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  1. #1

    Default Wilderness First Aid

    I just took a wilderness first aid class through the SOLO School in Conway, NH in prep for my 2013 hike. I thought it was terrific - it went well above and beyond Red Cross training I've taken in the past. It's apparently the approved (beginning) training program for all White Mountain rescue folks, and required for AMC volunteers. If anyone is close to NH, it's well worth your time. It was offered at the AMC lodge in Crawford Notch, which is nice. (Yes, it's not cheap, but lodging and meals were included with class price.)

    As a side perk, we got to watch a helicopter making repeated trips taking summer stuff up to Mitzpah hut from just north of the Lodge, including a netted bundle of mattresses stacked right next to our conference center. (Took them during lunch, and we were starved, so we didn't see the pick up, darn it!) When I left for the day I wondered what the two 100 lb propane tanks were doing in a field next to the road. Duh - it also brought the empties down from the hut.

    We did miss two terrific days of hiking, but we were outside a lot, so it wasn't so bad.
    Quilteresq
    2013, hopefully.

  2. #2
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    That's so cool! But will your first aid kit still fit inside a ziplock bag after taking the course?

  3. #3
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    Qesq,can you please tell us what is thee most up to date method for treating a snake bite with invenomnation(if thats even a word)?I have always known it to be Shock.
    I hike for hikin'

  4. #4

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    Whoops - it was White Mountain training - snake bites weren't covered, as there aren't any poisonous snakes up here. Hypothermia and frostbite were covered well, however. The week long Wilderness First Responder course might do snake bites. I'm not planning on changing my first aid kit, except to make sure I have the Benadryl packed in it - splint making out of sticks and packed gear was covered. as well as when to send for a full crew for evacuation (back injuries of ANY kind, broken legs, and obviously when you have an unresponsive victim.)

    And I do have one silk triangle bandage in my kit in lieu of a bandana. You can always find more duct tape from other hikers, though. Pretty sure it would substitute pretty well for those triangle bandages.
    Quilteresq
    2013, hopefully.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by quilteresq View Post
    Whoops - it was White Mountain training - snake bites weren't covered, as there aren't any poisonous snakes up here. Hypothermia and frostbite were covered well, however. The week long Wilderness First Responder course might do snake bites. I'm not planning on changing my first aid kit, except to make sure I have the Benadryl packed in it - splint making out of sticks and packed gear was covered. as well as when to send for a full crew for evacuation (back injuries of ANY kind, broken legs, and obviously when you have an unresponsive victim.)

    And I do have one silk triangle bandage in my kit in lieu of a bandana. You can always find more duct tape from other hikers, though. Pretty sure it would substitute pretty well for those triangle bandages.
    Well it sounds like you had a wonderful time.Taking that class or the like is something that I will look to do as well,thank you for your reply.
    I hike for hikin'

  6. #6

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    According to the film, I can chuck the Extractor. For the types of snakes on the AT, the best advice is now to carry the EpiPen.

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