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kidben
02-14-2014, 02:54
Gear List (Revised V2)

Starting around March 17th.


PackOsprey Atmos 65
Sea to Summit Pack Cover



Shelter
Synthetic 20F Sleeping Bag
Small Inflatable Sleeping Pad
Compressible Pillow
Eureka, Solitaire 1 Person Tent



Clothes
2 pairs injinji sock liners
2 pairs darn tough Vermont socks (1 thick pair for sleeping, 1 regular pair for hiking)
New Balance trail runners
Flip Flops
ExOfficio briefs
Thermal bottoms
Zip off pants
2 polyester t shirts
Thermal top
polar fleece
synthetic jacket
rain jacket
winter cap
summer cap
balaclava
sugoi synthetic gloves
10L dry sack



Cooking Materials
Toaks 850ml Titanium Pot
Toaks Titanium Spork
Pocket Rocket stove
lighter
matches
1/4 sponge
10L dry sack
50ft chord (and small bag)

mini carabiner


Electronics
iPhone 5 (life proof case, ear bud headphones, and charging cord)
PowerGen Mobile 12000mAh External Battery Pack (PowerGen charging cord)
Black Diamond Equipment Storm Headlamp



Accessories
2014 Northbound The A.T. Guide Awol"
Micro Towel (sea to summit)
90 mL all purpose soap
90 mL hand sanitizer
tooth brush (and toothbrush cap)
mini toothpaste
nail clipper
1 pen ( and a few folded pieces of lined paper)
First Aid Kit (bandaids, moleskins, antiseptic wipes, antiboitic ointment,gauze,small medical tape roll)
Small spf 50 sunscreen
2L camel bak blatter
2, 1L Platypus
aquamira water treatment
Pace Maker trekking poles
vitorinox hiker
vitorinox swisscard
prescription sunglasses
prescription glasses





I'm thinking my list is getting pretty dialed. I don't have the weight because I'm waiting for my tent, pot, and socks to be delivered. I'm thinking I'll be pretty satisfied with the weight but not certain.
I have a 12000 mAh batter pack(5 to 6 full iPhone charges), which is a bit large, but I'm hoping to read some books on my iPhone so I'd like to have enough battery power.
I've got a summer cap, a winter cap, and a balaclava. Is this too much? My winter cap is not comfortable to sleep in but the balaclava is.
Two t-shirts or one? I've also got a thermal top and polar fleece but will having two t shirts be worth the extra comfort of having a dry one to change into?
Pretty excited about the Eureka, Solitaire 1 Person Tent I got for $69 on amazon. It's got some pretty good reviews if you read through them.




Do I need to have a liner(like a trash bag) on the inside of my pack if I've got a pack cover. It seems very difficult to pack your things inside of the trash bag, inside your pack.
Fuel for my Pocket Rocket is not on the list because I can't fly with it. Will I be able to get fuel for it along the entire trail? I've read it's expensive and hard to find. I've also read about people who have completed their thru hike using it.
I'm a vegan and I like to eat a low fat diet. Hoping to mail lots of oatmeal,pasta,rice,dried fruit, and sport bars. (I usually eat pasta with pasta sauce and rice with some kind of soy sauce what can I do to flavor it instead?)


Please let me know if there's anything I can improve. Thanks so much!

Sierra2015
02-14-2014, 03:03
A vegan? Are you packing Braggs Liquid Amino?

kidben
02-14-2014, 03:26
No, I'm not concerned with protein. I'm concerned with getting enough carbs. It's not possible to be protein deficient if you consume a sufficient amount of carbohydrates.

AttorneyAtLunch
02-14-2014, 03:47
I'm a vegan and I like to eat a low fat diet. Hoping to mail lots of oatmeal,pasta,rice,dried fruit, and sport bars. (I usually eat pasta with pasta sauce and rice with some kind of soy sauce what can I do to flavor it instead?)

Damn, good luck staying vegan! I work at a vegan bakery/cafe so here's some food items I would take:

Quinoa - Should be your best friend. A perfect protein and some carbohydrates make it a great hiker meal.
Nuts of Any Kind - Generally full of fats and protein
Olive Oil - Tastes delicious and has the most calories you can get for the weight. Also full of good fats.

Sierra2015
02-14-2014, 04:01
Well... I'm having a hard time with low fat ideas. They seem to have a high water content.

Do you have a dehydrator?

Tbh, I wouldn't worry about staying low fat. Fat is great for satisfying you. Also is weight efficient....

Do you have a fat/carb/protein ratio you're working off of?

Sierra2015
02-14-2014, 04:05
How long have you been vegan?

While on the trail do you plan to lose weight or do you want to try and stay as close as you can to the same weight?

4eyedbuzzard
02-14-2014, 04:15
Can't say I like the tent. Can't sit up in it, nor is there room for gear. Mixed field reviews.

That's a lot of soap and hand sanitizer to carry around. If you are mailing food anyway why not put a one ounce (not three oz) bottle of each in your food drops?

Get a trash compacter bag to use as a liner. They are much tougher and don't tear as easily as trash bags. (yes, you will need some sort of waterproof liner even with a pack cover).

