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solidude
12-17-2013, 14:33
I currently have a 2005 NorthFace Blaze 20 degree Synthetic sleeping bag that weighs in at 48 ounces. I have been down to 5 degrees in this bag and honestly did not have any issues. I am wanting to tru to lighten my pack but at the same time I don't want to sacrifice comfort or my budget. I primarily 3 season section hike the southern AT (GA, TN, NC). I am planning a section hike for 2014 through the Whites in NH.

So what I am looking for is a 20 degree DriDown (or something simular) weighing in as close to 16 ounces as possible. I do prefer a mummy style with a hood. And budget is under $400. Any suggestions???

Thanks to everyone in advance for helping me with this!

- Solidude

Namtrag
12-17-2013, 15:06
Not sure you are going to get a full sleeping bag rated 20 that weighs less than 2lbs. Even the Montbell UL Super Hugger is 2 lbs and it's a great bag. Even the pricier Western Mountaineering 20 degree bag I looked at, which was a little over $400, was just a little under 2 lbs.

You might want to take a look at a top quilt from Enlightened Equipment, Jacks R Better, or Underground Quilts. They all have 20 degree-ish quilts at about 24 oz or so. That's the direction I am leaning for my next sleeping "bag". Just use a decent pad and a top quilt. There are other quilt companies, but they are closing in on your top price range. The three I listed are in the 250 ish range.

HooKooDooKu
12-17-2013, 15:41
While I'm not a sleeping bag expert, the lightest weight sleeping bags I've come across are the Marmot Plasma series utilizing 900 fill power goose down.

But even the Plasma 30 comes in at 23oz, while the Plasme 15 is 30oz. Both of those usually come in at around $450 to $500.

Dogwood
12-17-2013, 15:49
If you are able to find an 20* accurately temp rated(EN13537) down sleeping bag w/hood at or very near 16 ozs at $400 PLEASE let me know! I don't know of any. The lightest 20* down sleeping bags w/ hood I know are about 1 lb 7-9 oz (23 -25 oz) and they exceed your $400 budget. I suspect the closer to that wt goal you are going to get in a 20* down sleeping bag w/ hood the higher you'll go over that $400 sleeping bag budget. You may have to readjust your combination of requirements/priorities/goals.

If you prioritize wt and are willing to accede some features, requirements, and are possibly open to rethinking sleep systems you can begin by looking at these UL manufacturers: ZPacks 20* sleeping bag, http://www.zpacks.com/quilts.shtml , Enlightened Equipment quilts http://www.enlightenedequipment.com/?product=enigma-20, Katabatic http://katabaticgear.com/shop/alsek-sleeping-bag/ , Nunatak http://nunatakusa.com/site07/arc_products/arc_alpinist.htm

There are other sleeping bag and quilt manufacturers that might meet your goals but I don't know of any that meet ALL your goals.

CalebJ
12-17-2013, 16:00
What about a Western Mountaineering Summerlite (19oz for a 6' bag) with a 30* rating, then adding layers or a liner as needed for colder trips? I have that plus a Feathered Friends 0* bag. Outside of December-February, it's very rare that I need the 0* option.

solidude
12-17-2013, 17:35
Thank you all!
I will definitely look into the Western Mountaineering Summerlite (19oz), the Marmot Plasma 30 (24oz), the Mountain Hardware Phantom 32 (22oz), and the ZPacks 20 degree (16.7oz).
It looks like to get the weight where I want it, I will have to stick around the 30 degree area which is ok because I am a 3 season section hiker anyways.
If any of you have any reviews on these mentioned items or other items close to these, I would love to know more on the products.

Thanks!
- Solidude

minda
12-17-2013, 17:47
I picked up the Sea to Summit Micro II last spring. It is lightweight and packs down to almost nothing. It's a full zip sleeping bag with a drawstring toe so that you can open & use it as a quilt. I've loved it.

