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Conure
02-04-2014, 18:49
I'm curious to know how many people carry some form of sheath knife with them on an AT thru, or any extended hike on the AT? If you do, what size, type, and where do you carry it?

aficion
02-04-2014, 18:56
My non-folding cutting tool is an ultralight Firestone hand axe. I carry it concealed so folks won't think I'm a creep.

winger
02-04-2014, 19:53
EZEE Izula.

kayak karl
02-04-2014, 19:55
http://www.tacticalwholesalers.com/Hartsook-Neck-Knife-S30V-Black-Oxide-Coating-Nylon-Sheat_p_65914.html

http://www.tacticalwholesalers.com/assets/images/isimages/MO860BKS.jpg

MuddyWaters
02-04-2014, 20:38
There are quite a few states that have blade length restrictions, between 3-5".
In some states you need a carry permit to carry a knife with a blade length over X, same as a handgun. Whether concealed or not. Some make exceptions for people engaged in travel to and from hunting and fishing sites.


One point, is if if looks like a weapon, its generally considered a weapon. If it looks like a kitchen knife, then it may not be considered as a weapon.

Think small. There is nothing you need a large knife for. Theres hardly anything you need a knife for at all.

Hikes in Rain
02-04-2014, 20:43
Used to. Realized I wasn't using it. Same with my favorite Gerber folder. Wasn't using it. I was using the little Swiss Army knife, the one that looks like an old fashioned Scout knife. Same one I carry all the time anyway. Cutting cheese and sausage, whittling fuzz sticks, and so forth. So......

Meriadoc
02-04-2014, 21:18
Mora classic. Light weight. Sharp. Good for cord and cheese. Unnecessary but fun. Until I lost it. Somewhere.

moldy
02-04-2014, 21:20
It's one of the ways you can tell a hiker from a car camper.

aficion
02-04-2014, 21:23
It's one of the ways you can tell a hiker from a car camper.

Yeah you will find the real hikers in a hostel braggin about how light they travel.

Valley Girl
02-04-2014, 21:28
Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade

Hey if I survive a fall from a cliff I will be able to make a ladder to get back up:banana

jimmyjam
02-04-2014, 21:30
Between springer and NOC you will see machetes and big bowies and bear gryllis knives. Just the mini swiss for me.

Kc Fiedler
02-04-2014, 21:34
There are quite a few states that have blade length restrictions, between 3-5".
In some states you need a carry permit to carry a knife with a blade length over X, same as a handgun. Whether concealed or not. Some make exceptions for people engaged in travel to and from hunting and fishing sites.


One point, is if if looks like a weapon, its generally considered a weapon. If it looks like a kitchen knife, then it may not be considered as a weapon.

Think small. There is nothing you need a large knife for. Theres hardly anything you need a knife for at all.

I've heard conflicting information about open carrying a blade. The most reliable information I've gotten on the subject is from a very close friend in law enforcement back in MI. He assured me that it is perfectly legal to open carry any length of blade, technically speaking you could walk down Main Street carrying a Katana. Could you still get cited for disturbing the peace or something similar? Probably.

Exceptions include double edged blades, butterfly knives, brass knuckles, and fully spring actuated blades.

I carry a victorinox classic on the AT. Very light, never need a knife any bigger, the scissors help with various odd jobs and act as nail clippers. The toothpick and tweezers are invaluable as well.

On a trip in a more remote locale where I thought I might need to rely on my knife to do heavy lifting (so to speak) then I'd carry my Helle Temagami or one of several I've forged myself.

I also really like Gerber for their quality to price ratio and often carry a mini paraframe fine edge. I hate serrated edges.

Meriadoc
02-04-2014, 21:35
Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade

Hey if I survive a fall from a cliff I will be able to make a ladder to get back up:banana

You just earned yourself a fan for your 2014 Nobo :D.

(Plus, those are only 4 ounces and good for batoning too.)

bamboo bob
02-04-2014, 21:38
The only thing you NEED a knife for is cutting off a piece of cheese. I found the edge of my spoon works fine for that. There's a long list of things you MIGHT want a knife for. If you're that type who worries about what might happen a very small cutting edge will do the job.

Wise Old Owl
02-04-2014, 21:51
The only thing you NEED a knife for is cutting off a piece of cheese. I found the edge of my spoon works fine for that. There's a long list of things you MIGHT want a knife for. If you're that type who worries about what might happen a very small cutting edge will do the job.

Perhaps its the Boy Scout in me. Yes there are tons of obvious blazes, Yes there are designated camps spots as well as better spots you cannot set up in. BB people disappear on a disturbing scale in State and National Parks... Young and old alike. A few skills on how to make a fuzz stick, build a fire in a emergency, clean a fish, etc. I am not talking survival, just getting yourself out of a stupid situation. This whole notion that a razor blade or a Swiss will work.. has issues... ask Aron Ralston, he had a crappy Chinese knife too.

If you find yourself in a bad situation its too late for feel good hope... the first step it to get yourself out of it, long before you call for help. - that's called action.

Kc Fiedler
02-04-2014, 22:10
Perhaps its the Boy Scout in me. Yes there are tons of obvious blazes, Yes there are designated camps spots as well as better spots you cannot set up in. BB people disappear on a disturbing scale in State and National Parks... Young and old alike. A few skills on how to make a fuzz stick, build a fire in a emergency, clean a fish, etc. I am not talking survival, just getting yourself out of a stupid situation. This whole notion that a razor blade or a Swiss will work.. has issues... ask Aron Ralston, he had a crappy Chinese knife too.

If you find yourself in a bad situation its too late for feel good hope... the first step it to get yourself out of it, long before you call for help. - that's called action.

Aaron Ralston was trapped by a multiple hundred pound sandstone chock stone. Unless he'd been carrying a broadsword I don't think blades were about to help him get out of there. Though I'm sure he didn't appreciate the dull blade from banging it on the chock stone when he was cutting off his arm.

I'm with you on the action part of solving a backcountry problem. I'm confident enough in my skills, though, to not feel the need for anything larger than a victorinox on the AT.

A good knife sure does go a long way in the hands of a skilled woodsman though. I can respect your boyscout urge.

kayak karl
02-04-2014, 22:18
It's one of the ways you can tell a hiker from a car camper. or from a skilled woodsman :rolleyes:

MuddyWaters
02-04-2014, 22:21
I've heard conflicting information about open carrying a blade. The most reliable information I've gotten on the subject is from a very close friend in law enforcement back in MI. He assured me that it is perfectly legal to open carry any length of blade, technically speaking you could walk down Main Street carrying a Katana. Could you still get cited for disturbing the peace or something similar? Probably.