Interesting sock choices. I just use three pairs - one worn, one washed and drying, one dry. But your system may work. I don't know.

Debatable items: Flip flops, swisscard, two jackets, two t-shirts, pillow. All kind of fit into that "nice to have" category. Some will say take them all, some will say leave them all. Just pointing them out.

kidben
02-14-2014, 04:36
I've been a vegan for 4 years and am going strong. I rode my bike 3,000 miles in 31 days to come in 5th of 46,000 competitors in a worldwide challenge. My friend Harley who is also a vegan came in first place.

http://app.strava.com/challenges/cycling-base-mile-blast-2013

Did you hear about the raw vegan couple in their 60's who ran 366 consecutive marathons around Australia to set a world record?

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/couple-run-marathons-record-366-days-row-article-1.1563451

Quinoa is great. I'm hoping to get some lara bars and make a little trail mix. I don't recommend olive oil. Too much fat in your blood block's insulin receptors and in doing so prevents sugar from traveling to your cells effectively. Here's a good video about "is olive oil goo for you" The whole videos good but he starts talking about olive oil at about 3 minutes in.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xaciUCAT-B8

I'd like to do a 80/10/10 (carbs, fat, protein) ratio but that's hard for me to do. I'll probably have a little more fat than that.

The other tent I was consider is:

http://www.amazon.com/Eureka-Spitfire-Tent-sleeps-1/dp/B000EQ8VIS/ref=sr_1_18?ie=UTF8&qid=1392366650&sr=8-18&keywords=1+person+tent

The problem is it comes with steel stakes so I would need to buy another set which would cost more than twice as much in total.

I thought flip flops are good choice for camp shoes? Do you think there are no need for camp shoes? Do you think it's good to only bring one jacket? One is insulation the other is a rain jacket? Most people seem to bring 2 jackets. I think a pillow is important for my quality of sleep so I'd like to take a small compressible on and put in my compression sack. Maybe I will only take one t shirt. I don't know.

Sierra2015
02-14-2014, 04:43
I wasn't fighting you about it... I was a vegetarian for a while and I never felt better.


I would rethink that ratio.... 60/20/20 seems a lot healthier to me. How do you hit 80% carbs? What's your usual diet?

kidben
02-14-2014, 04:47
I don't usually hit 80% carbs but I'd like to. Sorry, I didn't mean to come off as fighting. Just expressing my comments and criticisms. I like to eat a big fruit breakfast if I can. I like to eat a lot of rice and beans and pasta and bread and potatoes and fruits and vegetables.

kidben
02-14-2014, 04:51
What's a good tent? Should I choose a different one?

Sierra2015
02-14-2014, 04:56
I don't usually hit 80% carbs but I'd like to. Sorry, I didn't mean to come off as fighting. Just expressing my comments and criticisms. I like to eat a big fruit breakfast if I can. I like to eat a lot of rice and beans and pasta and bread and potatoes and fruits and vegetables.
If you're worried about insulin levels then simple carbs are your enemy.

White rice, potatoes, pasta, bread, and fruits wreck havoc on your body.

Oil and fat is a natural insulin regulator.... It's how humans treated diabetes before we started fabricating insulin.

As a vegan I would try to eat clean and keep the sugars down.

kidben
02-14-2014, 05:01
I'm not on this forum to talk nutrition. I'd just like help with my gear.


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Sierra2015
02-14-2014, 05:02
Btw, starches are complex. Fruit is simple.*

kidben
02-14-2014, 05:05
Yes starches are complex fruit is simple. I'd just like help with my gear. Honestly.


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Sierra2015
02-14-2014, 05:07
I'm not on this forum to talk nutrition. I'd just like help with my gear.


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Hmm... Okay. I was addressing the last question since it's the only one I could help you with. Lol.

Maybe see a vegan nutritionist before you head off onto the trail. They understand this topic better than you or I. Haha.

Have a good hike. :)

kidben
02-14-2014, 05:08
Thanks! Hopefully it will be great!


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lonehiker
02-14-2014, 05:13
What's a good tent? Should I choose a different one?

When your tent comes in the mail climb into it and imagine spending 150 (appx) nights in it. Use it for a few overnight trips. Make your own decision. Everyone has different comfort level. I carry a two man tent but I like my space.

kidben
02-14-2014, 05:25
Is the extra space worth an extra 2 lbs? 1 person tent is about 3 lbs and 2 person tent is about 5 lbs.

Hill Ape
02-14-2014, 05:26
I'm not on this forum to talk nutrition. I'd just like help with my gear.


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and yet, you presented it in your OP, others that are knowledgeable tried to engage you about it, no one was confrontational or judgemental, except maybe you, you twice got worked up about. perhaps you are a little too sensitive about it. just because you started the thread doesn't give you control about what is said. enjoy your hike

kidben
02-14-2014, 05:36
I asked about flavoring pasta and rice. Then they said I should eat more protein and fat and I explained why I think that's not right. I wrote a post about gear and one sentence about my diet and most of the responses are about my diet? I made the OP because I'd like feedback on my gear. If people want to talk about something besides my gear, why can't I say I don't want to continue talking about that one detail and that I'd like to talk more about gear?

lonehiker
02-14-2014, 05:38
Is the extra space worth an extra 2 lbs? 1 person tent is about 3 lbs and 2 person tent is about 5 lbs.

Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2 is 2lb 2oz. Many other options that may even be lighter albeit much more expensive than your choice. Key is if it works for you stay with it. I only threw out what I like to show you that every person will have a different comfort level. But to answer your question, yes, the extra space is worth the weight for me.

4eyedbuzzard
02-14-2014, 05:42
What's a good tent? Should I choose a different one?Can't say. I use a tarp with bug net or hammock these days. Lots of folks here like Tarptents and Lightheart Gear tents and some others. But just from experience when I used small tents, if you can't sit up in it and can't bring your pack and gear inside with you, it's a real PIA especially in bad weather when you most need it. When your tent comes if you don't like it return it. You've still got a month to work out details. Check here everyday on WB in the Selling Used Gear Forum - there have been several tents like these sold recently. There's always ebay as well. Make sure though that you seam seal (McNett SilNet) any tent that doesn't have taped seams before using it.

Sierra2015
02-14-2014, 05:52
I asked about flavoring pasta and rice. Then they said I should eat more protein and fat and I explained why I think that's not right. I wrote a post about gear and one sentence about my diet and most of the responses are about my diet? I made the OP because I'd like feedback on my gear. If people want to talk about something besides my gear, why can't I say I don't want to continue talking about that one detail and that I'd like to talk more about gear?
I asked all those questions because I needed to know the parameters. Braggs liquid amino is great for flavoring rice and quinoa. Also healthier than soy sauce....

You never said if you have a dehydrator.... If you do then I'd cook and dehydrate some garbanzo beans and then crush them up. Add garlic and whatever else you like. You can add that mix to the pot when you're cooking up your quinoa.

kidben
02-14-2014, 05:52
I can still cancel the tent I ordered before it ships. If you're all wet can you still bring all your gear into your tent? I have money to get a better tent if I needed to but I'm not sure. Is the extra space and lighter weight worth the high price? I like to be comfortable but I also like things that are functional and economic.

lonehiker
02-14-2014, 05:53
What's a good tent? Should I choose a different one?

One last thought. You may stay in shelters virtually every night. If this is the case then your choice may be perfect. Just in case shelters are full you would have your tent as a backup.

Sierra2015
02-14-2014, 05:56
Oh, and I never said you should eat more protein and fat. I talked in terms of what's considered healthier.

I'm sorry if you felt attacked. I'm sure you get a lot of flack over your diet. I am just trying to help through questions and friendly conversation.

kidben
02-14-2014, 05:58
I didn't realize you meant brags for flavor, but I don't consider protein isolate healthy. I don't have a dehydrator but that's a cool idea with the garbanzo beans!

kidben
02-14-2014, 06:01
No, it's fine. Everyone has such different opinions about food it's hard to have a normal conversation.

4eyedbuzzard
02-14-2014, 06:02
One last thought. You may stay in shelters virtually every night. If this is the case then your choice may be perfect. Just in case shelters are full you would have your tent as a backup.Quite true. Many who start out thinking or saying they will not stay in shelters find them all too convenient. Quite a few of people hate AT shelters for a variety of reasons - mice, snoring, hard floors, cold, etc. But they have many things going for them: they are there already set up and ready to go, they're dry, they're safer than a tent in windy weather (falling branches and trees) and/or electrical storms, usually near a water supply and privy and fire ring, offer a place to cook out of the wind and rain, and many people (not all) enjoy the social aspect as well. If a tent is carried only as a back-up, then yes, almost anything will do.

kidben
02-14-2014, 06:07
I imagine spending a lot of nights in shelters and a lot in a tent. With functionality and pricing as priorities it doesn't seem to make sense to spend a lot more on a ultralight and more spacious tent. A one person tent just seems like a no brainer. Maybe I'll try out the Eureka Solitaire in my backyard for a few nights. It's cold and wet here in DC so if I'm comfortable here I shouldn't have to worry about it on the trail.

Sierra2015
02-14-2014, 06:13
Why not for $69. That's a great price.

Not much of a loss if you don't like it.

kidben
02-14-2014, 06:22
I think I’m going to leave the swiss card at home and only take one t shirt. I’ll try to find a trash compactor bag to use as a liner(I have the Osprey 65 which has a divider at the bottom. Should everything be in the trash compactor or should I maybe put the dry sacks of food or clothes under the divider at the bottom of the bag?) I think I'll try out the Solitaire for sure. One of the reviews says "I thru-hiked the 2,655 mile Pacific Crest Trail." (in the $69 tent!) One of the last things I'm wondering about is will the pocket rocket stove workout?

kidben
02-14-2014, 06:29
Also I'm wondering don't most people think a pair of camp shoes is a good idea? It seems like a good idea to take a pair of light flip flops to walk around with in my injini liners in camp. When I have my final list I'd like to calculate exactly what all my gear cost me (I bought and resold a lot of stuff because I was dumb) and maybe post a video.

