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Thread: A Tyvek kilt?

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    Registered User KristalB's Avatar
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    Post A Tyvek kilt?

    Has anyone ever made a Tyvek kilt (similar to the CloudKilt By ZPacks) to wear instead of rain pants? I have some extra Tyvek and I'm hankerin' to make somethin'.

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    Go for it.

    Are you going to do a plain tarp kilt, or add some pleats too?

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    ULA also has a rain kilt, if you need more inspiration.

    http://www.ula-equipment.com/rainkilt.asp

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    If I were going to do this I'd make an attempt to break the tyvek in a little bit...if you crumple it up over and over it will eventually have a texture more like cloth and be a lot less stiff.

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    Or build it with tyvek 1443 which is already more clothlike and sews better too. It's not as waterproof, but a kilt doesn't really need to be...well, until you sit.

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    I have yet to do this, but have read in different places online that you can wash normal Tyvek a couple of times (in a standard washing machine) and it softens up while still maintaining it's properties.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Winds View Post
    I have yet to do this, but have read in different places online that you can wash normal Tyvek a couple of times (in a standard washing machine) and it softens up while still maintaining it's properties.
    You are so right, Winds. I did it for my ground cloth and worked out great.

    I found the video (below) kilt making and the lady says she uses 8 YARDS of fabric. Thinking I may need to hit the laundry mat to wash THAT much Tyvek. Lol.

    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...G-mXCnE4zLU6aQ

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    I didn't know that tyvek came in plaid!!

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    That is a very great idea thank you. Why did'nt I think of that. IMO I think you should leave the Logo out, as it would be much more stylish.

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    She was but a wee lass and wore a Tyvek kilt.......


    Yep, has a ring to it.

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    Found a seamstress, found Tyvek at Lowes, perm marker for making plaid design. Yes, the consept seems to be coming together. Hopefully the kilt will be finished before my son and I leave for our 82 mile hike in 3 weeks. Thanks for the encouragement and ideas, y'all.

    Spokes, I've been looking for a trail name. Haha I like how u r thinking.

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    I love it! Sounds like a Project Runway challenge. Please post pics when it's ready.

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    I'd maybe avoid 1433 tyvek, that really isn't even water resistant, if you hold it up to light and use a magnifier, it has actual holes in it. I think I looked up the msds on that, and it had really no functional water resistance/hydrostatic head rating if I remember right. But one of the normal tyveks, that are impermeable, would probably be pretty good. In fact, this is one of the few reasons I can think of to use tyvek for anything I'd bring with my backpacking. Except maybe a very heavy ground cover.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harald Hope View Post
    I'd maybe avoid 1433 tyvek, that really isn't even water resistant, if you hold it up to light and use a magnifier, it has actual holes in it. I think I looked up the msds on that, and it had really no functional water resistance/hydrostatic head rating if I remember right. But one of the normal tyveks, that are impermeable, would probably be pretty good. In fact, this is one of the few reasons I can think of to use tyvek for anything I'd bring with my backpacking. Except maybe a very heavy ground cover.
    Worn in a kilt configuration, the 1433 might be OK as it should shed the water. Homewrap would work better, but be heavier. Homewrap makes a great tarp for those who can't afford Silnylon or Cuben fiber. Its a tad heavier, but still pretty light for the price. I've used my 9x6 (12.5 oz with 14 tie outs) in winds and fairly heavy rain, still working good for a $10 tarp.

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    Now all you need is a Tyvek Sporran to go with it!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Odd Man Out View Post
    Now all you need is a Tyvek Sporran to go with it!
    sil stuff sack

    geek

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    Given that PU coated 1.9 oz nylon weighs less than tyvek of any sort I believe, and is water proof, and costs maybe 3 or 4 a yard from somewhere like diygearsupply, I can actually see no reason at all to use tyvek for anything at this point. At about 2.2 oz yard nylon like that is plenty strong. And sews better, holds seams better, resists water better, etc. To me the whole tyvek thing was just a nice thing to try but really, it's not a very good material for what myog types used it for in their experiments, though the experimenting is always fun. I have to admit that I'd read all these comments about it, then ordered my first piece, for a ground cover, which I'll probably never use because it's absurdly heavy. Can't actually figure out why anyone uses it over 70d PU coated nylon to be honest, except I guess it's reasonably durable over time, but so is 70d nylon.

