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loners4me
03-03-2014, 08:59
Great site guys.

Im doing a 30 mile hike with son. Expected temps will be 50s during the day and 40s at night. I have spent a fortune and am in need of a few items. Last year my son slept 8 nights on a $1 inflatable pool mat. Could I get by with that for 2 nights on the trail?


Also, I purchased 2 of these. Think Ill have to supplement for warmth?

loners4me
03-03-2014, 09:00
8 nights ( in a florida canpground in August)

loners4me
03-03-2014, 09:01
http://mobile.walmart.com/ip/Ozark-Trail-32-Degree-Down-Mummy-Sleeping-Bag/22008955?type=search. Sorry still figuring the site out

fredmugs
03-03-2014, 09:11
In my experience if you check the forecasted lows for any area where you'll be sleeping on the trail it will be a good 10 degrees colder than that. Kids never seem to have a problem sleeping so the pool mat will work fine - I have used them myself with mixed success but I weigh 200 lbs. You also didn't say where you'll be hiking.

HooKooDooKu
03-03-2014, 10:19
First of all, if you're going to look to Wally World for and $80 kids sleeping bag, I've got to suggest that you look at kids sleeping bags from some REAL camping retailers. For example, you can get a bag that is listed as being slightly warmer from REI (http://www.rei.com/product/795048/rei-nodder-sleeping-bag-kids#specsTab) for the exact same price.

The next thing to consider... at age 10, your son might already be pushing the size limits for a "kids" bag... if not now, then he will be in just a year or so. So think about getting a regular size sleeping bag.

And of course keep in mind that sleeping bag ratings seem to be more geared toward "survivability" and not comfort. So take at least 10 degrees off any sleeping bag's rating.

There's several places that have clearance sales trying to dump their remaining merchandise from last year. So look around, there's some bargains to be had. Retailer's I would suggest include Campmor.com, REI.com, campsaver.com, backcountry.com, and sierratradingpost.com. Make sure you look for online coupons as well.

As for sleeping pads, kids weight so little, they can make due with not very much. So he should be able to make due with something as cheap as the WalMart Blue Closed-Cell Foam mat (http://www.walmart.com/ip/Stansport-Pack-Lite-Camping-Pad/9856753). But it makes for something that is bulky to pack... you pretty much have to find a way to lash it to the outside of the pack. So I spent the money for my boys to have the Thermarest Prolite. The weight and pack size is about the same as the Thermarest NeoAir everyone raves about, but is cheaper.

Mine use the thermarest prolite. It's only 1" thick (and a lot more expensive than

Tuckahoe
03-03-2014, 10:31
I do not own the Oazark Trails bag but I have followed many if the reviews. It's been discussed quite a bit on Hammockforums.net because a number of members have bought the bag to convert into inexpensive top quilts. Over all the bag gets fairly favorable reviews for the fact that it's a cheap down bag. The two points that do seem to be issues is that the fill material apparently tends to have a higher amount of feathers mixed in with the down; especially compared to higher quality bags. The second issue seems to be the uneven distribution of the fill through the bag. But it shouldn't be difficult to shift the down around here needed.

FarmerChef
03-03-2014, 10:39
My kids have hike almost the entire AT on blue closed-cell mats from Wal Mart. They are cheap and more than sufficient for their weight/needs/comfort. Just cut the mat down to size as appropriate, roll it up and last it to the pack with a bit of tent cord. They are very light and easy to work with. For a few more dollars consider a z-rest. You still have to lash it to the outside of the pack but it folds flat. The pool mat can still work fine though.

As for your bags, if you're hiking with predicted lows in the 40s you should be fine with a 32 degree bag. But as others have said it doesn't mean you will be comfortable. Be prepared to wear some clothes to bed if you're not warm enough. And it's always a good idea to test the bag out in the temps/conditions you anticipate before you get out on the trail for 10 days and realize on day 2 that it's not cutting the mustard. :)

Above all make sure the trip is fun for your son and leaves him wishing you could stay longer.

Feral Bill
03-03-2014, 10:51
30 miles in three days might be a bit much for a ten year old, or might not. You know your son. It depends on terrain, weather, motivation and fitness. And + 1 on the blue foam, if only because it's hard to destroy.

q-tip
03-03-2014, 11:05
I am always about planning for failureof equipmnt and the risk. So, the question is, what is the risk to your son and his safety if it fails. It only takes a litle prick for this to go flat. In those temps, it would be a long night or two. I you have in fact spent a fourtune, take the next step and get a Thermarest Neo Air. I have 1200 miles on mine and it is heavenly. Just some thoughts...

OCDave
03-03-2014, 11:52
If you've spent a fortune don't cheap out on your son's comfort. You'll want his experience to be as enjoyable as possible. If he is going to be expected to carry is own sleeping bag, make sure it is something light as well as warm. An inflatable pool mat is NOT suitable for his comfort; again, you will want his experience to be as enjoyable as possible.

I took my very gung-ho 9-year-old on the trail last summer. We hiked 6miles, 10 miles, zero miles and finally 6 miles over 4 days. He was ~75 lbs and his pack was ~ 10lbs. It was not uncommon for me to carry his pack as well as my own. Expect your breaks to be double and triple as long as you would expect.

Finally: You will want HIS expereience to be as enjoyable as possible.

Good Luck

Teacher & Snacktime
03-03-2014, 13:06
You can get a Kelty Cosmic Down 20* bag for under $100 if you look for clearances. I got one online and one at REI. I personally have no real problem with Walmart - Outdoor Products or Ozark Trail - products, especially for short-term expectations and knowing what kids will do to them. But if you're paying $80, you might as well pay $95 and get quality.

However, if you're talking about that 1 lb Ozark Trail Down 0* bag for 79.99, let me know how that works out. It's one of those "too good to be true" things in my mind.

Enjoy your hike. Nine/ten is the start of the BEST age for adventures with kids!

slbirdnerd
03-03-2014, 13:19
My now 11-year-old Scout sleeps like a baby on his Thermarest Solite. They are durable and fairly cheap. He actually likes having it in his loops at the bottom of the pack, helps it stay standing up when you set the pack down. You can get it in 48 inches which is cheaper and less bulky, if it works for him. (I actually use the 48 inch one in summer.)

HooKooDooKu
03-03-2014, 14:18
He was ~75 lbs and his pack was ~ 10lbs.
The rule of thumb I've always been taught is that the entire pack weight shouldn't exceed 20% of the child's own weight.

I've been hiking with my sons since they each reached about 6yo. The boys have always been required had to carry their own pack. Back when they only weighted 50lbs, I managed to keep them to 10lbs buy limiting them to a small pack, their sleeping bag, sleeping pad, and cloths.

Feral Bill
03-03-2014, 15:08
Yes, keep his pack weight low but he should carry his personal stuff, plus maybe snack food. He'll be more invested in the trip. I was just looking at pictures of my kids hiking at that age. Both remain outdoor enthusiasts. Take some, and you'll be glad you did.

loners4me
03-03-2014, 16:20
OK OP here, I want the kid to enjoy the trip. I was checking out ebay looking at used bags. Seems like alot of folks use them a few times only to sell them and looks like some good deals to be had. I, however don't know crap about good sleeping bags for hiking.
If you were gonna spend $90-$100 or so on a ebay bag, which would you pick?

I saw a mountain hardwear womens bag that looked good. Orange and black so the colors are fine.

saltysack
03-03-2014, 16:38
Buy the kelty cosmic down 20 deg...great fairly light bag he can use for years


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

perdidochas
03-03-2014, 17:30
Great site guys.

Im doing a 30 mile hike with son. Expected temps will be 50s during the day and 40s at night. I have spent a fortune and am in need of a few items. Last year my son slept 8 nights on a $1 inflatable pool mat. Could I get by with that for 2 nights on the trail?


Also, I purchased 2 of these. Think Ill have to supplement for warmth?

I'd get these for pads. They are bulletproof, unlike the pool mats.

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Ozark-Trial-Camping-Pad-Blue/16783660

perdidochas
03-03-2014, 17:32
Great site guys.

Im doing a 30 mile hike with son. Expected temps will be 50s during the day and 40s at night. I have spent a fortune and am in need of a few items. Last year my son slept 8 nights on a $1 inflatable pool mat. Could I get by with that for 2 nights on the trail?


Also, I purchased 2 of these. Think Ill have to supplement for warmth?

30 miles is a bit ambitious for three days. I'd think more in the 20 mile range is better. We're going on a scout backpacking trip in a couple of weeks, and we are planning 17 miles/two nights.

HooKooDooKu
03-03-2014, 17:54
OK OP here, I want the kid to enjoy the trip. I was checking out ebay looking at used bags. Seems like alot of folks use them a few times only to sell them and looks like some good deals to be had. I, however don't know crap about good sleeping bags for hiking.
If you were gonna spend $90-$100 or so on a ebay bag, which would you pick?

I saw a mountain hardwear womens bag that looked good. Orange and black so the colors are fine.

Two things to keep in mind:
For a given temperature rating, the lighter the bag, the more expensive it will be.
For a given given model line, the lower the temperature rating, the heavier the bag.

As a gross approximation, it seems to me that a decent quality bag is going to start at around $150 (full retail). Anything cheaper is usually going to either be a cheap bag, or it's going to be fairly heavy for what you get.

Example:
For about $150, you should be able to get a 15-20 bag that weights about 4lbs or a 32 bag that weights 3lbs.
For about $275, you should be able to get a 15-20 bag that weights about 3lbs or a 32 bag that weights 2lbs.
For about $400, you should be able to get a 15-20 bag that weights about 2lbs

Of course these are retail prices. Used bags and bags at clearance prices will be cheaper. As a great example, I got a pair of 32 2lb bags for me and my son last year that retail for about $275 that I was able to pick up at a clearance price of about $150 each. A few weeks ago, I was able to buy a 15 3lb bag for me that retails for about $275 that I was able to pick up at a clearance price of about $125.

As for me personally, I'm not into purchasing equipment someone has been sleeping in... there's just too many brand new bags I can find at clearance prices if I'm willing to take the time to search and wait.

HooKooDooKu
03-03-2014, 18:00
30 miles is a bit ambitious for three days. I'd think more in the 20 mile range is better. We're going on a scout backpacking trip in a couple of weeks, and we are planning 17 miles/two nights.
The rule of thumb I read years ago about children is that you can expect them to do about 1 mile per day per year in age.

But the even better suggestion is to try a few long day hikes (5+ miles) and simply see how they do.

My 11yo has run into issues doing hikes much longer than 7 or 8 miles, while his 7yo brother recently did 20 miles in 2 days.

OCDave
03-03-2014, 18:58
loners4me,

No offense intended to HooKooDooKu but, I would suggest ignoring any rule of thumb regarding pre-teens and hiking or backpacking or "insert any activity here". There is just way too much variability regarding physical ability, coordination, motivation ect. You will have to find your child's capabilities and limitations through trial and error.

Do you know anyone from who you might borrow a pad and sleeping bag for your son? It would be a reasonable option.


Again, Good Luck.

FarmerChef
03-03-2014, 19:07
The rule of thumb I read years ago about children is that you can expect them to do about 1 mile per day per year in age.

But the even better suggestion is to try a few long day hikes (5+ miles) and simply see how they do.

My 11yo has run into issues doing hikes much longer than 7 or 8 miles, while his 7yo brother recently did 20 miles in 2 days.

This.

At 5 year's old I took my son on day hikes of gradually increasing mileage. He finally pooped out at 26 miles then perked up and went running afterward. As he was the smallest of the hiking kids we dialed in our daily mileage on him. That has worked for us over the years. Each person and each kid are different. The best way to find out what is comfortable and enjoyable is to go try it. On the hike you and he can work together to decide to go further/shorter depending on how you/he feel.

HooKooDooKu
03-03-2014, 19:22
No offense intended to HooKooDooKu but, I would suggest ignoring any rule of thumb regarding pre-teens and hiking or backpacking or "insert any activity here". There is just way too much variability regarding physical ability, coordination, motivation ect. You will have to find your child's capabilities and limitations through trial and error.
Apparently you skipped over the part where I said "try a few long day hikes" and my examples of my sons...

besides... a "rule-of-thumb (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_of_thumb)" is what it is...
"a principle with broad application that is not intended to be strictly accurate or reliable for every situation." (Wikipedia) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_of_thumb)
In other words, when you don't know where else to start, start with the rule-of-thumb.

OCDave
03-03-2014, 22:47
Apparently you skipped over the part where I said "try a few long day hikes" and my examples of my sons...

besides... a "rule-of-thumb (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_of_thumb)" is what it is...
"a principle with broad application that is not intended to be strictly accurate or reliable for every situation." (Wikipedia) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_of_thumb)
In other words, when you don't know where else to start, start with the rule-of-thumb.

As I said: No offense intended