ChuckT
02-14-2014, 08:47
I always use camp shoes. In the pm giving my dogs cool air is heaven. I _had_ hard sole moccasins (evolved to them after trying several other sets) and now have a pair of shoes for kayakers. Don't recall the brand.
I found I needed hard soles to protect, water proof to shed the morning dew and light weight. Also if the fit is loose I can put them on over socks. So I'm looking for goretex or neoprene booties to wear with them.

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LAF
02-14-2014, 09:31
Good camp shoes have been pointed out /discussed at length in another thread; the faves seem to be the vivobarefoot ultra pure as posted by hikerboy57. I picked up a par on amazon for $40. 7.2 oz for the pair I have, good for camp, water xings if you want....


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Outdoorsman88
02-14-2014, 10:35
I have a Eureka solitaire, and hate it to be honest. I'm around 6' tall. Have taken it on two separate 2-nighters. There is not really room for your gear inside, and the vestibules are insanely small. I was so cramped inside it that moving around made my legs cramp up. There is literally no room to move, I felt like I was in a coffin honestly. But, just one man's opinion...

DeerPath
02-14-2014, 10:51
I'm not on this forum to talk nutrition. I'd just like help with my gear.


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I suggest ZPacks, http://www.zpacks.com/shelter/hexamid.shtml 15.9 oz. I have the SoloPlus and love it. Plenty of room.
Happy Trails

kidben
02-14-2014, 12:50
Should I get one of these? I'm a afraid it's too heavy.

http://www.amazon.com/ALPS-Mountaineering-Extreme-2-Person-Tent/dp/B00BF3T8W2/ref=sr_1_11?ie=UTF8&qid=1392396533&sr=8-11&keywords=two+person+tent

Sierra2015
02-14-2014, 13:16
Maybe a one person tent with a vestibule.

But... $69 isn't much of a loss if you don't like the first tent! Maybe try it out and if you can't stand it you can always switch it out while on the trail....

Hill Ape
02-14-2014, 13:23
6lb 8oz for 170

compare that to a

six moon lunar duo is on sale now for 110, 3 1/2 lb

Sierra2015
02-14-2014, 13:34
6lb 8oz for 170

compare that to a

six moon lunar duo is on sale now for 110, 3 1/2 lb
That's a great deal!

http://www.sixmoondesigns.com/tents/outfitter.html

danielpflood
02-14-2014, 13:35
No, I'm not concerned with protein. I'm concerned with getting enough carbs. It's not possible to be protein deficient if you consume a sufficient amount of carbohydrates.

... I love you. Not too many people understand this, it always makes me happy to talk to someone who does. I hope to see you on the trail man! Ill be leaving March 4/5.

Kingbee
02-14-2014, 13:58
I have a Big Agnes Seedhouse UL1 and it's great. Plenty of room in the vestibule for pack and boots.

25945

CarlZ993
02-14-2014, 15:20
I think Im going to leave the swiss card at home and only take one t shirt. Ill try to find a trash compactor bag to use as a liner(I have the Osprey 65 which has a divider at the bottom. Should everything be in the trash compactor or should I maybe put the dry sacks of food or clothes under the divider at the bottom of the bag?) I think I'll try out the Solitaire for sure. One of the reviews says "I thru-hiked the 2,655 mile Pacific Crest Trail." (in the $69 tent!) One of the last things I'm wondering about is will the pocket rocket stove workout?
I would unzip the divider at the very least. Easier to pack stuff & fill every nook & cranny. If it was my pack, I'd cut out the divider. Use the trash compactor bag to keep everything your want dry - clothing, sleeping bag, tent body, etc - inside it. Everything thing else can go outside the compactor bag. My food bag was highly water resistant (supposed to be water proof). I didn't put it in the trash compactor.

You can successfully thru-hike using a $69 tent. I wouldn't. I'd get something lighter & more storm-worthy. It should be noted that some PCT hikers don't have to put up their shelter very often. I read a trail journal of one thru-hiker who only put up his tarp tent 4 or 5 times the entire way (much drier out West). Not so on the AT. As noted above, Big Agnes makes some nice tents - Fly Creek & Copper Spur. I'd look really hard at the Copper Spur UL-1 if I was a new wanna-be thru-hiker. Sweet tent (fyi - I have the Fly Creek UL-2). As it was, I mainly used shelters & occasionally used my tent. Convenient & I enjoyed (for the most part) the novelty of sleeping in shelters. Especially in all the bad weather we had last year.

The Pocket Rocket stove is a popular canister stove that can be purchased at a reasonable price. You should have no problems with it. Note: I used an alcohol stove on my AT hike. If I were to do it again, I'd probably carry a canister stove (I have the PR & two others that are a little lighter than the PR).

Whatever you decide upon, it isn't something that is etched in stone. If it works, great. If it doesn't, swap it out for something that does. Early on, pay attention to what some of the other hikers are using. They'll give you the good, bad, & ugly about what they're carrying.

Wish you luck on your hike. Hope the 2014 class has better weather than we did.

kidben
02-15-2014, 02:18
... I love you. Not too many people understand this, it always makes me happy to talk to someone who does. I hope to see you on the trail man! Ill be leaving March 4/5.

Yes! Thank you. It's hard when your opinion is with the minority of people and no one understands. I'll probably have a slow start but yes, hopefully I'll see you out there too!