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    Everyone has their preferences and I certainly won't try to talk anyone into using Tyvek. I, too, prefer silnylon, but I will share the reasons why I use Tyvek for some of my projects. The main reasons are that it is reasonably light (Homewrap is 1.7 oz per yard. Not quite 1.3 oz silnylon, but still decent and there are lighter Tyveks although I've never tried them). My 9x6 Tyvek tarp weighs 12.5 oz with all the tie outs and reinforcements, not too bad. I find Tyvek much easier to work with than nylon, especially for those of us who are "sewing challenged" as it can be glued with good strength, its easy to reinforce, and if you screw up you aren't out much money. Its also a whole lot cheaper than silnylon, especially when you bum some from the foreman at a construction site, which I've done. Even if you buy it, its about 1/3 to 1/2 the price of silnylon. Certainly, all things being equal, I'd choose Silnylon, but for stuff like this kilt project Tyvek works great. I bought a roll to make boat covers for my boat and its working fantastic for that. It holds up a lot better than the blue poly tarps I was using. Regarding water resistance, Tyvek is essentially water proof under real world conditions. I had a pool develop in the middle of my Tyvek boat cover after it rained while I was gone on vacation a few weeks ago. I used a 5 gallon bucket to bail out the water and it came out to approximately 40 gallons (roughly 330 lbs) suspended 1 foot over the floor in the center of my boat, held up only by the Homewrap for 8 days and not a drop went through. I was surprised that my eight glue on tie outs held under that much weight. But the point is that it is unlikely that I will ever encounter the need for more water resistance than that. Finally, having the roll at home makes it very convenient for MYOG projects. I just cut a piece from the roll as I need it. I'm working on a Tyvek solo tent/bivy right now, which I never would have started had I not had a roll laying around. My first effort is about 2 1/2' tall at the head (less than I wanted but its OK, I will make the next one taller) and it looks like its going to come it at about 16-17 ounces using trekking poles (not counted in the weight) as the frame. I'll use what I learned to build the next one.

    I agree fully that Tyvek is heavier than needed for a ground cloth, as you usually don't need the durability for that purpose. Homewrap weighs .205 oz per square foot, and a 3x8 Tyvek ground cloth weighs 4.92 oz. Cheap plastic dropcloths or Polycryo weigh less than 1/2 that, although I use my Tyvek one if sleeping under the tarp with my inflatable pad as I want the puncture resistance.

    So thats my take on Tyvek. I know its not for everyone, but it lets me toy with MYOG projects without risking too much money and I sometimes end up with some pretty nice gear for my efforts.

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    Good luck with your MYOG adventures, DaFireMedic. Sounds like you could have your own gear business. I'm excited about staying dry(er) in downpours with the kilt that's being made. I too will have a roll of Tyvek around the house to play with after this is done. Thanks for the encouragement.

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    DaFireMedic, thanks for the specifics, well reasoned stuff always trumps less well reasoned stuff, I was off on the weights per yard, let me add one more possible benefit now that you mention it, sun resistance? I don't know that, but I do know nylon eventually dissolves in the sun, especially the light 30d stuff. I wasn't actually referring to silnylon, cheapest that one is is around 5 a yard, and that's often very low quality with a low hydrostatic head, I was referring to the coated 1.9 oz 70d, which weighs a bit more than tyvek housewrap based on your measurements, so that's good to see. 70d now can be gotten for 3, 4 a yard from diygearsupply, plus of course shipping. Do you have any experience with the tyvek they use in for example priority mail envelopes? It's much thinner and lighter, and seems to be waterproof, but that's all I know about it, I use that in little projects but have no idea what it's called in terms of actually sourcing it. Now 1433 tyvek is another matter, that one you can literally see the holes in if you hold it up to the light, I would never use that one for anything. So I guess a housewrap tvvek ground cover in fact would weigh less than a coated 70d, at around 2.2 oz a yard, I take back what I said in that case, now I see why they use it for that. polycro stuff is nice but is very light, I have used it and don't mind it, but it's a pain in the wind.

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