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  1. #1
    Registered User OldFeet's Avatar
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    Default Ready to Hang Myself

    After reading all the comments here on hammocks I finally decided to hang on this year's section hike in May and just ordered an Expedition Asym Zip from Hennessey. Once it gets here l plan on spending a night or two in the back yard to get a feel for it, especially in terms of sleeping on a cooler night. For past trips I've been using a Therma-Rest Z-lite pad along with a twenty degree bag and am wondering how this will translate for hammock use.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Ender's Avatar
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    Those will work fine, though the z-rest will probably be annoying. I'd look into getting a non-folding pad.

    Also, quick tip, hang your feet end a bit higher than your head end. Makes for a much more comfortable sleep.
    Don't take anything I say seriously... I certainly don't.

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    Registered User OldFeet's Avatar
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    That's interesting. My initial thought was that the head end would be higher than my feet. Thanks for the tip.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by OldFeet View Post
    That's interesting. My initial thought was that the head end would be higher than my feet. Thanks for the tip.
    My hiking buddy hangs his hammock with the foot end a little higher than the head. He finds it more comfortable, and he certainly doesn't have to worry about ending up sleeping on the hammock opening. I saw someone else slide out of his Hennessey one time - rude awakening. (This is NOT easy to do - he had gotten his sleeping bag partly through the opening.)

    I like to sleep more or less flat in mine.

    You may want to try out an underquilt. I like mine a lot better than my pad.

    -FA

  5. #5
    Hiker bigcranky's Avatar
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    Yeah, feet higher than head, by a couple of inches. That keeps you from jamming your feet into the foot end all night. I've used a Z-rest in my HH, and it keeps me warm enough, but it's a PITA because when I sit on it inside the hammock, it folds up behind me. Hard to lie down on a pad as it folds up under me. Now I use a 3/4 Ridgerest for summer hammocking.
    Ken B
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  6. #6

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    Yes, feet higher than head, as others have said, and if you orient your body diagonally, you'll be almost flat. Definitely practice at home for a few nights. There are lots of little things that make for a comfortable experience besides warmth. The distance between trees, the height of the hammock, amount of play in the hammock straps, the tarp arrangement (either to block the wind or to allow it to pass through -- they all make a difference.

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    Hiker bigcranky's Avatar
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    Distance between trees: I find an easy way to measure this is to stand in the middle between two trees, and hold my trekking poles out as far as I can toward the trees. If the distance is about the same, then it will work for my hammock. A foot or so in either direction is usually fine, too.
    Ken B
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  8. #8

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    I have been a hammock hanger for about 6 months now and have used my WB BB 1.1 Dbl. on several weekend trips. Thus far, I am very happy with my change from tent to hammock and love my BB. I have used a ccf pad thus far but I have become convinced that an under quilt is the way to go for comfort and the elimination of cold spots. There is a definite learning curve to using a hammock but stick with and try different set ups. The hammock forum here on WB offers a great source of info. For me personally it has made a big difference in my ability to get a good nights sleep on the trail.

  9. #9
    Registered User OldFeet's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the advice and I definitely intend to try at least a couple nights in it before I hit the trail. Fortunately Virginia shouldn't be real cold the end of May and I do tend to be a warm sleeper so that will help a bit with the learning curve. It really does look like it will be a much better shelter than my tent.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bigcranky View Post
    Distance between trees: I find an easy way to measure this is to stand in the middle between two trees, and hold my trekking poles out as far as I can toward the trees. If the distance is about the same, then it will work for my hammock. A foot or so in either direction is usually fine, too.
    Thanks for the trekking pole tip. I've never thought about doing that.

  11. #11
    Registered User dejoha's Avatar
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    I personally don't intentionally hang one end higher or lower than another. It's a personal preference, so try it out if it works for you.

    Another tip I give people for finding the right distance between trees is "3 Paces, Reach Head High, Hang." I've got an illustration posted on HammockForums.net.
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  12. #12
    Registered User OldFeet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dejoha View Post
    I personally don't intentionally hang one end higher or lower than another. It's a personal preference, so try it out if it works for you.

    Another tip I give people for finding the right distance between trees is "3 Paces, Reach Head High, Hang." I've got an illustration posted on HammockForums.net.

    I liked the illustration and conveniently enough found two trees about three paces apart in the woods in front of my house. Head high was just about the perfect height since I'm a little under six feet. The first night hanging was great and I'm looking forward to hanging in the rain over the weekend. Definintely much nicer than sleeping in a tent.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by dornstar View Post
    Thanks for the trekking pole tip. I've never thought about doing that.
    +1 - gonna use this tip for sure
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    Default Ready to Hang Myself

    I have a z lite as well and it does make for an awkward hammock application. Luckily I sprang for an ENO reactor hammock which holds it in place and it doesn't "taco" quite as easily. I'm sure an inflatable would do better but other than that one can't get much more comfortable than a good down bag with a pad in a hammock

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    For Nubees you really need to spend a little time with Shug and like most of us learn from a Master. Enjoy all 10 parts http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7NZVqpBUV0 All is well in sector 7

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    Registered User OldFeet's Avatar
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    I've begun working my way through Shug's videos and he is obviously a man of many talents. Hammock Forums has really turned out to be a terrific resource.

  17. #17
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    Avoid a inflatable pad in your hammnock, they are heavy and bulky. If you do not have an UQ (under quilt) go with waffle patterened blue foam pad from wally world. 24+ inches wide, pleanty long, weighs 15oz and cost about $13. I am 6ft2 and 280 lbs and have used one for a couple of years and have used it down to the high teens.
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  18. #18
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    I seldom hang one end higher but if I do I hang the head higher. I've never had a problem jamming my feet. ymmv. The key is to keep the wind off your back. Practice more than a couple of times and make sure you have it down before heading into the woods. Practice at a park or someplace with trees of different spacing. It's one thing to be able to setup consistently with the same trees repeatedly and something entirely different when they're much closer or much further apart than what you're used to.
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by gunner76 View Post
    Avoid a inflatable pad in your hammnock, they are heavy and bulky. If you do not have an UQ (under quilt) go with waffle patterened blue foam pad from wally world. 24+ inches wide, pleanty long, weighs 15oz and cost about $13.
    My experience has been just the opposite. CCF pads do not conform to the shape of my hammock. They wrinkle up and cause uncomfortable spots. Instead, a partially-inflated pad works best for me. They shape to the contours of a hammock much better, in my experience. Not to mention, are far less bulky than CCF pads. Plus, you can use insulated ones in winter and non-insulated in summer.

    Having said that, I do intend to get an UQ some day when the budget allows the luxury of a single-function, dedicated-function item.

    To each his own. Hike your own hike!

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  20. #20
    Registered User OldFeet's Avatar
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    I'm definitely trying a few different setups before heading off on my section hike. The budget won't allow for an UQ this trip so will have to get by with the CCF pad which has worked pretty well in the yard. Fortunately we're surrounded by woods so there are a lot of different tree options and l've really come ot love my nights sleeping in the hammock.

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