Bartram'11, LT'12, Pinhoti '13, Sheltowee, '13' 10-K's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-30-2007
    Location
    Erwin, TN
    Age
    52
    Posts
    7,311

    Default

    Bring a sponge or an absorbent cloth, take your time and pitch it correctly (almost) as if it weren't raining.

    My experience is that rushing like a madman to get a tent up in the rain is not the best way to go.

  3. #3
    with a case of blind faith
    Join Date
    08-06-2004
    Location
    Pulaski/Memphis Tennessee
    Age
    57
    Posts
    470
    Images
    35

    Default

    1. Have rain fly already attached to tent. 2. Pack tent up top so it comes out first, or near first. 3. Pull tent out of pack and re-attach pack cover. Set pack aside. 4. Lay out tent and set up.

  4. #4

    Default

    I can't quite fully attach my fly in advance as Tractor recommended. I lay the fly over the tent to cover it while I work in the 4 corner stakes and the 2 curvilinear poles. As long as the non-waterproof part of the tent doesn't take a lot of rain, it's usually OK.

    Keep your backpack covered and against the trunk of a good-sized tree, preferably a hemlock.
    Last edited by Cookerhiker; 02-25-2011 at 09:34.

  5. #5
    Registered User hobbs's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-12-2010
    Location
    Austin Texas
    Age
    45
    Posts
    483
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    8

    Default

    Use the tent fly Like cookerhiker said as like a tarp..Get a piece of shamwow and you can clean any condensation or water on the floor. You can also use a shamwow for getting water out of area's that you can wring it out and treat the water...Military does it all the time when on a patrol..
    My love for life is quit simple .i get uo in the moring and then i go to bed at night. What I do inbween is to occupy my time. Cary Grant

  6. #6
    Registered User russb's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-07-2007
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Age
    43
    Posts
    776

    Default

    Many double wall tents have a "fast-pitch" option for just the rainfly. Thus one possibility is to setup the rainfly with the poles and then attach the inner wall in the dry of the fly. Depending on your tent, this may or may not be possible. Try it out, it may not work initially if you have a routine you are used to, changing that routine might be a learning curve.

  7. #7
    Registered User russb's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-07-2007
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Age
    43
    Posts
    776

    Default

    Another benefit to the reverse-order setup (rainfly first, then inner-wall) is if you do it in good weather. It will allow the reverse take-down in nasty conditions. So the inner wall and your stuff stays dry and gets packed and the rainfly/poles are last and can be placed in an outer pack pocket. Often you can setup the tent when the weather is good, but in the morning it is pouring rain and trying to take it down, fly first will soak the inner wall. As i mentioned in my first post, not all tents can be done in the reverse order. I know the MSR Hubba can be done this way.

  8. #8

    Default

    Like some here, I carry a (knockoff) shamwow (actually 1/2) to soak up any moisture. I also use it for cleanup on other tasks as well. I have put up my tent in very poor conditions and the amount of rain in the tent afterwards is minimal.

  9. #9
    Registered User bulldog49's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-27-2004
    Location
    Anderson, IN
    Age
    64
    Posts
    1,032

    Default

    The advantage afforded when pitching in the rain was the primary reason I switched to a single wall. I can't speak about other single wall tents, but my SMD Lunar Solo has never given me a condensation problem.
    "If you don't know where you're going...any road will get you there."
    "He who's not busy living is busy dying"

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bulldog49 View Post
    The advantage afforded when pitching in the rain was the primary reason I switched to a single wall. I can't speak about other single wall tents, but my SMD Lunar Solo has never given me a condensation problem.
    And it's also kept you dry inside?

  11. #11
    Registered User Ewker's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-07-2005
    Location
    southeast
    Age
    63
    Posts
    1,959
    Images
    21

    Default

    I use to carry a small tarp and put it up first. Then I could just sit under it untils the rain stops or pitch the tent under it.
    Conquest: It is not the Mountain we conquer but Ourselves

  12. #12
    Registered User TACKLE's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-12-2005
    Location
    Laporte,PA
    Age
    60
    Posts
    86
    Images
    16

    Default tarp

    Just go with a tarp. Lay down your pack under your tarp,set up tarp,then spread out your groundsheet,and your set. Tarp setup will not have condensation problem,and hence a drier slleeping area.

    Aloha and good luck

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-02-2008
    Location
    prairie du chien, WI
    Age
    63
    Posts
    499

    Default

    Skip, the above posts are good advice--take your time, sponge out the inside, rig a tarp or your poncho first.

    Learning to function in the rain is one of the skills you just have to learn on the trail and a lot depends on your shelter set up and how rain friendly it is.

    Try to keep an eye on developing conditions and plan ahead so you get off the mountain or to the camp/shelter in time. Maybe even stay over until the rain lets up in the mornng befor you head out.