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Hill Ape
02-15-2014, 04:20
do you feel like someone attacked you about being vegan? plenty of people understand diet choices man. three weeks after starting, just about the only thing hikers talk about is food. thats the crowd you came to. when the impossible goal is 5000 calories, its all you think about.

you don't own the thread you start, many others will read and possibly benefit from the dialogue, for years to come sometimes. maybe use the straight forward board if you're so focused.

Scooter2
02-15-2014, 12:02
How about a tarptent squall2? Just over two pounds with extra space for gear for $259

http://www.tarptent.com/squall2.html

Hill Ape
02-15-2014, 12:38
i'd sell you a tart tent virga (predecessor to the contrail) for a really good price, it is missing its back curved pole but henry would probably hook up with that. its front pole set is a hiking pole its a 1+ size, mean you and gear, with a decent vestibult. i got it modded out with floor and front entry doors. i loved it for years, replaced with a six moon trekker.

Hill Ape
02-15-2014, 12:41
it is a single wall tent, with venting along the bottom that can be belayed down to the ground to close up tight, very versatile. but being single wall, there is a bit of a learning curve on how to set it up with the wind. it is not freestanding, but i've never had a problem with that. i haven't used a freestanding in 10+ years

TheCheek
02-16-2014, 15:38
Get a trash compacter bag to use as a liner. They are much tougher and don't tear as easily as trash bags. (yes, you will need some sort of waterproof liner even with a pack cover).


Agreed. Also if you want to save weight and don't care about looking good, you can skip the pack cover and the interior trash compactor bag. Instead use only a trash compacter bag on the outside of your pack. I cut two long vertical slits in the bag for arms/pack straps, and hiked through many a rainstorms and drizzles during my 2005 thru with no leaks and almost never had wet gear except when I had to pack up a wet tent, but that wasn't because the method of a trash bag on the outside of my pack failed me....
Those things are tough too... With proper use and taking care, I only went through 2 of them the whole way. Needless to say I am a big proponent of extremely cheap, extremely dry and reliable, yet ugly looking pack cover solutions!
The Cheek GA->ME '05

joannaxvx
02-18-2014, 03:09
I've been viewing the forums for awhile now but seeing a fellow vegan aspiring thru-hiker finally prompted me to register (I would've done it soon enough) so I could offer some advice. First off, nice choices on the socks. I'm going with the same approach and I like to think it'll work out well. As far as clothing, I'd suggest having a separate set that will be solely for camp use/sleeping in and therefore always dry. I'm sorta in the same boat as you about the hats and balaclava so maybe someone else can provide some insight? For food, tortillas seem like an easy way to get a ton of carbs. Maybe hot sauce for flavoring? I'm bringing mixes of different seasonings to change up the taste of the same old stuff (think Mexican spices, Italian, Indian, etc.). And nutritional yeast!

Sierra2015
02-18-2014, 03:21
I've been viewing the forums for awhile now but seeing a fellow vegan aspiring thru-hiker finally prompted me to register (I would've done it soon enough) so I could offer some advice. First off, nice choices on the socks. I'm going with the same approach and I like to think it'll work out well. As far as clothing, I'd suggest having a separate set that will be solely for camp use/sleeping in and therefore always dry. I'm sorta in the same boat as you about the hats and balaclava so maybe someone else can provide some insight? For food, tortillas seem like an easy way to get a ton of carbs. Maybe hot sauce for flavoring? I'm bringing mixes of different seasonings to change up the taste of the same old stuff (think Mexican spices, Italian, Indian, etc.). And nutritional yeast!
Hi there, I was never vegan but I have spent some time as a vegetarian and I have several friends who are either vegan or vegetarian.

Out of curiosity, what are some examples for meals? Rice and beans probably. :p Are you going to carry coconut oil? How about dried seaweed?

Hill Ape
02-18-2014, 03:30
pack it gourmet has some great vegetarian meals, a little expensive but that are great ideas to play with cooking your own and dehydrating

joannaxvx
02-18-2014, 23:38
Hi there, I was never vegan but I have spent some time as a vegetarian and I have several friends who are either vegan or vegetarian.

Out of curiosity, what are some examples for meals? Rice and beans probably. :p Are you going to carry coconut oil? How about dried seaweed?

Haha yeah rice and beans, quinoa, couscous. Some Tasty Bite meals are vegan and (appropriately) tasty! Tortillas or bagels with peanut butter, maybe hummus. [Oh, that reminds me, to the OP, I was going to suggest PB2 or that other brand of dehydrated peanut butter since they're much lower in fat than regular peanut butter.] I didn't really think about coconut oil but I might look into it now that you mentioned it. The multiple uses are a plus! I was going to carry olive oil. And I unfortunately don't like the aftertaste of dried seaweed.

Sierra2015
02-19-2014, 03:35
Haha yeah rice and beans, quinoa, couscous. Some Tasty Bite meals are vegan and (appropriately) tasty! Tortillas or bagels with peanut butter, maybe hummus. [Oh, that reminds me, to the OP, I was going to suggest PB2 or that other brand of dehydrated peanut butter since they're much lower in fat than regular peanut butter.] I didn't really think about coconut oil but I might look into it now that you mentioned it. The multiple uses are a plus! I was going to carry olive oil. And I unfortunately don't like the aftertaste of dried seaweed.
If you mix pb2 with a hot chocolate mix.... Crazy amazing! Also makes a tasty pancake.

