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ALLEGHENY
03-05-2014, 14:55
Which of the fourteen states along the AT corridor has the lowest property tax? I live in PA and would like to move someplace to retire and hike my senior years.http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/images/icons/icon7.png

Jeff
03-05-2014, 15:01
For sure NOT Vermont.

Lone Wolf
03-05-2014, 15:04
Which of the fourteen states along the AT corridor has the lowest property tax? I live in PA and would like to move someplace to retire and hike my senior years.http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/images/icons/icon7.png
west virginia
http://taxes.about.com/od/statetaxes/a/property-taxes-best-and-worst-states.htm

ALLEGHENY
03-05-2014, 15:05
For sure NOT Vermont.
That's two scratched off. Twelve to go.

moose717
03-05-2014, 15:09
Definitely NOT NJ!

ALLEGHENY
03-05-2014, 15:11
Thanks LW.

Mags
03-05-2014, 15:11
Don't know if it is the lowest property tax overall, but my Dad went from the highly taxed state of Rhode Island (http://www.forbes.com/pictures/eehd45eejif/10th-worst-state-rhode-island/) to the consistently rated high North Carolina. Virginia was rated high (http://www.forbes.com/pictures/eehd45eejif/5th-best-state-virgina/). In that Forbes article I linked, other AT northeast states are also rated terrible for retirement (New York, Maine, Mass, Maryland, PA).

Basically, north of the Mason-Dixon line seems terrible for retirement. :) South? Not so much. (Many northeast transplants in North Carolina now it seems!)

colorado_rob
03-05-2014, 15:20
Well, sorry for the drift and not answering your specific question, but forget the east coast and come on out to God's Country, Colorado, where taxes are very low. My 2500 sq. ft. house has $2100/year property taxes. 3.5% state sales tax (some counties and city's have more; I pay 4.5% in my Denver suburb). 4.6% income tax. I'm sure there are even cheaper states out west, but I'm happy as a lark for my retirement income tax burden.

Old Grouse
03-05-2014, 15:29
Forget Connecticut, too. Take a look at New Hampshire & try to find a town there with few or no services, hence less need to tax.

Mags
03-05-2014, 15:31
In that Forbes article, Arizona, Colorado and Utah were all rated high, too.

Obviously, Forbes may have a different criteria than others for what is "best", but shows how the Northeast is just expensive, highly taxed and not the best place for a retirement income! :)

FWIW, Dad is enjoying North Carolina.

TEXMAN
03-05-2014, 15:33
I had a cottage in Maine that I sold last year >>> it sold for $130,000 an my property taxes were $900 a year ..that's pretty low ...
also I just read in one of the financial mags that Bangor was listed as one of the best places to live on a retirement budget (but it is a long winter)

WingedMonkey
03-05-2014, 15:34
South? Not so much. (Many northeast transplants in North Carolina now it seems!)

We call them Half-backs. They move to Florida, can't deal with all the other northerners that moved to Florida, so they move half way back north. To North Carolina.

:sun

youngr
03-05-2014, 15:39
I could suggest South Carolina. It is not ALONG the trail but within decent distance of the AT as well as many others.

Don H
03-05-2014, 15:40
Well don't buy in Maryland, they even tax the rain here!

My guess would be WV and TN.

Coffee
03-05-2014, 15:45
I've looked at Front Royal property before and if I recall correctly the property tax in Warren County VA was around 1% of market value but it would be good to recheck since I looked at it a few years ago.

FarmerChef
03-05-2014, 15:50
Don't know if it is the lowest property tax overall, but my Dad went from the highly taxed state of Rhode Island (http://www.forbes.com/pictures/eehd45eejif/10th-worst-state-rhode-island/) to the consistently rated high North Carolina. Virginia was rated high (http://www.forbes.com/pictures/eehd45eejif/5th-best-state-virgina/). In that Forbes article I linked, other AT northeast states are also rated terrible for retirement (New York, Maine, Mass, Maryland, PA).

Basically, north of the Mason-Dixon line seems terrible for retirement. :) South? Not so much. (Many northeast transplants in North Carolina now it seems!)

Can't comment on Virginia property taxes as compared to elsewhere but in the Forbes article Mags quotes we ranked 5th BEST state to retire in :D

mainebob
03-05-2014, 15:51
Not Maine, we have one of the highest tax burdens in the country and work is hard to find. I love Maine, but when we retire we will have to move out of state.

