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  1. #1
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    Default need advice for a quilt?

    So I have been contemplating making my own underquilt out of an old sleeping bag or two( lafuma or a north face). I have never used a u.q. or seen one but would like to eliminate my cold spots and loose the pad. Here were some questions I had.... Is there a special thread I should use to sew with? Will I need to sew some kind of a ribbon around the edges to keep it sealed and if so what would you suggest? Refilling excess down? Also is it better to have your baffles running the length of the hammock or vise versa? I'm sure there is a lot I left out. Any local hangers that could possibly show me their rig would be awesome.

  2. #2
    Registered User gunner76's Avatar
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    Default

    Do not use cotton. Gutterman is favorite thread. Grossgrain is often used to finish the edges. Check out hammockforums.net DIY section.

    One great source for DIY supplies is http://www.backwoodsdaydreamer.com/products-page/
    Hammock Hanger by choice

    Warbonnet BlackBird 1.7 dbl


    www.neusioktrail.org

    Bears love people, they say we taste just like chicken.

  3. #3
    Registered User Nutbrown's Avatar
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    Run the baffles lengthwise... from foot to head. Otherwise all the stuffing falls to the bottom. Your crack will be very warm if you run the baffles sideways. +2 on gutterman thread. Poly, and high quality without going excessive. I didn't use grossgrain to seal the edges, just sewed em together. Grossgrain looks nice, but isn't necessary. Def take a peek at hammockforums diy. More pics than you want and even more opinions

  4. #4

    Default

    is the old bag synthetic?? I was thinking about putting down in a synthetic bag until I learned I would have to sew baffles in it. Then I realized I might as well start from scratch.

  5. #5
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    Well it was a down sleeping bag but have come to realize sewing machines and myself are not to be in the same proximity. Now I am more interested in buying one although not really excited about the cost. So I am back with a few more questions: I think I'm liking the warbonnet yeti but am not sure which one to purchase. I plan on useing it on my sobo starting in July. With only a $25 difference and overfill options will the 3 season hold true to 20*, would overfill be advised?
    Also would anybody maybe have a uq for sale?

  6. #6
    CDT Section Hiker
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    06-27-2004
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    Default

    I have asked the same question, you ask.

    For comparisons: Look at a number of different brands that claim 20 F or 15 F. I would look at the fill-weight of the down: 550-fill, 800-fill, 900-fill. Next, I would look at ounces of fill.

    I am a warm sleeper. Are you?

    For example, I have a 9 oz 900-fill "half bag" rated for 20-degrees that is much too warm at 50 F and too warm at 40 F.

    Next, make a choice based on useage: Do you want to use the 20 F rated quilt at 40 F? 35 F? 30 F? or 15 F or less?

    If you want a useable temperature range lower, will you wear your longjohns for sleep wear? I carry silkweights for sleepwear. If much colder, I can extend the useable range to lower temperatures by having warmer sleepwear. Some use down booties to extend the useable range of their sleeping bag or sleeping quilt.

    If you want a useable temperature range higher, use a drawcord and Omni Tape sold by Jacks R Better for example to make a footbox. It doesn't snag on clothing as much as ordinary velcro. Many UQ have a built-in drawcord. If not, ask for one.

    The footbox is the first thing to make a sleeping quilt too warm. Nevertheless, you can stick one or two feet with socks or even down slipper-booties just right for the temperatures outside.

    These are some of the reasons, it is difficult to answer your question.

    Maybe people will tell you their experience, first saying if they are a warm sleeper or a cold sleeper.

  7. #7
    Registered User Danl's Avatar
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    Default

    I like the peapod (http://www.speerhammocks.com/Products/PeaPod.htm) design but didn't like any of the prices of any of the uq's. This being because i have a seamstress in the house. We went down and found a bolt of fleece on the discontinued rack. Took the zipper out of an old sleeping bag. We measured and cut and cut and measured and it works really good .
    I start out the Day with nothing and by the end of the Day I still have most of it.

  8. #8
    CDT Section Hiker
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    Default

    If you are going with down, look at sewn-thru or karo construction.

    Sewn-thru will need sufficient height allowed to be warm. For example, I think 2-inches is not enough for 20 F if sewn-thru.

    Some down construction allows you to shift the down where you want it. Karo construction seems ideal, to me.

    If you are going with synthetic, there is a synthetic quilt offered in the for sale section. It is constructed so you can add or remove layers of insulation. This is easy because Climashield APEX only has to be attached at the edges. You can't beat the price.

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