Coconut oil works well with Indian spices.

I read on another thread there's powdered hummus. Which would be super convenient for you.

Hill Ape
02-19-2014, 03:48
I read on another thread there's powdered hummus. Which would be super convenient for you.

fantastic world foods. they make a variety of powdered stuffs. never understood why they don't market to backpackers, maybe ignorance of a market. their tofu scrambler is awesome.

GirlfromOZ
02-19-2014, 07:39
I'd say camp shoes are worth taking on any extended trip, but don't have the practical AT experience to back it up. I do know that on my last trip I had wished for a camp shoe slightly more substantial than flip flops, so if your weight budget allows I'd maybe get something else.

I think the problem with picking a tent is that there are no two reviews the same!!
I bit the bullet and went with the TarpTent Double Rainbow... I went with the extra weight of the 2man after stuffing my pack full of pillows and walking into my local supplier, than climbing myself inside the only 1man they had, pulling the pack in and zipping myself in.... Pretty sure the staff thought I was mental... But I crawled back out 5 mins later, said thank you politely and went right home to order online. I'm still second guessing myself after having a comfortable night in it!!

For food flavouring options I'd take salsa and tortillas to make lunch burritos (with your beans) and peanut butter can be an alternative flavour for rice that the standard soy plus if you get one of the chunky salsas it's ok with rice too. :)


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joannaxvx
02-19-2014, 09:49
If you mix pb2 with a hot chocolate mix.... Crazy amazing! Also makes a tasty pancake.

Coconut oil works well with Indian spices.

I read on another thread there's powdered hummus. Which would be super convenient for you.

ooo that does sound amazing! I haven't really sought out a vegan hot chocolate mix though. I'm sure there's some somewhere. And I actually attempted to make my own dehydrated hummus! Well, I dehydrated store-bought hummus. I'm definitely going to look out for the brand that Hill Ape mentioned. Powdered tofu scramble? Sign me up!

Sierra2015
02-19-2014, 09:58
ooo that does sound amazing! I haven't really sought out a vegan hot chocolate mix though. I'm sure there's some somewhere. And I actually attempted to make my own dehydrated hummus! Well, I dehydrated store-bought hummus. I'm definitely going to look out for the brand that Hill Ape mentioned. Powdered tofu scramble? Sign me up!
Buy pure chocolate powder and mix with... almond or coconut milk? How well does almond milk heat? Not well I wouldn't think....

I would dehydrate garbanzo beans by themselves. Powder them via a mixer and then later you could rehydrate with olive oil. And add whatever hummus seasonings you like. Garlic or or onion powder or celery salt.

joannaxvx
02-19-2014, 10:14
Buy pure chocolate powder and mix with... almond or coconut milk? How well does almond milk heat? Not well I wouldn't think....

I would dehydrate garbanzo beans by themselves. Powder them via a mixer and then later you could rehydrate with olive oil. And add whatever hummus seasonings you like. Garlic or or onion powder or celery salt.

Nut milks heat up well. I know powdered soy milk exists somewhere too but I haven't found that yet either. And that sounds like a good idea for the hummus. I was able to turn mine into a powder so it should be good.

joannaxvx
02-19-2014, 10:16
fantastic world foods. they make a variety of powdered stuffs. never understood why they don't market to backpackers, maybe ignorance of a market. their tofu scrambler is awesome.

Everything they make looks awesome! I never heard of them before but I used their store locator and they have some near me so I need to check them out. Some of that would be great to find along the trail. Maybe more so in the summer time when that much sodium would be more helpful than harmful =/

Kc Fiedler
02-21-2014, 01:05
I read about two pages of this. I'm not going to give you specific advice because your hiking style and my hiking style are night and day. What I can suggest with a lot of certainty, however, is that you need to get some time on the trail learning how to use your gear. Asking things like "Can I get in to my tent if I'm all wet?" tells me that you don't have much experience. Which is fine. But it's going to make it very very difficult to buy gear with any reasonable insight. You will have to try a tent, try different methods for staying dry, figure out how to get in and out without soaking your bag while it's raining, etc. You're going to have to try and fail a few dozen times before this all falls into place.

There are a lot of people here with a lot of valuable knowledge. But a lot of what you really need to know is going to have to be learned the hard way, it seems.

Side note about your diet. Carrying a 80%-90% carb based food supply is going to be heavy and quite possibly bulky. You probably already know this. Good luck!

TheCheek
02-23-2014, 08:50
Btw the idea of gear list reviews is for people who know they are inexperienced to get specific advice from those who are as opposed to "look here son, I can tell from reading a few words of yours that you have no idea what to do and are gonna have a hard time. Good luck to you." (tone of previous post)

So anyway, my specific advice having thru hiked already, is that your gear list looks great, you've got all of the essentials, you don't need to be experienced AT ALL to successfully thru hike, and you will be fine. It's easier to figure out modifications as you go than before you go, and there are a lot of outdoor living tips and tricks that you can pick up by talking with the others who are actually hiking out there with you experiencing what the trail has to offer.
I hope your hike is fantastic!