Dogwood
12-17-2013, 17:54
3 season east coast section hiker rolling with a 30* bag/quilt is most likely going to require increasing your overall warmth while sleeping. How you do that is another thread. Shoulder season eastcoast bags in themselves(March, April, Nov, early Dec you'd prolly best be going with something around 20* rating.

solidude
12-17-2013, 18:01
3 season east coast section hiker rolling with a 30* bag/quilt is most likely going to require increasing your overall warmth while sleeping. How you do that is another thread. Shoulder season eastcoast bags in themselves(March, April, Nov, early Dec you'd prolly best be going with something around 20* rating.
I would sleep with base layers in the 30* bag if needed, and if I do any colder trips, I still have my NorthFace 20* and a Sea to Summit Reactor Thermolite. But honestly by three seasons, I mainly go late spring, early or late summer, and early fall.
Thanks Dogwood !

solidude
12-17-2013, 18:02
I picked up the Sea to Summit Micro II last spring. It is lightweight and packs down to almost nothing. It's a full zip sleeping bag with a drawstring toe so that you can open & use it as a quilt. I've loved it.
I will check that out.

CalebJ
12-17-2013, 18:09
I can't speak to the other options, but the Summerlite has been my go to bag for about five years now. It's kept me warm into the high 20's. Packs small and has shown no sign of reduced performance or other issues in that time. I don't even bother with a stuff sack on most trips. It zips directly into my bivy and the pad goes inside the sleeping bag. The three put together rolls up easily and drops into the bottom of my 34 liter pack with lots of room to spare.

You mentioned the newer moisture resistant down in the OP. I haven't tested that up close, but my first impression is that it's a gimmick. Keeping the bag dry should be something you take very seriously, and if you do so properly you'll never have an issue with traditional down.

4eyedbuzzard
12-17-2013, 19:04
Another option/possible suggestion (also WM): I've been using a WM Caribou for several years now 3 seasons in NH (that is NH 3 seasons which is 6 months May - October ;). It weighs 21 oz (6 ft model) and is a sewn-thru 35F rated bag, and I've been comfortable in it at 30F with a light base layer on. I was looking at the WM Highlite (16 oz), also a 35F bag, but I found it a bit too snug in the shoulders for me and it only had a half-zipper which limits it as a summer bag IMO (I like be able to open it fully for temp regulation, and to use it like a quilt too). The girth measurements for comparison are shdr/hip/foot - 59"/51"/38" for the Highlite and 64"/55"/39" for the Caribou. Not a huge amount, but enough to make a difference in comfort. I'd add that the microfiber shell is exceptional. I have accidentally spilled water on it twice and it beads right up and runs off with no water getting through the shell.

Dogwood
12-17-2013, 20:51
I would sleep with base layers in the 30* bag if needed, and if I do any colder trips, I still have my NorthFace 20* and a Sea to Summit Reactor Thermolite. But honestly by three seasons, I mainly go late spring, early or late summer, and early fall.
Thanks Dogwood !

I see the writing on the wall. If you're kit wt conscious and get a new high end really UL down sleeping bag/quilt in the 30-35* range you will prolly hate lugging around the bulkier 3 lb NF Synthetic sleeping bag. It may even affect your decision whether to carry it or not. May I suggest you don't take the sleeping bag/quilt path I took! Whatever new bag you drop the $400 on keep in mind how that choice affects your desired future sleeping bag/quilt/sleep system line up! I'm telling ya IF you get increasingly wt conscious in the future you're not going to want to lug around a 3 lb 20* synthetic bag for long not when you can get a synthetic w/ that temp rating/range that's easily 10+ oz lighter and IF you decide you can work with down bags/quilts on most hikes. Choose wisely!

Dogwood
12-17-2013, 21:14
That 5" difference in shoulder widths and the 4" difference in the hips between the WM Highlite and WM Caribou is HUGE IMO. The WM 35* Highlite is one of my goto conventional down sleeping bags. I have the Long at 17 oz. I'm on my third WM Highlite. I regularly can take it down to about 22* while wearing sleeping layers, gloves, beanie(balaclava/sherpa hat), etc and a Cocoon silk liner under an open tarp but prefer not to on a regular basis more on the infrequent basis. The Caribou is cavernous compared to the Highlite measurements. Was ready to pull the trigger on a long Valandre Mirage w/ the short zip and when I demoed it it too seemed cavernous with its shouder and hip measuremnents. Couldn't keep it.

I would LOVE to be able say I'm a proud owner of a Feathered Friends Hummingbird UL but it aint happening, even with my medium width(ectomorph shape) shoulders because of the 58" shoulder girth is too tight for side sleeping FOR ME. Had to bump it up to a LONG FF Swallow UL. Especially as a BIG hiker, and with those anal UL Cottage Gear Manufacturers attempting to shave off grams, you better take careful note of shoulder and hip girths! That certainly applies to quilt manufacturers as well!

4eyedbuzzard
12-17-2013, 22:11
. . . with those anal UL Cottage Gear Manufacturers attempting to shave off grams, you better take careful note of shoulder and hip girths! That certainly applies to quilt manufacturers as well!

Yeah, at 6'0" 190lbs (and most people say I have a slender/athletic build) I am way too confined (can't move arms enough to operate zipper) in a lot of the UL mummy bags being manufactured that have been trimmed down at every dimension to achieve the lowest possible weight. Plus, if a bag is too tight it actually reduces the loft and warmth. I have to wonder if some of these sizes are due to manufacturers wanting to advertise the lowest weight to us "gram weenie hikers"? At some point, you have to be realistic that the absolute lowest weight gear isn't any good if it doesn't fit your purpose - and especially if it doesn't fit your body. The 5" more in width plus the full length zipper added 5 oz to my carried weight over the Highlite - but it actually fit well and was perfect for a "3 season New England" bag. With a medium weight base layer, socks, hat, etc., I think it would keep me warm down to about 20F if needed. Add that I got the Caribou new for just over $200 during a winter closeout sale (pulled the trigger quickly - they were sold out of all their WM bags within a few hours).

solidude
12-18-2013, 00:02
Please rest assure to know that I am not a "gram wennie hiker" nor really weight conscious. I have sectioned hike the lower AT for over 20 years with all kind of gear from army issue to Coleman/Walmart to now trying to build up a nice over all system.

4eyedbuzzard
12-18-2013, 00:33
Please rest assure to know that I am not a "gram wennie hiker" nor really weight conscious. I have sectioned hike the lower AT for over 20 years with all kind of gear from army issue to Coleman/Walmart to now trying to build up a nice over all system.Wasn't using gram weenie in a derogatory sense. More in the way UL equipment manufacturers see avid hikers as consumers - looking to shed every ounce possible - which most of us are. And given that you are looking for a "20 degree DriDown (or something simular) weighing in as close to 16 ounces as possible", you are definitely weight conscious and part of that target consumer group. And part of that nice overall system you are trying to build is light weight for a given performance level.

squeezebox
12-18-2013, 07:30
I'm going to sell my rei sub kilo rated 20* , too narrow for me.

daddytwosticks
12-18-2013, 08:11
Yeah, at 6'0" 190lbs (and most people say I have a slender/athletic build) I am way too confined (can't move arms enough to operate zipper) in a lot of the UL mummy bags being manufactured that have been trimmed down at every dimension to achieve the lowest possible weight. Plus, if a bag is too tight it actually reduces the loft and warmth. I have to wonder if some of these sizes are due to manufacturers wanting to advertise the lowest weight to us "gram weenie hikers"? At some point, you have to be realistic that the absolute lowest weight gear isn't any good if it doesn't fit your purpose - and especially if it doesn't fit your body. The 5" more in width plus the full length zipper added 5 oz to my carried weight over the Highlite - but it actually fit well and was perfect for a "3 season New England" bag. With a medium weight base layer, socks, hat, etc., I think it would keep me warm down to about 20F if needed. Add that I got the Caribou new for just over $200 during a winter closeout sale (pulled the trigger quickly - they were sold out of all their WM bags within a few hours). Had the Caribou long. It didn't keep me warm enough. Went with a 6 foot Megalite. I'm at six foot even in height and it fit me great! Way better and warmer for a slight penalty in weight. My only gripe? Wish it had a draft collar. :)