Exceptions include double edged blades, butterfly knives, brass knuckles, and fully spring actuated blades.


I carry a victorinox classic on the AT. Very light, never need a knife any bigger, the scissors help with various odd jobs and act as nail clippers. The toothpick and tweezers are invaluable as well.

On a trip in a more remote locale where I thought I might need to rely on my knife to do heavy lifting (so to speak) then I'd carry my Helle Temagami or one of several I've forged myself.

I also really like Gerber for their quality to price ratio and often carry a mini paraframe fine edge. I hate serrated edges.

Suggest you reads the state laws in places like Ga, NH, MA, etc. They are very clear. Last time I checked the AT didnt go thru MI.


For instance, in GA:
The simple version of Georgia knife laws can be summed up in one sentence: you can carry any blade you want, any way you want, any place in the state so long as it’s not over five inches in length. You can carry bigger blades with a concealed weapon permit,


and NJ: heres a summary:

New Jersey Criminal Code section 2C:39-5(d) (http://lis.njleg.state.nj.us/cgi-bin/om_isapi.dll?clientID=73630945&Depth=2&TD=WRAP&advquery=knive&depth=4&expandheadings=on&headingswithhits=on&hitsperheading=on&infobase=statutes.nfo&rank=&record=%7B1A57%7D&softpage=Doc_Frame_PG42&wordsaroundhits=2&x=0&y=0&zz=)

Any person who knowingly has in his possession any other weapon under circumstances not manifestly appropriate for such lawful uses as it may have is guilty of a crime of the fourth degree.
As a lawyer I don’t understand how a statute like this hasn’t been struck down as unconstitutionally vague. There are published accounts (http://exa.gmnews.com/news/2010-12-09/Greg_Bean%27s_Column/Heres_your_Boy_Scout_knife_and_here_are_the_handcu .html) of citizens being arrested for no other reason than having an ordinary pocketknife in their possession. With a law this broad, even a Leatherman tool or Victorinox might not have a ‘manifestly appropriate use’ under the circumstances of the moment when the cops start asking questions.
I didn’t even bother looking up whether New Jersey state law preempts local law, because it’s nearly impossible to get any worse than NJ state law anyway.
Conclusion: Everything is illegal there.

Kc Fiedler
02-04-2014, 22:22
Suggest you reads the state laws in places like Ga, NH, MA, etc

I'm not planning on carrying anything that might be questionable in the first place. But if or when I do, I'll be sure to check with local authorities.

Sarcasm the elf
02-04-2014, 22:38
I'm curious to know how many people carry some form of sheath knife with them on an AT thru, or any extended hike on the AT? If you do, what size, type, and where do you carry it?

I only carry my Leatherman Micra when I backpack. If I did bring a sheath knife it would be my Mora Knife.

Like others have said, carrying a sheath knife is legally questionable in several of the states that the trail goes through, particularly in the Northeast.

aficion
02-04-2014, 22:52
I didnít even bother looking up whether New Jersey state law preempts local law, because itís nearly impossible to get any worse than NJ state law anyway.
Conclusion: Everything is illegal there.[/QUOTE]

It is apparently legal to block traffic if you like.

Weather-man
02-04-2014, 22:59
I'm curious to know how many people carry some form of sheath knife with them on an AT thru, or any extended hike on the AT? If you do, what size, type, and where do you carry it?

Interestingly enough all of my gear is very light weight to ultra light but I carry a Mora on my belt. The one I use in 3 oz with sheath and has a 4" working blade and full handle. Will I need or use this knife everyday? No, probably not but my feeling is that a knife is a (if not "the"...) basic survival tool and I'm ok with carrying those 3 oz. I carry virtually no other nice to have or "just in case" items but for some reason carrying a decent working knife just seems to make sense.

aficion
02-04-2014, 23:04
Interestingly enough all of my gear is very light weight to ultra light but I carry a Mora on my belt. The one I use in 3 oz with sheath and has a 4" working blade and full handle. Will I need or use this knife everyday? No, probably not but my feeling is that a knife is a (if not "the"...) basic survival tool and I'm ok with carrying those 3 oz. I carry virtually no other nice to have or "just in case" items but for some reason carrying a decent working knife just seems to make sense.

It makes perfectly good sense, that is what they are for. Many here will point out that you can thru hike successfully without one. I could thru hike without most everything I carry and so could many more. So what?

Conure
02-05-2014, 08:22
Thanks all!

The reason I was asking is because I've carried some form of full tang, sheathed knife since I was a Boy Scout and have ever since, and I just can't wrap my head around the thought of not having one on the AT, regardless of any weight factor.

I was taught to always carry a knife on your belt, for these two reasons: 1) if you lose all your gear (pack or whatnot) you still have your knife, and 2) if you need it for any sort of defensive action, it must be readily available.

I was simply wondering how many other folks do the same.

Conure
02-05-2014, 08:27
It makes perfectly good sense, that is what they are for. Many here will point out that you can thru hike successfully without one. I could thru hike without most everything I carry and so could many more. So what?

This is my thought exactly. Will I need my knife to survive on the AT...its possible, but extremely unlikely. Will I wish I had my knife if I leave it at home...it would probably interfere with my mindset, yes. Will I look completely ridiculous cutting cheese with a 3 1/2 inch bush knife...yeah, probably to some, but who cares : )

bfayer
02-05-2014, 09:05
EZEE Izula.

I would not carry one on a thru hike, but this one is by far the best knife mentioned in this thread. Anything ESEE makes is 100% reliable. There are very few companies that will get that endorsement from me.

Corsac
02-05-2014, 09:23
Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade

Hey if I survive a fall from a cliff I will be able to make a ladder to get back up:banana

X2, great knife!

pawlinghiker
02-05-2014, 09:32
It's one of the ways you can tell a hiker from a car camper.

another stupid comment. people besides car campers carry knives. get a grip , your not that cool buddy

Conure
02-05-2014, 09:51
I would not carry one on a thru hike, but this one is by far the best knife mentioned in this thread. Anything ESEE makes is 100% reliable. There are very few companies that will get that endorsement from me.