Sent from my iPod touch using Tapatalk

DumbAss
02-24-2014, 23:01
No, I'm not concerned with protein. I'm concerned with getting enough carbs. It's not possible to be protein deficient if you consume a sufficient amount of carbohydrates.

Whenever words like impossible are used I listen carefully because information is always coming from a person who already knows everything. After 30 years as a nutritionist, world champion, 10 time all American and paid consultant I am very interested in learning how the body can produce the amino and mass amino acids it needs from carbs. If you have time please teach me or refer me.

It is fine for you to believe this statement if you choose but it could kill someone. Certainly shorten their life and deter from their quality of life. There are many malleable minds out there. Half of the amino acids (i.e. essential amino acids) required by the human body can not be internally synthesized because we do not have the enzymes needed.

There have been many hikers that have exhibited all sorts of disease symptoms at the end of a thru hike from missing elements of their diet so be careful. At the very least spend as much time studying micronutrient and macronutrient sources and usage, and nutrition in general as you do on gear. If you eat right you can comfortably carry far heavier loads and maintain your brain chemistry balance. In other words have a lot more fun along the way. I do not know of any world class athlete that would say that nutrition plays less than a 50% role in their performance. Most of the current generation of distance hikers have not yet begun to focus on nutrition as much as other athletes have but that is starting to change.

Macro nutrient needs vary from person to person depending on their fitness level, percent of fat to muscle, avg heart rate during exercise (which changes daily depending on prior days work load, prior days diet, prior nights rest, current work load, food consumed during exercise etc etc). If you are eating 4000 calories a day 10% or 100 grams of the right proteins might be enough, again depending on many factors but it probably is not.

As for gear. Drop one of the t shirts and add a military ECWCS level 1 silk weight polartec base layer. Wicks like crazy, dries super fast, cheap and very versatile as a layering piece or on its own.

Kc Fiedler
02-25-2014, 12:38
There have been many hikers that have exhibited all sorts of disease symptoms at the end of a thru hike from missing elements of their diet so be careful..

Hey DumbAss, you seem like you want to put forth a pretty reputable public image. Could you help out the hiking community by citing these cases of disease symptoms and letting us know exactly what elements of their diet were missing which caused the symptoms?

Edit for spelling.

rafe
02-25-2014, 13:08
What's a good tent? Should I choose a different one?

I still have my Eureka Solitaire from 1990 and it served me very well, within limits. Space is tight, but it's light and double-walled; I was never wet, in any conditions. Had to park the pack outdoors, though. The tiny footprint can be advantage in stealth situations.

For a long while it was the lightest double-walled tent you could buy. There may be better choices now. Been using a Shires Tarptent Rainbow since 2007. It's lighter, with much more headroom and floor space. On the downside it's single-walled so you have to deal with condensation. Big Agnes Seedhouse is another I'd look at.

DumbAss
02-25-2014, 17:24
Hey DumbAss, you seem like you want to put forth a pretty reputable public image. Could you help out the hiking community by citing these cases of disease symptoms and letting us know exactly what elements of their diet were missing which caused the symptoms?

Edit for spelling.

A member asked me to respond to that statement. My only concern is that my point have enough credibility to make people think. No one here knows me so my image is irrelevant. The previous point is quite dangerous. I would much rather you research both points and decide for yourself. Awareness of diet will improve everyones lives.

My statement to the person who asked me to respond was that it would do no good but I would post to possibly help another reader. I will not waste my time giving free advice again.

Last weekend I met a researcher at an AT crossroad that was asking about norovirus. Wilderness diarrhea is a vitamin deficiency, Lime and others are more easily acquired when the immune system is weakened from dietary deficiency. do the rest of the research yourself.

Last Call
02-25-2014, 19:12
I have found limes to be an excellent source of vitamin C. HYOH.

Kc Fiedler
02-25-2014, 19:55
A member asked me to respond to that statement. My only concern is that my point have enough credibility to make people think. No one here knows me so my image is irrelevant. The previous point is quite dangerous. I would much rather you research both points and decide for yourself. Awareness of diet will improve everyones lives.

My statement to the person who asked me to respond was that it would do no good but I would post to possibly help another reader. I will not waste my time giving free advice again.

Last weekend I met a researcher at an AT crossroad that was asking about norovirus. Wilderness diarrhea is a vitamin deficiency, Lime and others are more easily acquired when the immune system is weakened from dietary deficiency. do the rest of the research yourself.

