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  1. #21
    Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    If walking is good for your health, the postman would be immortal.

    Woo

  2. #22
    Wanna-be hiker trash Sarcasm the elf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Old Owl View Post
    Does that count as animal abuse?
    "This sucks and I love it"

    The ground's under my boots and not over my head, so it's a good day.

  3. #23
    Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    No but its demand's being moved to the humor forum. It's kind of up there with tickle me Elmo..
    If walking is good for your health, the postman would be immortal.

    Woo

  4. #24
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    Our family hikes with our Alaskan Husky, Sara, and, as Shelterbuilder pointed out, we always leash her in camp too. As a breed Huskies are nomadic and will often go chasing after the first thing that goes "peep" (gotta love all the AT chipmunks). After a full day of hiking, she just usually wants to eat her dinner, have a drink and hit the sack. Unless, of course, there are other people nearby. Then she wants to wag her tail and get some attention, which most are willing to provide. Could we take her off leash in camp? Probably. But a couple of times chasing a Husky through the woods quickly teaches you that an ounce of prevention is worth miles of cure.

    As to our particular approach, Sara is not a chewer so we don't have the same problems others have described with regard to night time tie outs. And we've found through experimentation that the right combo for her/us is her leash extended by about 10 feet (total of 15 or more) with whatever extra cordage we have on hand and clipped to a tree, our packs, the center pole of the tent, whatever. She won't pull on it except if she gets tangled up and runs out of cord (rarely an issue). With that length she can get up and move about freely and can come in and out of our tarp as she feels comfortable. She usually likes to sleep in between the kids on top of their bags. They get warm feet/heads and she gets a soft bed. Everybody wins!

  5. #25
    FarmerChef's Avatar
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    Our family hikes with our Alaskan Husky, Sara, and, as Shelterbuilder pointed out, we always leash her in camp too. As a breed Huskies are nomadic and will often go chasing after the first thing that goes "peep" (gotta love all the AT chipmunks). After a full day of hiking, she just usually wants to eat her dinner, have a drink and hit the sack. Unless, of course, there are other people nearby. Then she wants to wag her tail and get some attention, which most are willing to provide. Could we take her off leash in camp? Probably. But a couple of times chasing a Husky through the woods quickly teaches you that an ounce of prevention is worth miles of cure.

    As to our particular approach, Sara is not a chewer so we don't have the same problems others have described with regard to night time tie outs. And we've found through experimentation that the right combo for her/us is her leash extended by about 10 feet (total of 15 or more) with whatever extra cordage we have on hand and clipped to a tree, our packs, the center pole of the tent, whatever. She won't pull on it except if she gets tangled up and runs out of cord (rarely an issue). With that length she can get up and move about freely and can come in and out of our tarp as she feels comfortable. She usually likes to sleep in between the kids on top of their bags. They get warm feet/heads and she gets a soft bed. Everybody wins!

  6. #26
    Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    I had to revisit this - it just occurred to me that leashing a dog with a hammock is not going to work. the cords and guys would get tangled so quick.... Has anyone had experience with this?
    If walking is good for your health, the postman would be immortal.

    Woo

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by FarmerChef View Post
    Our family hikes with our Alaskan Husky, Sara, and, as Shelterbuilder pointed out, we always leash her in camp too. As a breed Huskies are nomadic and will often go chasing after the first thing that goes "peep" (gotta love all the AT chipmunks). After a full day of hiking, she just usually wants to eat her dinner, have a drink and hit the sack. Unless, of course, there are other people nearby. Then she wants to wag her tail and get some attention, which most are willing to provide. Could we take her off leash in camp? Probably. But a couple of times chasing a Husky through the woods quickly teaches you that an ounce of prevention is worth miles of cure.

    As to our particular approach, Sara is not a chewer so we don't have the same problems others have described with regard to night time tie outs. And we've found through experimentation that the right combo for her/us is her leash extended by about 10 feet (total of 15 or more) with whatever extra cordage we have on hand and clipped to a tree, our packs, the center pole of the tent, whatever. She won't pull on it except if she gets tangled up and runs out of cord (rarely an issue). With that length she can get up and move about freely and can come in and out of our tarp as she feels comfortable. She usually likes to sleep in between the kids on top of their bags. They get warm feet/heads and she gets a soft bed. Everybody wins!
    I too had a Husky,and yes they are a little nomadic,and stuborn,hard headed,and awfully snugable.bandit was a true husky in every sence,he pulled like no other I ever had,his lungs were large and he rarly tired,cool breed,strong as all.Use to use some 3/16 air craft cable for his tie-out,and he aventully broke it and I don't know how.Spectra may be the way to go.thanks for posting,I had all but forgotten that.cheers
    I hike for hikin'

  8. #28
    Registered User kayak karl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Old Owl View Post
    I had to revisit this - it just occurred to me that leashing a dog with a hammock is not going to work. the cords and guys would get tangled so quick.... Has anyone had experience with this?
    hi WOO my dog Kaia sleeps in the hammock (12'by 60" DIY of 1.9 coated nylon) or under it when it gets above freezing. her choice. she's hooked to me with a 4' leach. i hang 12 off ground so she can jump in and out. when we hike she sleeps all night and wakes at 5 am for her walk, same as at home. i've only had her out about 50 nites, but now that she is 2 1/2 she has calmed down. as a pup it was a tangled up mess in the hammock PS i don't hang during bug season so NO bugnet for her to claw.

    KK&K

    I'm so confused, I'm not sure if I lost my horse or found a rope.

  9. #29
    Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    oh wow - Im 229 now and hes 77 thats 306! i will give it a try tonight,
    If walking is good for your health, the postman would be immortal.