ALLEGHENY
03-05-2014, 15:51
Thanks everyone. WV, NC and VA look ok. Thought that others have wanted to know.

Grey Ghost
03-05-2014, 15:54
How about Tennessee? Wonder how much it is there.

mak1277
03-05-2014, 15:54
west virginia
http://taxes.about.com/od/statetaxes/a/property-taxes-best-and-worst-states.htm


If I liked to hike (and I do), and I looked at this list, I wouldn't be able to see anything besides "Wyoming" as the logical answer.

Lone Wolf
03-05-2014, 15:55
i pay $800 property tax in Damascus. and that's town and county

Don H
03-05-2014, 15:58
This article rates TN #1 for the best retirement state.

http://www.bankrate.com/finance/retirement/best-states-for-retirement.aspx#slide=11

If I could escape the tax and spend state of MD this is where I would go, eastern TN.

Pedaling Fool
03-05-2014, 16:20
Good timing on this thread, because I just read this, this morning. It's just one more thing to consider, since this is about states to retire in.

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/the-most-expensive-places-to-die-2014-03-04

Excerpt:

"With the current relatively generous federal estate tax exemption of $5.25 million for 2013 and $5.34 million for 2014, you surely donít have any estate tax worries. Right? Not necessarily! It turns out that 19 states and the District of Columbia impose their own estate and/or inheritance taxes (http://www.marketwatch.com/taxes?lc=int_mb_1001), and most of them have exemptions well below the federal amount. If you live in one of these places, your estate might be exempt from the federal estate tax but still exposed to a significant state death tax hit. Yikes! Hereís what you need to know.

14 states and D.C. have their own estate taxes"

fredmugs
03-05-2014, 16:47
You have to factor in a lot more than property taxes to make that call. Some states like Tennessee do not have a personal income tax. Your income source / stream, retirement savings, etc are going to be a large factor. The lowest tax states to retire to are Wyoming (the states makes a lot from leasing natural resources) and Nevada (gambling revenue).

http://www.kiplinger.com/tool/retirement/T055-S001-state-by-state-guide-to-taxes-on-retirees/

Slo-go'en
03-05-2014, 16:55
Well then, you don't want to move to NH, but on the other hand we have no sales or income tax (yet) Of course, it all depend on exactly where you live as the tax rate can vary significantly between towns.

magic_game03
03-05-2014, 17:08
I'd say the next time you hike the AT just stop and count the teeth of the locals. Which ever state has the least number of teeth on average is the place your lookin for. Probably WV, TN, or GA.

P.S. I hear oatmeal in bulk is cheap, you'll save double! :)

ALLEGHENY
03-05-2014, 17:12
You have to factor in a lot more than property taxes to make that call. Some states like Tennessee do not have a personal income tax. Your income source / stream, retirement savings, etc are going to be a large factor. The lowest tax states to retire to are Wyoming (the states makes a lot from leasing natural resources) and Nevada (gambling revenue).

http://www.kiplinger.com/tool/retirement/T055-S001-state-by-state-guide-to-taxes-on-retirees/


PA doesn't look so bad now. I think I will evaluate each county on the property tax.

daddytwosticks
03-05-2014, 17:12
NC property taxes vary county by county. The far western counties are pretty low. However, NC will get you in other ways wrt taxes compared to most other southern states like Georgia or Florida. :)

The Solemates
03-05-2014, 17:18
I've lived in several states along the AT. TN is the best IMO. No income tax, for one. And property taxes are low as well, especially if you live in the county but not within city limits. I dont live in East TN along the AT, but my county taxes are low.

10-K
03-05-2014, 17:43
Georgia would be the cheapest AT state. If you're retired (as in not working) income tax isn't an issue. Georgia doesn't tax the first $35k-$65k of retirement income, depending on your age and that includes interest and dividends as well as social security.

Tennessee taxes interests and dividends over $2500 regardless of age and we have an ungodly sales tax of almost 10%.

North Carolina taxes all interest and dividends.

There are several nuances to the above but definitely Georgia is the most favorable state on the AT as far as stretching money in retirement.

CarlZ993
03-05-2014, 17:50
I wouldn't look solely @ property taxes. Look at your total projected tax burden (property tax, income tax, sales tax rate, vehicle registrations fees, etc) based on your projected income & property value.

Use these figures for several places you are considering. Let that factor into your decision. I wouldn't make taxes the sole consideration for a retirement move.

Regardless, I hope you find someplace you like & fits your criteria.