Thanks for contributing.

dudeijuststarted
02-25-2014, 20:43
Out of curiosity, what's your total clothing weight? I'm in FL and unable to really test things out. Here's what I've got:

- 1 pair Ijinji toe liners
- 2 pair DT socks (regular)
- Minus 33 Merino briefs (camp)
- Exofficio briefs
- 2 UA Coldgear base tops (not fleece lined)
- 1 UA Coldgear base bottoms (hike - not fleece lined)
- 1 fleece baselayer bottoms (camp)
- 1 Woolrich Barnstormer Merino sweater
- 1 Outdoor Research down jacket
- 1 REI rain shell jacket
- 1 Army/Navy wool watch cap (camp)
- 1 NorthFace Polartec cap (hike - so i'm not constantly venting my head)
- 1 Reebok dryfit tshirt
- 1 Sierra designs wind pants
- - 1 Columbia Ballistic III fleece wind shell jacket - this thing is heavy and bulky, but it looks like a great wind killer. I don't know what to expect up there with a start date of 3/22. Do I take this thing and drop it, or swap it out for more, lighter and less bulky layers?

Still hunting down:
- Wool mittens
- Scarf?
- Camp shoes (probably go with crocs)

Ideas on what I can drop/replace?

kunzman
03-01-2014, 13:10
You will want to change out your tent stakes on the Eureka. They are steel and quite heavy and that tent takes quite a few for it to work. It takes at least 8, but I think 8 more if you want to stake out the fly away from the main body of it. If you are short and not to large around the middle, it's a great tent for the price. My son uses it for camping.

kidben
03-10-2014, 23:14
I've been viewing the forums for awhile now but seeing a fellow vegan aspiring thru-hiker finally prompted me to register (I would've done it soon enough) so I could offer some advice. First off, nice choices on the socks. I'm going with the same approach and I like to think it'll work out well. As far as clothing, I'd suggest having a separate set that will be solely for camp use/sleeping in and therefore always dry. I'm sorta in the same boat as you about the hats and balaclava so maybe someone else can provide some insight? For food, tortillas seem like an easy way to get a ton of carbs. Maybe hot sauce for flavoring? I'm bringing mixes of different seasonings to change up the taste of the same old stuff (think Mexican spices, Italian, Indian, etc.). And nutritional yeast!

Hey glad to hear from a fellow vegan! I threw in a third pair of socks and I'm only taking one pair of sock liners instead of two. We'll see how that goes. I'm just going to take a beanie cap for cold weather and a rainproof cycling style cap for warm weather. Tortillas are a decent idea! I got some "near east couscous" which comes in three vegan flavors(little seasoning packets), and it's extremely easy and quick to cook. Happy hiking!

kidben
03-10-2014, 23:41
I've decided to go with the MSR Hubba 1 person tent! Seems like a high value tent! I tried it out twice and got light rain one night and light snow another night. I was completely dry! I'm 5'10" and can sit completely upright without my head touching. It is a freestanding tent. There are two small mesh pockets inside to store gear like glasses, headlamp, phone, etc for easy access. I also got the Hubba footprint and it fit's into the tent's sack easily. It comes with some lightweight aluminum stakes. The vestibule is a very nice size that allows me to keep my Opsrey Atmos 65 pack dry. The tent weighs 3 lb. 6 oz (including tent, poles, 6 stakes, rainfly, footprint, and stuff sack) I bought the tent new on amazon for $229.97. I payed $39.95 for the footprint for a combined total of $269.92.

I'm flying to Atlanta on March 16th and will be on Springer by that afternoon. I'm not doing the approach trail. Hope to see you all out there!

kidben
03-11-2014, 00:14
Out of curiosity, what's your total clothing weight? I'm in FL and unable to really test things out. Here's what I've got:

- 1 pair Ijinji toe liners
- 2 pair DT socks (regular)
- Minus 33 Merino briefs (camp)
- Exofficio briefs
- 2 UA Coldgear base tops (not fleece lined)
- 1 UA Coldgear base bottoms (hike - not fleece lined)
- 1 fleece baselayer bottoms (camp)
- 1 Woolrich Barnstormer Merino sweater
- 1 Outdoor Research down jacket
- 1 REI rain shell jacket
- 1 Army/Navy wool watch cap (camp)
- 1 NorthFace Polartec cap (hike - so i'm not constantly venting my head)
- 1 Reebok dryfit tshirt
- 1 Sierra designs wind pants
- - 1 Columbia Ballistic III fleece wind shell jacket - this thing is heavy and bulky, but it looks like a great wind killer. I don't know what to expect up there with a start date of 3/22. Do I take this thing and drop it, or swap it out for more, lighter and less bulky layers?

Still hunting down:
- Wool mittens
- Scarf?
- Camp shoes (probably go with crocs)

Ideas on what I can drop/replace?

Clothes List:

1 pair Injinji sock liners
1 pair regular Darn Tough Socks
1 pair thick Darn Tough Socks
1 pair Patagonia Merino Socks
1 pair Exofficio briefs
1 synthetic base layer bottoms
1 mountain hard wear zip off pants
1 synthetic t shirt
1 synthetic base layer top
1 polar fleece
1 synthetic patagonia jacket
1 north face rain jacket
1 pair synthetic Sugoi gloves
1 north face beanie
1 Shower Pass Waterproof Cycling Cap

Total Weight: 5 lb. 9.5oz (including 10L Sealline Sack)

Oh, I forgot to include the weight of some cheap flip flops I'll be bringing for camp shoes. They weigh an additional 9.5 oz (not included in the previous total weight listed above.)

Of course it won't way this much in my pack because I'll be wearing a lot of the clothes.