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  1. #1
    Registered User 3030's Avatar
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    Default Klymit Inertia Pads

    Does anyone use one of the Klymit Inertia pads? If you can even call it a pad I suppose, but I was looking into getting the torso length version, as it's only 6oz and is suppose to allow your sleeping bag to loft still.

    The theory is nice, but I want to hear other's opinion before I try the kool-aid

  2. #2
    ChinMusic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3030 View Post
    Does anyone use one of the Klymit Inertia pads? If you can even call it a pad I suppose, but I was looking into getting the torso length version, as it's only 6oz and is suppose to allow your sleeping bag to loft still.

    The theory is nice, but I want to hear other's opinion before I try the kool-aid
    The logic regarding the loft is sound. I think if one is the type of sleeper that stays in one position all night it would work fine. I am all over the place and just can't see it working for me. I am dong well to stay on my pad, but I have never tried the Inertia.
    Fear ridges that are depicted as flat lines on a profile map.

  3. #3
    Registered User MaggieMaeFlower's Avatar
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    I called Klymit about 3-4 days ago. I sleep in a hammock with an underquilt and I'm very happy but I like the comfort of knowing I have a ground pad if I need one. I was originally interested in the Longer 72" version at 9.1oz. After doing some research, the body mapping technology only works if your pressure points actually hit the same points on the pad. If you are short (I'm 5'2") or you move around a lot, you may not love it. After talking with one of their employees I decided I would be better off with the torso length X-Lite at 6.1 oz and 41". If you chose the shorter pad you will have to find something to put your feet up on, like your pack or a stuff sack, or you will not give the sleeping bag the ability to loft. I have not purchased one yet but plan to do so in the near future. Let me know if you get one and love/hate it!

  4. #4
    Registered User 3030's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaggieMaeFlower View Post
    I sleep in a hammock with an underquilt and I'm very happy but I like the comfort of knowing I have a ground pad if I need one. I was originally interested in the Longer 72" version at 9.1oz. After doing some research, the body mapping technology only works if your pressure points actually hit the same points on the pad. If you are short (I'm 5'2") or you move around a lot, you may not love it. After talking with one of their employees I decided I would be better off with the torso length X-Lite at 6.1 oz and 41". If you chose the shorter pad you will have to find something to put your feet up on, like your pack or a stuff sack, or you will not give the sleeping bag the ability to loft. I have not purchased one yet but plan to do so in the near future. Let me know if you get one and love/hate it!
    Will do! After reading your post, two main thoughts came to my mind:
    1. My intention is to get into hammock-ing before I try for a thru-hike, so you will now be my go-to for hammock questions, such as...

    2. What hammock do you use? and where the heck are you suppose to put your pack! I cant imagine having it at your feet, barreling towards you all night long. But if I go for the short Inertia, I don't know what I'd use to suspend my feet up to allow for lofting.

  5. #5
    Registered User MaggieMaeFlower's Avatar
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    I would not recommend the Inertia for use in a hammock! I am only considering one if I want to sleep in a shelter for a night or in a situation like the Smokies where you are supposed to sleep in the shelter unless it is full.

    My hammock set up is as follows:
    Tarp - Hammock Gear 4 season Cuben Fiber 6.5 oz
    Hammock/Suspension - Hennessy Hyperlite Asym Zip (with whoopie slings) 16.4oz
    Burrow (overquilt) - Hammock Gear 20F Down (short) 16oz
    Underquilt- Hammock Gear 20F Down (3/4 length) 16.7oz

    This is a 3 season set up for me. Please remember I am short and a 3/4 underquilt covers the length of my body. I originally used a Therm-a-Rest Z-Lite in the hammock with me under my 20F mummy bag, this kept me warm. My current setup is much more comfortable. The "doors" on the tarp offer me the privacy I need when changing clothes.

    For a backpack I have a HMG (Hyperlight Mountain Gear) Windrider. It is waterproof and can be put right under your hammock set up. If you don't like the idea of a waterproof pack you can put your pack in a trash bag or use a bag liner to ensure your contents stay dry if it rains, even though the tarp should/will keep it dry.

    When switching your gear over to a hammock setup, I would recommend buying the hammock first. (Hennessy with take off the charge of their stock tarp if you call and ask, saved me $80) The tarp next, then the underquilt, and switch your sleeping bag last if you still have money left. This is just my opinion from my experience.

  6. #6
    Ounces are the little-death
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    Surprisingly hard to find legitimate reviews of this.