This knife looks exactly like the type of knife a cop would describe as a weapon. Just sayin'.

http://www.eseeizula.com/

tarditi
02-05-2014, 09:57
ESEE Izula. Outstanding knife - small enough to be unobtrusive, tough enough to handle anything you're likely to need.
Unconditional guarantee. http://www.eseeknives.com/izula.htm

bfayer
02-05-2014, 10:08
This knife looks exactly like the type of knife a cop would describe as a weapon. Just sayin'.

http://www.eseeizula.com/

The police can consider any knife a weapon if they want to. I can say from my years in federal law enforcement, unless it is specifically illegal like a auto knife, it's not the knife LEOs care about, it's the behavior of the person, the knife is just used as the excuse to investigate further. I would say 90+% of the people I dealt with doing LE were carrying some type of knife.

The Izula has a blade of less than 3 inches, and is available in bright orange (the one I have). It is much less weapon like than most other fixed blade knifes people walk around in the woods with.

Having said all that, I see no reason to carry one on a thru hike. A small pocket knife is all you need on the AT.

One more thing I should add about this subject: It is a violation of federal law to take a knife with a blade of greater than 2.5 inches into a federal facility. Federal facilities include just about every building in a National Park. This is not a law the park service normally enforces, but they can if they want to. Make your choices accordingly.

Conure
02-05-2014, 10:29
...it's not the knife LEOs care about, it's the behavior of the person, the knife is just used as the excuse to investigate further.

Good to know. Thanks!

perdidochas
02-05-2014, 10:53
Perhaps its the Boy Scout in me. Yes there are tons of obvious blazes, Yes there are designated camps spots as well as better spots you cannot set up in. BB people disappear on a disturbing scale in State and National Parks... Young and old alike. A few skills on how to make a fuzz stick, build a fire in a emergency, clean a fish, etc. I am not talking survival, just getting yourself out of a stupid situation. This whole notion that a razor blade or a Swiss will work.. has issues... ask Aron Ralston, he had a crappy Chinese knife too.

If you find yourself in a bad situation its too late for feel good hope... the first step it to get yourself out of it, long before you call for help. - that's called action.

Ironically, the Boy Scouts is now discouraging the use of sheath knives. Our local council has an outright ban on them (not enforced, but said aloud to Scouts).

Tuckahoe
02-05-2014, 10:55
Ironically, the Boy Scouts is now discouraging the use of sheath knives. Our local council has an outright ban on them (not enforced, but said aloud to Scouts).

Hasnt that always been the case? I can remember back to Scouts in the early to mid-80s that we were only allowed to have pocket knives.

Old Grouse
02-05-2014, 10:56
Suggest you reads the state laws in places like Ga, NH, MA, etc. They are very clear. Last time I checked the AT didnt go thru MI.


For instance, in GA:
The simple version of Georgia knife laws can be summed up in one sentence: you can carry any blade you want, any way you want, any place in the state so long as itís not over five inches in length. You can carry bigger blades with a concealed weapon permit,


and NJ: heres a summary:

New Jersey Criminal Code section 2C:39-5(d) (http://lis.njleg.state.nj.us/cgi-bin/om_isapi.dll?clientID=73630945&Depth=2&TD=WRAP&advquery=knive&depth=4&expandheadings=on&headingswithhits=on&hitsperheading=on&infobase=statutes.nfo&rank=&record=%7B1A57%7D&softpage=Doc_Frame_PG42&wordsaroundhits=2&x=0&y=0&zz=)
Any person who knowingly has in his possession any other weapon under circumstances not manifestly appropriate for such lawful uses as it may have is guilty of a crime of the fourth degree.

As a lawyer I donít understand how a statute like this hasnít been struck down as unconstitutionally vague. There are published accounts (http://exa.gmnews.com/news/2010-12-09/Greg_Bean%27s_Column/Heres_your_Boy_Scout_knife_and_here_are_the_handcu .html) of citizens being arrested for no other reason than having an ordinary pocketknife in their possession. With a law this broad, even a Leatherman tool or Victorinox might not have a Ďmanifestly appropriate useí under the circumstances of the moment when the cops start asking questions.
I didnít even bother looking up whether New Jersey state law preempts local law, because itís nearly impossible to get any worse than NJ state law anyway.
Conclusion: Everything is illegal there.


To quote that eminent jurist Bob Dylan, "In Jersey everything's legal, as long as you don't get caught."

SunnyWalker
02-05-2014, 11:14
Conure: I carry a Buck Hartsook neck knife. Look it up at buckknives.com You'll never notice it, its always there when you need it and handy too, also it is VERY sharp and more knife then you'll need on the AT, PCT and PCT and etc. I leave for the CDT this April 2014 and will be taking this knife again with me.

Here is a link to view the Hartsook:http://buckknives.com/index.cfm?event=products.search&SearchTerms=hartsook+&x=20&y=8

Another good neck knife is the Becker Necker neck knife. It is heavier though. I have worn it and it takes some getting use to. OTOH the Hartsook is so light I tend to forget I have it around my neck.

perdidochas
02-05-2014, 11:20
Hasnt that always been the case? I can remember back to Scouts in the early to mid-80s that we were only allowed to have pocket knives.

In the late 1970s, it was almost a requirement to have a sheath knife and a pocket knife :-)

Conure
02-05-2014, 11:30
To quote that eminent jurist Bob Dylan, "In Jersey everything's legal, as long as you don't get caught."

Depends on who catches you...sometimes they just want in : )

bfayer
02-05-2014, 11:32
In the late 1970s, it was almost a requirement to have a sheath knife and a pocket knife :-)

I was a scout in the 70s and we were not allowed to have fixed blade knifes in our troop. I am an ASM now and our troop does not allow fixed blades. BSA however does not prohibit them, it is up to the local council, district, or troop to decide what is best for their scouts.

Conure
02-05-2014, 11:32
Ironically, the Boy Scouts is now discouraging the use of sheath knives. Our local council has an outright ban on them (not enforced, but said aloud to Scouts).

As far as I know, they have revised a lot of things since I was a Scout...including hunting, trapping and animal processing. It's not the same Scouts I belonged to anymore. To also quote the eminent Bobby, "the times, they are a changin'."

Kc Fiedler
02-05-2014, 11:47
I was taught to always carry a knife on your belt, for these two reasons: 1) if you lose all your gear (pack or whatnot) you still have your knife, and 2) if you need it for any sort of defensive action, it must be readily available.

How do you wear a belt with a knife on it and still wear the hip belt of your backpack properly? Just curious because I can't stand having a belt let alone a knife under my hip pads.

Trance
02-05-2014, 11:51
http://www.amazon.com/Smith-Wesson-SWHRT9B-Black-Knife/dp/B000IXG44U/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1391615328&sr=8-1&keywords=smith+and+wesson+dagger

Smith and Wesson Boot knife. Lightweight, if you sharpen it alittle it cuts great. Looks like something you wouldnt want to get stuck with either, so it keeps the trail hobos at bay. I dont need a multitool with a screwdriver to hike the AT.