    Woo

  10. #30

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    Always tie your lead to your toe...

  11. #31
    Registered User scope's Avatar
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    I have a new pup and I'm reading this thread with interest as I've never taken a dog with me before on a hike. I figure I'll start bringing her on day hikes to see if she likes it and then move on to overnites if so.

    One thing strikes me here... lot of folks tethering to their wrists (and toe?). Maybe it just doesn't happen at night, but what if the dog is spooked or sees something to go after and does so full speed? Um, ouch!?! That's a bit of a rude awakening I could do without. I would think simply having a long leash to loop around a tree (I hammock) would be the best method - I can't imagine a reason to be personally tethered to your pooch, but if others disagree, let me know your reasons for doing so. Thx.
    "Come on sunshine, what can you show me
    Where can you take me to make me understand
    The wind can shake me, brothers forsake me
    The rain can touch me, but can I touch the rain"
    - Gordon Lightfoot

  12. #32
    Registered User kayak karl's Avatar
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    as WOO mentioned the problem is getting tangled in tie-outs of tarp or wrapping around tree. tarp won't be in porch mode every nite (i ALWAYS set up in storm mode). i have hooked to ridge line with prusik knot, but Kaia would get out one side and jump in other
    i assume this is about backpacking (not car camping). car camping she can be a handful as she hears other people talking into the wee hours. when i'm tired, she's tired also. she is trained not to chase. she will bark till i get up.
    I'm so confused, I'm not sure if I lost my horse or found a rope.

  13. #33
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    Leash until your dog begins to settle dwn to trail life. You'll need a leash to tie dog up when you enter restaurants stores, etc. Mnay people hike w/a dog and really enjoy the experience.
    "Something hidden. Go and find it. Go, and look behind the Ranges. Something lost behind the Ranges. Lost and waiting for you . . . Go!" (Rudyard Kipling)
    From SunnyWalker, SOBO CDT hiker starting June 2014.
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  14. #34
    Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    Yea well I am here to report Rugby will never make it inside a Hennessy - he did park directly under the HH and nothing happened. Its all good, he was happy.
    If walking is good for your health, the postman would be immortal.

    Woo

  15. #35
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    I am reminded of a comic my wife cliped out of the news paper.A couple is lying in there very large XL King size bed,with about 5 feet between them,one kid is all elbows on the fathers side,and the mother has the other kid and a dog lying all over her.No matter what the sleeping arangements are,in the dogs mind,they are right there in it.Awesome!
    I hike for hikin'

  16. #36

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    Leash your dog. See it as a liability issue. I just gave you the solution

  17. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Velvet Gooch View Post
    Leash your dog. See it as a liability issue. I just gave you the solution
    Backing down here.

    The OP seemed unsure of her animal's behavior in the given scenario. Since she had to ask, I immediately questioned her mastery of the animal.

    I'm neutral on the topic despite my reply. If handler and dog are well disciplined, hike/sleep with it off-leash (where legal). However, if in doubt, err on the side of caution.

    I still consider it a liability issue; one can't put a dog through every scenario it might face while it's off-leash. Know your animal

  18. #38
    Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    Uh well the test is in my back yard, lets move on.
    If walking is good for your health, the postman would be immortal.

    Woo

  19. #39

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    My lab Mouse Hunter (aka Bandit) and I sleep in a two man tent. He was taught tent manners and is not allowed in the tent until his bedding is down. Then he is only allowed on his bedding or mine so his nails don't rip the floor of the tent. My pack covers the remaining 1/4 open space so he pretty much can't get to the ten floor anyway. I always sleep in the tent and avoid sleeping in the shelter as I don't believe a dog should be up on the shelter flooring. So, no reason to leash at night. I do however leash prior to entering the shelter area and tie him to either a tree or my pack while doing chores. He doesn't pull while on leash so there is no danger for the tree. If I had a leash puller, I'd stick to just tying him to my pack. When in hostel's, if the dog is allow inside the hostel, I tie his leash to my wrist while I sleep. That way if he gets up I'll know it, especially if he is getting up because someone else is getting up. We don't need any 'dog noises' at 2 a.m. right? Unless of course it is a bear, right!

    BTW, my dog has the name Mouse Hunter because he loves to hunt mice at the shelters. Now there's an added benefit.

  20. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velvet Gooch View Post
    Backing down here.

    The OP seemed unsure of her animal's behavior in the given scenario. Since she had to ask, I immediately questioned her mastery of the animal.

    I'm neutral on the topic despite my reply. If handler and dog are well disciplined, hike/sleep with it off-leash (where legal). However, if in doubt, err on the side of caution.

    I still consider it a liability issue; one can't put a dog through every scenario it might face while it's off-leash. Know your animal
    LOL, you guys- because I "know my animal," I know that I need to have her contained/leashed - not just at night, but all the time- which is why I asked the question in the first place. My "mastery" over her is pretty limited; she's the most human-like dog I've ever encountered, but she's sweet and silent and a very agreeable companion, once I stopped expecting her to listen to me. (If you think that makes me a bad dog owner, that's okay.) In any case, she's always leashed, both because she's a runner and because it's the law practically everywhere and, even if my dog doesn't obey commands, I do.

    Also, I have an update. I took her on a weekend trip earlier this month, and everything worked out fine. I hooked her leash around a tree while I was doing camp chores, which she didn't mind as long as she was close to me, and she happily settled into the tent (half on my pad and half on hers) when it was time to read/sleep. So, everything worked out, and I'll definitely be taking her out on the trail again. If you see a curly-tailed red dog on a green leash, make sure to say hello; her name's Sarah.

    Thanks again to everyone for all the input!

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