  7. #7
    Registered User 3030's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScottS View Post
    Surprisingly hard to find legitimate reviews of this.
    Precisely why I posed this question. However, now that situations have changed, I plan to stick with my Trail Scout M. I wanted to get something with a higher R-Value, but if I want to do a thru-hike in the next 2 years I need to save a lot of extra money.

  8. #8
    Registered User MaggieMaeFlower's Avatar
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    Stumbled upon this review today for the longer version.
    http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/Sleepi...nertia-X-Frame

  9. #9
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    I have been thinking of getting the inertia pad. Im not sure which length. I live in California where the night can get cold, 45-55f. I always use a sleeping pad under me. I like the idea of the skeleton. If I get one ill post and I will check back to see what other thingk

  10. #10
    Registered User mtnkngxt's Avatar
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    Had mine for 6 months. Love hate relationship with it. I use a bivy and a quilt so the loft pockets function more as heat loss pockets for me. During the summer and warmer months this is fine because it actually helps keep me cool at night and sleep better, during the cooler months however it is reduced to problematic at best. I've considered going with a thin pad from gossamer gear to act as a heat barrier and insulate the pockets better, but at the end of the day I'm going with a zlite or other ccf pad for the cooler months. The actual support I find good at 6'0 and 165 pounds.

  11. #11

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    I really like my Klymit pad, but you should be aware that its not for everyone. I've heard positive reviews from almost everyone who felt that they "fit" the pad, which is a height around 5'9"-6'3" or so, possibly more. It's worth trying out. Be aware that it might not work for you, and be prepared to return it.
    I put mine inside my sleeping bag because I fall off of it too much.

    The lofting technique is damned difficult to compare to other pads, so its hard to say about effectiveness--but if you find the klymit pads comfortable, they're the lightest inflatable pads imaginable. And they pack up tiny as hell. The only reason I might not take it on my thru-hike is that I may end up going with the even lighter CCF pad I bought from Lawson Equipment.

  12. #12
    Registered User Razor's Avatar
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    I have used a 3/4 length one for about 100 nights( last year ) and am fairly pleased.I do roll off at times because I do move a lot at night. It is as good as others that are much heavier. The trade says they are coming out with a wider one this spring which I will probably buy because 100 nights is close to an inflatable's life. Hope the extra room gives more comfort without a lot of weight penalty. Also I add a3/8" pad for the lower area during March/April cold. This combo is very light and warm enough.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnkngxt View Post
    Had mine for 6 months. Love hate relationship with it. I use a bivy and a quilt so the loft pockets function more as heat loss pockets for me. During the summer and warmer months this is fine because it actually helps keep me cool at night and sleep better, during the cooler months however it is reduced to problematic at best. I've considered going with a thin pad from gossamer gear to act as a heat barrier and insulate the pockets better, but at the end of the day I'm going with a zlite or other ccf pad for the cooler months. The actual support I find good at 6'0 and 165 pounds.
    I don't want to knock the thread too far off topic but an curious what bivy you use and how your experience has been with it. I'm looking to get one for use under my tarp during big season.

  14. #14
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    Default Klymit Inertia Pads

    The xframe pad sucks. I used it last year for two weeks and did not get a single good nights sleep. Now I have an air core which is a lot heavier but allows for a great night of rest. So if you want mine I will sell it for half price.

  15. #15
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    The one thing I can say about my inertia pad is that it is very narrow. I roll all around. My arms and knees end up on the ground. I'm 6'1' and the alignment for my shoulders just seems off to me.

  16. #16

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    One major question I have about the pad is does it increase the contact your bag has with the tent floor, and does that lead to moisture from the floor getting on the bag.

    OK 2 questions

  17. #17
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    The pad is designed to go inside of your sleeping bag so it would increase contact with the tent floor. This doesn't necessarily mean more moisture unless the tent floor is wet.

  18. #18
    Registered User Razor's Avatar
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    Actually the pad is designed to be outside the bag This lets the bag loft more ---theoretically the down is able to expand into the pockets thus more insulation between you and the ground. I think if you where in a wet environment ( tent without a floor ) it possibly could lead to more wet!On the other hand ,I use a Gossermer poly sheet for a groundcloth with a tarp and have not gotten wet.---

  19. #19
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    Default Klymit Inertia Pads

    I've always used it this way because it is narrow and i don't slide off of it if its inside my bag. Its only about an inch and a half thick so it doesn't take up too much space in the bag. The down is not being compressed in those loft pockets either way. I guess it's essentially the same thing if the down is under or over the pocket. Do a google image search and look at pictures of it in use. Probably at least 90% are inside the bag but I guess it's just a personal preference.

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