Second Hand
02-05-2014, 11:53
I come from the same school of thought as a lot of people on this thread. When I first started out I carried a Full tango knife w/ 550 cord handle and flint fire starter tied to it. I envisioned myself being stranded in the woods and needing to build shelters and make fires night after night.

I then switched down to a Swiss army knife that I carry with me everywhere I go.

I soon realized I didn't need screw drivers and other odds and ends on the trail, so I downsized to a smaller swiss army knife.

I prefer this over a fixed blade knife because I find the Scissors and tweezers to be the most useful on the trail.

bfayer
02-05-2014, 12:10
http://www.amazon.com/Smith-Wesson-SWHRT9B-Black-Knife/dp/B000IXG44U/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1391615328&sr=8-1&keywords=smith+and+wesson+dagger

Smith and Wesson Boot knife. Lightweight, if you sharpen it alittle it cuts great. Looks like something you wouldnt want to get stuck with either, so it keeps the trail hobos at bay. I dont need a multitool with a screwdriver to hike the AT.

Concealing double edged knifes in VA is illegal. The knife itself is not illegal, but if you have it it better be in plain sight.

ß 18.2-308. Personal protection; carrying concealed weapons; when lawful to carry. A. If any person carries about his person, hidden from common observation, . . . (ii) any dirk, bowie knife, switchblade knife, ballistic knife, machete, razor, . . . or (v) any weapon of like kind as those enumerated in this subsection, he shall be guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor

The VA courts define "Dirk" as a double edged knife.

Conure
02-05-2014, 12:38
How do you wear a belt with a knife on it and still wear the hip belt of your backpack properly? Just curious because I can't stand having a belt let alone a knife under my hip pads.

I understand what you're asking but I don't know how to answer you. It doesn't, nor has it ever, been a problem for me. In the Scouts I wore a standard, canvas type belt (normal Scout wear). Afterward, when I started becoming more "fashionable" I started wearing 1 1/2 leather belts. That's all I ever wear anymore. Either belt has never given me any kind of issue with wearing a backpack and interfering with its padded hip belt.

Maybe its just me : )

One thing I will say though, like a knife, I don't go into the woods without a belt. If situations demand, I can use my belt for a tourniquet, safety line, burnish my knife blade, etc. Hell, in a survival situation I could even cut it into strips if need be. Thousand and one uses for a good leather belt.

I feel I need to make it clear that I am neither paranoid nor naive. What I was looking for in this post was a general idea of what types of non-folding knives people that bring them use, and where they carry it. I have every intention of carrying my knife, even though I am acutely aware that it is overkill for the AT, and I highly doubt it will ever leave its sheath. Still, for me, in my mind, not having my knife is like not having a life jacket on when in a boat. I much rather have it and never use it then not have it in that single, rare instance when it could save your life. Its how I've been taught.

I can tell you that I have been thankful to have a knife many times in the past but I've never needed one to survive, yet; except to get a particular solo survival merit badge way back when I was in the Scouts...hmmm, wonder if that's one they revised too : )

Kc Fiedler
02-05-2014, 12:39
Does the knife it's self ride below the pad of the belt when you carry it?

Conure
02-05-2014, 13:31
Does the knife it's self ride below the pad of the belt when you carry it?

Okay, I'm working from home so I was able to do some research...

I have an Osprey Atmos 65 that I am modifying for my AT hike, I just purchased this pack two weeks ago. I also have an old but still used external frame Jansport pack that I have had since I was seventeen and has been everywhere with me. I've just tested both packs wearing two different sheath knives (a six inch hunting knife and a 4 1/2 inch bush knife). I also tested wearing the knives on either side of my body...but then I realized what's going on.

First, the logistics and answer to your question:

The hip belt of both packs basically cover my belt, more or less. The knife's handle falls below both belts, allowing access to the knife without interference. Doesn't matter which side its on (just for the sake of conversation I will state that I primarily wear my knife on the side opposite my dominant hand--for me, that's my left side).

Now, the realization:

The knife sheaths I use, one I made and the other was a custom purchase, are of the style that has the belt loop reaching up and over the knife handle, almost like a separate part of the sheath itself, not the type that has the belt loop sewn behind the knife handle. This drops the knife down about 2 1/2 inches from the belt. To validate, I dug out one my knives' old sheaths--sheez, the things you do for WB : )--and, sure enough, it had the belt loop sewn behind the knife's handle; and, sure enough, it interfered with the hip belt. So there you have it, not much of a mystery after all.

Quick answer, yes the knife rides below the hip belt but only due to a certain style of sheath.

Kc Fiedler
02-05-2014, 13:32
Okay, I'm working from home so I was able to do some research...

I have an Osprey Atmos 65 that I am modifying for my AT hike, I just purchased this pack two weeks ago. I also have an old but still used external frame Jansport pack that I have had since I was seventeen and has been everywhere with me. I've just tested both packs wearing two different sheath knives (a six inch hunting knife and a 4 1/2 inch bush knife). I also tested wearing the knives on either side of my body...but then I realized what's going on.

First, the logistics and answer to your question:

The hip belt of both packs basically cover my belt, more or less. The knife's handle falls below both belts, allowing access to the knife without interference. Doesn't matter which side its on (just for the sake of conversation I will state that I primarily wear my knife on the side opposite my dominant hand--for me, that's my left side).

Now, the realization:

The knife sheaths I use, one I made and the other was a custom purchase, are of the style that has the belt loop reaching up and over the knife handle, almost like a separate part of the sheath itself, not the type that has the belt loop sewn behind the knife handle. This drops the knife down about 2 1/2 inches from the belt. To validate, I dug out one my knives' old sheaths--sheez, the things you do for WB : )--and, sure enough, it had the belt loop sewn behind the knife's handle; and, sure enough, it interfered with the hip belt. So there you have it, not much of a mystery after all.

Quick answer, yes the knife rides below the hip belt but only due to a certain style of sheath.

Mystery solved!

Conure
02-05-2014, 13:39
Mystery solved!

Yes. And I can definitely appreciate your apprehension of "how the hell is that possible!"

squeezebox
02-05-2014, 13:46
Would I have to get one of those idiot Sylvester Stylone hair cuts before I bought the knife. let alone his time in porn movies.

Glogg
02-05-2014, 14:24
I carried a non-folding knife on the AT in 2012. It was a Victorinox 3.5" paring knife. For a sheath, I used the plastic sleeve it came in, the bottom end reinforced with duct tape. For storage, it lived in the mesh front pocket of my ULA Circuit. I used it for cutting cheese, slicing sausage, and carving a pair of chopsticks once when I left my spoon in a hostel. :)

Toon
02-05-2014, 17:00
I always use neck knives while hiking. A knife is worthless if u gotta dig it out of your pack in a hurry. I recommend this
http://www.knifecenter.com/item/CR2380/Columbia-River-Ritter-RSK-Mk5-Neck-Knife-175-inch-Plain-Blade-for-Survival-Kit

Sent from my SPH-M820-BST using Tapatalk 2

Toon
02-05-2014, 17:01
I always use neck knives while hiking. A knife is worthless if u gotta dig it out of your pack in a hurry. I recommend this
http://www.knifecenter.com/item/CR2380/Columbia-River-Ritter-RSK-Mk5-Neck-Knife-175-inch-Plain-Blade-for-Survival-Kit

Sent from my SPH-M820-BST using Tapatalk 2

Plus it only weights. .9 oz hard to beat that.

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Kc Fiedler
02-05-2014, 19:57
I've seen a couple people mention having to get to a knife quickly. What situations have you found yourself in that require instant access to your knives?

aficion
02-05-2014, 21:09
I've seen a couple people mention having to get to a knife quickly. What situations have you found yourself in that require instant access to your knives?

You fall in a lake and get entangled in someones trot line.

Kc Fiedler
02-05-2014, 21:14
You fall in a lake and get entangled in someones trot line.

Hate it when that happens.

aficion
02-05-2014, 21:24
Hate it when that happens.

OK it hasn't happened yet but I am capable. What about if you wake up to find the creepy girl you bought drinks for has bound your feet with para cord and is in the process of hitching you to her pack mule?

WILLIAM HAYES
02-05-2014, 21:25
a swiss army knife I have seen everthing on the trail from machetes to axes

Kc Fiedler
02-05-2014, 21:28
OK it hasn't happened yet but I am capable. What about if you wake up to find the creepy girl you bought drinks for has bound your feet with para cord and is in the process of hitching you to her pack mule?

Hahaha way to bring in that other thread. That was pretty funny I gotta give you kudos.

SunnyWalker
02-06-2014, 10:03
Toon: Pretty nice neck knife. A little more "sportier" then the Buck Hartsook. Shorter blade though . . . maybe. Hartsook is pretty small and short itself. Weight on it is also .9 oz., like the knife you left as an example.

bfayer
02-06-2014, 10:13
OK it hasn't happened yet but I am capable. What about if you wake up to find the creepy girl you bought drinks for has bound your feet with para cord and is in the process of hitching you to her pack mule?

Then she already has your knife and your screwed.

kayak karl
02-06-2014, 10:29
You fall in a lake and get entangled in someones trot line.
my knife (http://www.opticsplanet.com/crkt-bear-claw-knife-fixed-blade.html?gclid=CIHdxOPat7wCFa1lOgodr34Agw&ef_id=Iu1P-CN4E1sAAE4W:20140206142731:s) is on my vest. only had to use it once to cut myself out of tangled paddle lease playing in the waves.

Toon
02-06-2014, 16:22
You fall in a lake and get entangled in someones trot line.

I have had to cut myself out of a bush hook underwater while diving.

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Night Train
02-06-2014, 16:44
OK it hasn't happened yet but I am capable. What about if you wake up to find the creepy girl you bought drinks for has bound your feet with para cord and is in the process of hitching you to her pack mule?
Was she creepy before or after you bought drinks for her?

Drybones
02-06-2014, 17:09
OK it hasn't happened yet but I am capable. What about if you wake up to find the creepy girl you bought drinks for has bound your feet with para cord and is in the process of hitching you to her pack mule?

Dont worry until she hauls you home to meet dad and bro...and you hear banjo music playing on the porch.

aficion
02-06-2014, 17:39
I have had to cut myself out of a bush hook underwater while diving.

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My scuba knife, carried on my lower leg, was only used to shuck oysters and clams, yet I was always glad it was there. Unlike some girlfriends.:D

TheYoungOne
02-07-2014, 13:01
My go to fixed blade knife for AT hiking is a Light My Fire Mora knife. Its a 3.75" blade, 3.4oz and looks very non-threatening. Basically a glorified kitchen paring knife with a fire steel attached to the handle. That fire steel I hope makes it "dual use" and in places like NJ where like mentioned earlier everything is pretty much illegal at least as a hiker on the AT you can argue the whole "explainable lawful purpose" and "weapon under circumstances not manifestly appropriate for such lawful uses" pat of their law.

I usually keep it with my cook set on the side pocket, next to my spork, so it hidden in plain sight but not a concealed weapon and looks like just another utensil. Its useful for food prep, whittling, digging out splinters, and God Forbid for last ditch Self defense.

okiefree
02-09-2014, 18:06
I guess if you only hike the AT you don't need a knife, but I don't personally understand why anyone would put themselves in a potential survival situation without a decent knife. A solid knife with a tang is 2 to 4 ounces. Mora knives are excellent.

bfayer
02-09-2014, 18:45
I guess if you only hike the AT you don't need a knife, but I don't personally understand why anyone would put themselves in a potential survival situation without a decent knife. A solid knife with a tang is 2 to 4 ounces. Mora knives are excellent.

Maybe it's an experience thing. None of the most experienced high mileage hikers that I have either talked to or read about carry anything more than a pocket knife. Andrew Skurka for example just packs a little Victorinox Classic swiss army knife. And he has been places most of us will never go.

Meriadoc
02-09-2014, 20:31
Maybe it's an experience thing. None of the most experienced high mileage hikers that I have either talked to or read about carry anything more than a pocket knife. Andrew Skurka for example just packs a little Victorinox Classic swiss army knife. And he has been places most of us will never go.

Two thoughts here:
(1) A survival situation is pretty darn rare. Things have to go badly wrong.
The more time one spends in the back country the more chances there are for something to go badly wrong. But:
(2) Can you folks think of a situation where things go badly wrong on the scenic trails without any bad decisions coming into play? (This is only a semi-rhetorical question. As someone who has led back country hikes and this summer will be leading 2-3 day back country trips, I am interested in answers.)
My point here is that good decisions prevent things from going badly wrong. And my hunch is that those who have a large amount of experience tend to make few bad decisions.

Still, I will never fault someone for being prepared. And it may well be someone else's bad decision that you end up trying to help rectify.