    Most of the time getting wet is not such a big deal--at least not as big as slipping on wet leaves as you rush about trying to set up fast. Its just water after all. But some days are cold, or will be cold after the rain hits, and those are the times you need to be careful and thoughtful about setting up in time and in a sheltered place--preferably a place where you will be able to make a fire to dry out after. And there are times when it is just going to be wet for days and there is nothing you can do but keep well fed to keep your core temp up and stay as dry as possible by body heat drying out your clothes.

    You will learn to think outside of normal shelter options to protect yourself. Sometimes you can make a temporary refuge and wait until there is a break in the rain to set up your tent. A poncho can work as a small 'tent' --one time I just put my pad down and leaned on my pack with a small tarp wrapped around me until the rain let up and then set up camp--many times I have pulled the canoe up on shore and tied it to trees, got under it and waited for rain and hail to ease up. At night, I have packed up my sleeping bag and sat in the tent with my rain gear on with a sponge and pot to soak up the leakage, the next day I had a dry bag to nap in while my friends were trying not to burn holes in their bags as they dried over the fire.

    The greatest lesson from rain is to be flexable--you are on mother nature's schedule now and she will let you put up a dry tent when she is ready.

  14. #14
    Registered User 4Bears's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-25-2009
    Location
    Mishawaka, IN
    Age
    61
    Posts
    600

    Default

    Grey Fox that is some of the soundest advice I have ever read on these pages, well done.

  15. #15
    ~ SAGE
    Join Date
    07-22-2008
    Location
    Virginia Beach, Virginia
    Age
    45
    Posts
    407
    Images
    16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by russb View Post
    Another benefit to the reverse-order setup (rainfly first, then inner-wall) is if you do it in good weather. It will allow the reverse take-down in nasty conditions. So the inner wall and your stuff stays dry and gets packed and the rainfly/poles are last and can be placed in an outer pack pocket. Often you can setup the tent when the weather is good, but in the morning it is pouring rain and trying to take it down, fly first will soak the inner wall. As i mentioned in my first post, not all tents can be done in the reverse order. I know the MSR Hubba can be done this way.
    Yep! I have the Hubba Hubba and have set it up in torrential downpours this way. Rainfly first, then crawl under and set up the tent. Nice and dry. Take down the same way.

    A couple of fellow hikers watched me do this on one trip and by the next hike, they also had purchased the MSR tents. Heh!

  16. #16
    Registered User skybrew's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-28-2010
    Location
    Hampton, NJ
    Age
    63
    Posts
    17

    Default

    Thanks Folks! Great info & techniques. I'm feeling better but will not miss any rain showers during set uo or take down! Cheers!!
    Skip/Strider
    NoBo 3/21/11
    "Only that day dawns to which we are awake". HD Thoreau

  17. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-16-2005
    Location
    Salisbury, NC
    Age
    60
    Posts
    138

    Default

    Skye,

    It appears you have a few weeks before you leave out. Chances are you will have some rain at home before leaving. Take your tent, the above-mentioned advice and go out in the pouring rain and give it a try.

  18. #18
    Registered User skybrew's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-28-2010
    Location
    Hampton, NJ
    Age
    63
    Posts
    17

    Default

    Thanks Gramps! NJ weather has been cooperating on the 'rain' side - tested poncho & shell gear the other day with acceptable results. I've been practicing the various techniques mentioned above and variations in the better weather. WIll do the rain set-up during the next storm. Once again, thanks all! Cheers!
    Skip/Strider
    NoBo 3/21/11
    "Only that day dawns to which we are awake". HD Thoreau

  19. #19

    Default

    In 2009 it rained a lot so I would try to stop at shelters and most were very full. So I would politely ask if anyone minded me setting it up in the shelter then I would carry it out add 2 stakes to the fly to stake it down then toss my pack in the vestuble while I jumped in the tent and got off my rain gear. Bottom line is if it rains......and it will ,you will figure out what works best
    "When you were born, you cried and the world rejoiced. Live your life so that when you die, the world cries and you rejoice."

  20. #20
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-18-2007
    Location
    Philadelphia
    Posts
    1,315
    Images
    36

    Default

    I have a Tarptent, weight drive this decision, 34 oz and tons of room, have pitched in plenty of downpours, keep rain gear on (obviously), pack cover on, pitch tent slowly and carefully, you are already soaked and cannot get an more wet, a Scottish caddie once told me, "We are humans, we are waterproof".

    After the tent is pitched I quickly take the pack cover off and throw my pack into the dry tent, then hang my pack cover, get the bear bag rope setup in the woods (reflective rope, easy to spot with headlamp on), then get into the tent leaving the rain gear in the vestibule.

    Blow up Neo Air, /wet clothes off, dry clothes on, get into sleeping bag, eat, drink, relax, enjoy listening to the rain. Wipe stuff down with small rag, tons dryer inside than outside, even with some droplets or condensation..........

    Dry wet clothes under Neo Air at night, nice and pressed in the am...........

    Have started carrying a pee bottle so that I dont have to leave / get wet for this simple housekeeping item...........some of my best nights sleep in the woods has been in the rain.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •