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  1. #1
    Registered User Excell's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Preparation Hike

    So.. I went to the supermarket and bought 8 days worth of food. I packed it all up and am getting ready to hike the Lone Star Hiking Trail. I figure this will be a good test run for my SOBO June 2nd. The Lone Star Trail is 96 miles long. I want to get a handle on the 100 mile wilderness! haha. Make sure I am buying enough food and all my gear is square for the trip.

    What kinds of things are y'all doing to prepare for your hike? Always love getting new ideas on preparation techniques!!

  2. #2
    Registered User rbills's Avatar
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    You're fortunate to have that kind of free time before starting the trail! I'm just doing some day hikes and a couple overnighters just to make sure that some of my new gear is going to work before committing to 100+ miles with it. I'm also doing longer runs to try and toughen up my feet a bit. I think most of my "getting prepared" physically will be done on the trail, unfortunately.

  3. #3
    Registered User Excell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbills View Post
    You're fortunate to have that kind of free time before starting the trail! I'm just doing some day hikes and a couple overnighters just to make sure that some of my new gear is going to work before committing to 100+ miles with it. I'm also doing longer runs to try and toughen up my feet a bit. I think most of my "getting prepared" physically will be done on the trail, unfortunately.

    I do feel lucky to have this time! I usually make a plan for working out and getting ready better.. however.. things always come up. In the end I am sure I will be getting prepared on the trail as well! haha. My hikes are also pretty flat. Houston doesn't have any hills. So if your day hikes have hills I am sure that you are going to be better off than me. Best of luck!!

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    A 96 mile trail is a good start for training. It'll help with your whole routine of setting up camp, making meals, packing, etc. Since it's flat, if you have small hills nearby, just walk up and down many times, otherwise do lots of stairs.
    Nothing can prepare you for black flies in Maine (NH and VT), try to hike when they're not there

  5. #5
    Registered User Excell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowleopard View Post
    A 96 mile trail is a good start for training. It'll help with your whole routine of setting up camp, making meals, packing, etc. Since it's flat, if you have small hills nearby, just walk up and down many times, otherwise do lots of stairs.
    Nothing can prepare you for black flies in Maine (NH and VT), try to hike when they're not there

    I hope that I work out all of my gear kinks! Since I have no hills, I have been going to the YMCA in order to get some stairs in! haha. As for the black flies.. I have a bug net and a fifth of something special! haha. JK. But I do have a bug net!!

  6. #6
    Registered User Excell's Avatar
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    The trail was closed. So I couldn't walk it. Instead I decide to walk from one town to the next. I put in about 90 miles on the road. And boy, Texas was hot! haha. It was a good trip over all. I got to learn about how my feet get sore, blister, heal, and repeat. Additionally, I learned all about my gear. I used everything and didn't think I needed more. The only things I didn't use obviously were my colder weather items. But it was all good. I wrote down a bunch of notes or lessons learned. I will post more later.

  7. #7

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    Hey Excell - I was just looking into the Lone Star Trail as well. Got most of my gear and bought the guidebook, went to look something up on the net about something mentioned in the book and discovered that it's closed due to the "widow-makers" the drought last year caused. I wish we had more trails here in Texas. I'm not planning my trip until next year (or maybe the following year if things don't go quite as planned) so I'm hoping the trail is open again by early next year so I can get all those kinks worked out as well.

    Best of luck on your hike!

  8. #8
    Registered User Excell's Avatar
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    LilredTX- the lone star trail is well marked. I went in it earlier in the year. However, only a small section. I seemed appropriate though because it gives you a long distance practice trail. I wish you the best of luck. You can always read my journals for more info on my plans. Enjoy.

  9. #9
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    excell- where are you going to post your journal? (link?) I'll probably be 2-3 weeks behind you... wouldn't mind reading you journal in case there is some useful info.

    from Houston myself, leaving around June 13th up to 27th...not sure yet.

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