Sarcasm the elf
02-09-2014, 21:01
I guess if you only hike the AT you don't need a knife, but I don't personally understand why anyone would put themselves in a potential survival situation without a decent knife. A solid knife with a tang is 2 to 4 ounces. Mora knives are excellent.

I think you already hit the nail on the head with your comment above. This site is focused on hiking the Appalachian Trail primarily and it attracts the Lightweight High Mileage crowd. Surprisingly few folks (in my opinion) on this site show much interest in bushcraft or other skills that are required to be considered a woodsman. I love the A.T. but it is admittedly a sort of wilderness trail with training wheels. For the most part it is safe to say that if you get hurt on the A.T. someone will probably pass by and find you and that search and rescue will most likely be able to get you to safety. All of this is a very good thing because it allows thousands of people to get out into the woods each year that otherwise might not get the chance, but it is very different from being a skilled outdoorsman.

Last October I had the chance to spend a week on the trail with a friend who is of the bushcraft/survivalist way of thinking and it amazed me how much he knew about the land that I didn't. He could reliably point out the locations of unmarked water sources, constantly identified edible and medicinal plants as we passed them, could start a fire in ways that I know about but can rarely do sucessfully and even spotted the soldiers that were trying to remain unseen in the area of Hawk Mountain shelter. Meanwhile I was lighter, faster and more efficient when it came to hiking, I knew how to pace myself and how to gauge realistic distances we could make on the trail each day. We both learned a lot from eachother during the trip.

And for the record he carried his mora knife and used it every day.

bfayer
02-09-2014, 21:22
I think you already hit the nail on the head with your comment above. This site is focused on hiking the Appalachian Trail primarily and it attracts the Lightweight High Mileage crowd. Surprisingly few folks (in my opinion) on this site show much interest in bushcraft or other skills that are required to be considered a woodsman. I love the A.T. but it is admittedly a sort of wilderness trail with training wheels. For the most part it is safe to say that if you get hurt on the A.T. someone will probably pass by and find you and that search and rescue will most likely be able to get you to safety. All of this is a very good thing because it allows thousands of people to get out into the woods each year that otherwise might not get the chance, but it is very different from being a skilled outdoorsman.

Last October I had the chance to spend a week on the trail with a friend who is of the bushcraft/survivalist way of thinking and it amazed me how much he knew about the land that I didn't. He could reliably point out the locations of unmarked water sources, constantly identified edible and medicinal plants as we passed them, could start a fire in ways that I know about but can rarely do sucessfully and even spotted the soldiers that were trying to remain unseen in the area of Hawk Mountain shelter. Meanwhile I was lighter, faster and more efficient when it came to hiking, I knew how to pace myself and how to gauge realistic distances we could make on the trail each day. We both learned a lot from eachother during the trip.

And for the record he carried his mora knife and used it every day.

As you pointed out, hiking and bushcraft are two separate skill sets, with two separate objectives. Also I don't think it's an just AT hiking thing either. I have been hiking in MI, CA, AZ, AK FL and a few other places to boot and you just don't see a lot of experienced hikers carrying much more than a pocket knife. As a matter of fact there was a time when my friends and I would joke saying you could tell a hikers experience level by the size of their knife.

Don't get me wrong, there is much value in a quality knife. But it doesn't have to be big or a have a fixed blade.

swjohnsey
02-09-2014, 21:43
You need something like a Kabar in case you are attacked by a grizzly bear.

TheYoungOne
02-10-2014, 13:10
You need something like a Kabar in case you are attacked by a grizzly bear.

LOL Supposedly that is where the name Ka-bar comes from, a hillbilly Fur trapper who wrote a letter to the company in the 1920's saying that he "kill a Bear" with the knife. Actually Kabar makes not only big military knives, but hunting knives, and camping knives. The BK-11 and BK-14 are great small fixed blade knives. Shug Emery over at Hammock forums can be seen sometimes carrying a Mora or a BK-11 on his shoulder straps of his pack.

okiefree
02-10-2014, 13:30
As you pointed out, hiking and bushcraft are two separate skill sets, with two separate objectives. Also I don't think it's an just AT hiking thing either. I have been hiking in MI, CA, AZ, AK FL and a few other places to boot and you just don't see a lot of experienced hikers carrying much more than a pocket knife. As a matter of fact there was a time when my friends and I would joke saying you could tell a hikers experience level by the size of their knife.

Don't get me wrong, there is much value in a quality knife. But it doesn't have to be big or a have a fixed blade.

That's pretty much the difference, some are not just hiking/traveling. We are taking the time to enjoy living in nature often diverting off main trails for several days. My knife is used every day, from cutting cord, as a digging tool, as a prying tool, cleaning game/fish, food preparation, making a pole spear, carving a design into a walking stick, as an ice pick, to help climb a tree, to climb a cliff, making small traps, as a backup fire striking tool, for dinner, for hammering tent spikes, for cutting ripstop, for freeing self of entanglement, as a rescue tool, as a can opener, for a making a spoon, as throwing knife for fun, combatting feral pig or other animal or person, and for river diving for gold nuggets and chipping them out!

The people who don't carry knives, I believe them when they say they don't need them, I just just approach hiking as a much different activity than they do, and I would probably find them boring as a travel companion.

RCBear
02-13-2014, 15:20
it would be either my Becker BK14 neck knife or my Mora Companion.

icemanat95
02-13-2014, 16:06
I tend to keep a small swiss army knife with scissors and a can opener in my first aid kit, and a small knife like an ESEE -3 or a Becker Necker hanging around my neck inside my shirt when hiking.

I have had a knife of some sort on my person pretty much every day (aside from Army Basic Training, Infantry School and Airborne School) since I was about ten. I feel naked without a knife clipped into my pocket or somewhere accessible on my body. Unlike most folks out there, I tend to run into a need for my knife almost daily, whether it be something mundane like opening a package, or something a bit more sporting like cutting my way out of a greenbriar, grapevine, multiflora rose, bittersweet, or other nasty thicket. People have made fun of the fact that I always carry a knife and keep it razor sharp....right up until they need to borrow it.

But you don't need a lot of knife on the AT or on most hiking trails. A little bushknife, Mora, ESEE-3, Becker Necker, etc. is ample for a fixed blade, and a decent Swiss Army type knife is an excellent choice for a folder.

My everyday carry knife is a Benchmade Osborne Rift. It is an Axis lock folder. Very robust folder. I'd leave it home on a hiking trip.

As an aside. The legality of virtually any knife will vary state to state and location to location. Most school property, for instance, is zero tolerance ground for any knife not owned by the school for use in a workshop or kitchen. By contrast, in some states, a private citizen can own and carry an automatic knife (switchblade), without any special licensing. There is a movement to get rid of anti-switchblade laws completely as a relic of the 1950's fear of streetgang thugs wielding switchblades. All that said, even if you are legal to carry one in your home state, simply carrying it across a state border is a violation of federal law.

oruacat2
02-13-2014, 18:16
This knife looks exactly like the type of knife a cop would describe as a weapon. Just sayin'.

http://www.eseeizula.com/

A stupid cop, maybe.

Old Curmudgeon
02-13-2014, 19:30
I almost always carry an ESEE Izula II. I certainly could get by without it but I never hike without a fixed blade knife. Just sleep better knowing I have it.

msupple
02-13-2014, 20:24
I carry a BK 14 mainly because I use a Bushbuddy wood stove and often find myself processing wood. I also have a Mora Bushcraft Black but usually carry the BK14 because it is smaller.

Cat in the Hat

Wise Old Owl
02-13-2014, 22:28
Aaron Ralston was trapped by a multiple hundred pound sandstone chock stone. Unless he'd been carrying a broadsword I don't think blades were about to help him get out of there. Though I'm sure he didn't appreciate the dull blade from banging it on the chock stone when he was cutting off his arm.

I suggest you check this page out it has two pictures. the first is a selfie and the other is the dull Chinese Leather-man Knock-off.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/8233734/Aron-Ralstons-127-Hours-This-is-going-to-make-one-hell-of-a-story.-.-..html


Ironically, the Boy Scouts is now discouraging the use of sheath knives. Our local council has an outright ban on them (not enforced, but said aloud to Scouts).


As far as I know, they have revised a lot of things since I was a Scout...including hunting, trapping and animal processing. It's not the same Scouts I belonged to anymore. To also quote the eminent Bobby, "the times, they are a changin'."

I remember them doing that in 78-79...Yes there have been changes. The Sheath knife thing has been here a long time at camps...its not new, but there is a huge difference between a traditional boy run scout troop and a most of the troups out there.


Hey look guys - I don't care how big or small your knifes are - just make sure you carry a sharp one. The Kabar neck knife was a good suggestion in a previous post to answer the original question.

Kc Fiedler
02-13-2014, 22:30
I checked out the page. What, exactly were you suggesting I look at it for?

Sarcasm the elf
02-13-2014, 22:41
I checked out the page. What, exactly were you suggesting I look at it for?

I believe he was emphasizing the importance of carrying a high quality knife with a sharp edge. If I correctly understand, the only knife that Ralson had available was cheap and dull.

Kc Fiedler
02-13-2014, 22:42
Thanks for the clarification.

Busky2
02-14-2014, 00:35
Cold Steel's "Urban Pal" is a small sharp push dagger single edged neck knife that is super light.25938

bfayer
02-14-2014, 07:50
Cold Steel's "Urban Pal" is a small sharp push dagger single edged neck knife that is super light.

Just a friendly note. "Super light" doesn't mean anything on here. To some folks it means less than 10 grams, to others it can mean less than 10oz.



Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk

Turk6177
02-14-2014, 08:33
I carry the Victorinox classic, however, I may be switching to the Leatherman Squirt Ps4. It opens to a small pair of pliers with a wire/cord cutter. It has scissors, a 1 1/2" blade, file, bottle opener with two screw drivers, and a tiny key chain to tether it. At 1.9 ounces compared to 1.3 ounces for the Victorinox classic, I might start carrying that just for the mini set of needle nosed pliers. http://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/66681?feat=sr&term=leatherman%20squirt%20PS4 Sorry, I know your post was about a non folding knife, but it looks like it evolved into an "any knife" discussion.

Charlie Pickens
02-14-2014, 08:40
A Mora knife is lightweight and as mentioned above good for batoning. Something to consider for your fire starting at the shelters. The fact that anyone wants to carry an actual knife instead of a leatherman doesn't make them any less of a hiker. I don't recall Benton Mackaye's gear list including a Leatherman micro so some of you might want to check the "I can tell your not a real hiker because you carry a heavy knife with you" attitude. We're all in this because we're drawn to this historic trail and way of life. Not a one of us is any better than the other.

Hike your own Hike.

Turk6177
02-14-2014, 08:46
I actually have conflicting data. I think the victorinox classic is lighter than I said, at .8 ounces. I may just stick with that after all. They do have a cool one that also has a red LED light on it which might come in handy in a shelter. It is called the Swiss Lite or Signature Lite. The only problem is that it uses the space for the tweezers for the light.

Kc Fiedler
02-14-2014, 10:24
I actually have conflicting data. I think the victorinox classic is lighter than I said, at .8 ounces. I may just stick with that after all. They do have a cool one that also has a red LED light on it which might come in handy in a shelter. It is called the Swiss Lite or Signature Lite. The only problem is that it uses the space for the tweezers for the light.

My victorinox classic is .75 on my scale. Just to confirm your numbers.

icemanat95
02-14-2014, 11:24
One other point.

Have some means to sharpen your knife available to you. There are many tools out there for this purpose some may, or may not be appropriate for the knife you choose. Serrated edges are very difficult to truly sharpen without appropriate tools. There is a type of sharpener out there called the "dog bone" it's a good option, small and lightweight and it has corners that can get into serrations if necessary.

The reality is that all it takes to bring a knife from shaving sharp to effectively dull, is a bad stroke that carries through against a rock, hidden metal, etc. So knowing how to maintain that edge is a valuable skill.

nu2hike
02-14-2014, 13:16
I realize this thread is about fixed blade knives. I don't mean to highjack the thread but I see that others have interjected thoughts on knives in general!
If I carry a knife and I typically do, I want one that is functional! I carry a Kershaw Skyline. ( gift from a friend)
Is the blade on the Victorinox or Leatherman Squirt a good blade? Is it capable of being used for instance to cut a stick to replace a trekking pole in the event one should break? My tent requires two trekking poles to set up! If one of my poles should break I want to have the capability of replacing it! My knife isn't the lightest. I would be willing to go with something lighter but only if it would perform the task above.
To me the question isn't fixed blade or folder but overall functionality.

Mags
02-14-2014, 13:26
What are you trying to do? Backpack a well maintained and well marked trail less than five miles from a road? Skiing in the winter backcountry? Want to harvest wild plants and having a fire is part of the agenda? Am I hunting?

Take what is appropriate for the trip.

For my three-season backpacking, the SAK classic (with a P-51 can opener) is just fine (and, I've been in some reasonably remote places)

When skiing, I take a leatherman kick as I have had to repair in field and I would have SOL with a smaller knife.

If I was into bushcraft more, I'd probably take a bigger knife. But I'm not. So I don't. And while I do have a possible interest in hunting at some point (seriously), it is not something I currently do.

I am not worried about survival situations as even day hiking, I have warm clothing, food, water, and a lighter. Backpacking? Heck, I am carrying a shelter and a sleeping bag. I don't feel the need to play Robinson Crusoe and construct an elaborate shelter. Hell, 12 yo boyscouts can make a shelter w/o a knife: http://boyslife.org/outdoors/3473/taking-shelter/ Surely we can? :)

Ultimately it is not the tool you take, but what you know how to do.

Just Bill
02-14-2014, 16:12
I have everything from a Mike Clelland "sharp thing" which is too extreme for me, to full tang $500 Randall knives. Right tool right job- depends on the trip.

The absolute heaviest knife I would carry on a trail like the AT is the Mora/Light My Fire knife. At three ounces it is a concession if fire or emergency work was needed. Although I can baton wood with a SA classic or Leatherman Micra just fine as well and the scissors/file come in way more handy than a knife more often than not.

When I go on UL trips; I use a caldera cone and esbit as my primary cooking source, I take exactly the amount I need. I bring a stove as a balance against cold weather because I take a bare minimum sleep system and shelter, sometimes none. I push myself a bit and could easily get myself in a bad spot.

I carry a sleeping bag 4-16 ounces lighter than most, a tent 8-16 ounces lighter than many, leave home the extra 2-4 ounces of fuel. In saving those two pounds I take on risk- as a safety piece I add back in the three ounce Mora (technically 2.2 ounces more vs a classic) and a small pouch of vaseline soaked cotton balls at .5 ounce.

If something extreme happened instead of putting 2 or 3 pounds of gear in to take care of it, I add the knife confident I can build a shelter or start a fire easily because I have a full knife. I could figure it out with no knife, but coupled with the speed- it's not worth the weight penalty. Stupid light or stupid heavy are both stupid. Always be safe.

As Mags said- I also have a backpack.

WILLIAM HAYES
02-14-2014, 22:25
I dont recall seeing any thru hikers carrying a sheath knifes on the trail hunters and day campers seemed to be the only ones with some big ass knives

Wise Old Owl
02-14-2014, 22:34
I believe he was emphasizing the importance of carrying a high quality knife with a sharp edge. If I correctly understand, the only knife that Ralson had available was cheap and dull.

Nailed it - a good knife does not mean exspensive - just high quality as best you can afford, I am asking folks to look above Swiss as they are the fast food of introductory knives. Stainless goes dull to fast for anyone... Ralton cut his arm off with crap duller than Swiss.

Wise Old Owl
02-14-2014, 22:37
I carry the Victorinox classic, however, I may be switching to the Leatherman Squirt Ps4. It opens to a small pair of pliers with a wire/cord cutter. It has scissors, a 1 1/2" blade, file, bottle opener with two screw drivers, and a tiny key chain to tether it. At 1.9 ounces compared to 1.3 ounces for the Victorinox classic, I might start carrying that just for the mini set of needle nosed pliers. http://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/66681?feat=sr&term=leatherman%20squirt%20PS4 Sorry, I know your post was about a non folding knife, but it looks like it evolved into an "any knife" discussion.

I have it - its fine, better than swiss.

Mags
02-14-2014, 23:02
Ralton cut his arm off with crap duller than Swiss.

er..Ralston's main issue was not a knock-off SAK. Started when he took that first step down the canyon; perhaps even his drive from the Denver 'burbs. :)

.

DocMahns
02-15-2014, 00:58
I really like Mora's, cheap and super sharp. I have the Morakniv Robust;

25949
I really like it, stays sharp and so cheap you don't care if you lose it

icemanat95
02-15-2014, 15:08
er..Ralston's main issue was not a knock-off SAK. Started when he took that first step down the canyon; perhaps even his drive from the Denver 'burbs. :)

.

Dead on. Most of these things happen because people bite off more than they can chew, often deluding themselves that they are more capable than they actually are. Following the initial decision to take on more than they can manage, a chain of poor decisions takes place that gradually result in a completely unmanageable and/or unsurvivable situation. That Ralston was able to hack his own arm off to get free of that stone speaks to his will to survive rather than any objective skills or capabilities. A good knife would have made his self-rescue more comfortable and quicker, but would not have solved the basic problem of poor decision making.

Likewise, carrying a good knife, a bad knife or all the crap in the world, won't save your life if you lack the skills to figure out how to use them appropriately. A good knife is a good tool for adapting to bad situations and disasters, but only if you know how to use it.

Imagination goes a long damned way. What you can imagine, you can make real (within reasonable parameters) but you've got to figure out the steps between here and there.

I have seen some big knives out on the trail, even in the hands of thru-hikers. The largest was a Khukri knife. Most were bordering on utter uselessness within the context.

The Mora is an excellent option as an all around trail knife. It may be overkill for the relatively secure context of the AT, but as a survival tool, it offers a huge amount of utility for the weight. Consider that it has enough blade for bushcraft work, can manage skinning chores, filleting (with care), processing wood for fires and shelter or just to spread peanut butter across a bagel. It is also small enough however, for finer carving work, minor surface surgery, etc, and the sharp tip can manage some minor drilling work as well. This is the reason that the Mora is the primary bushcraft knife worldwide and the pattern most other bushcraft knives are based on.

It and knives like it are good choices.

Wise Old Owl
02-15-2014, 16:12
Yes I agree Mags... he didn't let anyone know where he was going... The only reason why I know about that knife is its in my sons kit in the past.

Tuckahoe
02-15-2014, 22:04
Had never really paid attention to the discussion of Mora knives or even knew about them so I had to look them up. Looks like at their prices I might just try one out.

http://www.ramblinjim.com/articles/mora-knife-models-explained-and-compared/

Just Bill
02-16-2014, 17:38
I like the Light My Fire/Mora partnership. Coupled with a 1/2 ounce worth of Vaseline coated cotton balls it's a pretty good package. They aren't bombproof but basic batoning or medium duty knifework (basic notching or chopping in a pinch) are covered for a light small package. Sheath is decent and I like the bright colors so when I set it down in the leaves next to me I can easily spot it again. And yes- price is right.

44terryberry
02-17-2014, 17:26
I like a lightweight tool that does double duty.The Cold Steel Recon Tanto is my go-to knife.After a lifetime with all types of blades,this is my choice.It is long enough to be a decent chopper,and small enough not to get in the way.