HikerMom58
03-05-2014, 17:50
Thanks everyone. WV, NC and VA look ok. Thought that others have wanted to know.

I think you should consider VA.. :)

gypsy97
03-05-2014, 17:50
And then they move into gated communities in NC so they don't have to be near the local riff-raff.

brian039
03-05-2014, 17:56
If you haven't done any western US hiking I strongly encourage you to give that a shot before deciding on the AT corridor. I know everyone's tastes are different but I really don't see how anyone would prefer the AT to anything the west has to offer.

bamboo bob
03-05-2014, 18:17
For sure NOT Vermont.

You got that right.

peakbagger
03-05-2014, 18:17
NH has high local property taxes but it varies significantly between towns. NH also has a very generous current use exemption if you want to own some property over 10 acres.
Taxes are raised and spent locally so you need to pick a town with few kids and lots of summer places. Randolph NH is one of them although the house values can be high if you want the "VIEW", the trade off is zero services except what they can negotiate with the town next door. If your house is on fire, it will be a heap of ashes long before someone shows up and if your house is broken into the state police may stop by eventually. Its also a dry town with a gas station and that is about it. You also had better like winter hiking :). Of course the town is criss crossed with hiking trails and you can walk from your house to the northern Presidential and the longest stretch of above treeline on the AT.

bamboo bob
03-05-2014, 18:20
Forget Connecticut, too. Take a look at New Hampshire & try to find a town there with few or no services, hence less need to tax.

NH property taxi is higher than VT becaus ethey have no income tax and no sales tax. They have a view tax!

bamboo bob
03-05-2014, 18:22
You have to factor in a lot more than property taxes to make that call. Some states like Tennessee do not have a personal income tax. Your income source / stream, retirement savings, etc are going to be a large factor. The lowest tax states to retire to are Wyoming (the states makes a lot from leasing natural resources) and Nevada (gambling revenue).

http://www.kiplinger.com/tool/retirement/T055-S001-state-by-state-guide-to-taxes-on-retirees/

Dude, the guy wants to move to a state ALONG the AT. Not WY or CO

bamboo bob
03-05-2014, 18:26
VT ain't cheap but it is beautiful and civilizes and has a huge number of great brew pubs and beer ! So it's worth it.

wtrenda
03-05-2014, 18:26
I just briefly looked at a county-by-county map and it looks like the lowest property taxes are here in East TN. As mentioned before, there is also no income tax but high sales tax...AND we are even in the process of allowing people to buy wine in grocery stores!!!(big times here in TN)

Also just glanced at a spreadsheet about Total State and Local Tax Burden w/ data taken from 1977-2010. TN is ranked 3rd lowest overall tax burden with only South Dakota and Alaska having a lower burden.

http://taxfoundation.org/article/state-and-local-tax-burdens-all-states-one-year-1977-2010

With that said, I just really enjoy the East TN area...it's close to any trails in NC and VA(unless you're down close to Chattanooga) and has a good variety of trails.

takethisbread
03-05-2014, 18:27
I'm retiring to Washington State. no income tax, moderate weather. I would consider California if the taxes weren't horrible, and the economy is in the tank, and home prices are out of control


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bamboo bob
03-05-2014, 18:34
Is Washington State on the AT now?

mak1277
03-05-2014, 18:39
If you haven't done any western US hiking I strongly encourage you to give that a shot before deciding on the AT corridor. I know everyone's tastes are different but I really don't see how anyone would prefer the AT to anything the west has to offer.

This, without a doubt.

Damn Yankee
03-05-2014, 18:44
Certainly NOT Taxachusetts but, I love NH Motto..Live Free or Die. That would be my pick just because I love the motto. I moved to VA from RI but born and raised in MA. beautiful state just high taxes. I know here in the city of Staunton taxes are high compared to the county but, it is a beautiful town. My mom moved to Georgia and seems to like it and got a great house for $32,000

Jeff
03-05-2014, 18:49
Keep in mind the cost of heating your home. This winter's fuel oil bill is through the roof. However, my down sleeping bag gets plenty of use with the thermostat set pretty low.:)

ALLEGHENY
03-05-2014, 19:25
Thanks WB. States that tax retirement income is what I'm going to steer clear of. I worked too long and hard for my pension.

colorado_rob
03-05-2014, 19:31
Is Washington State on the AT now? Yeah, well we heard ya a couple times already, but us westerners are trying to steer the OP west. Let us ramble. We're not hurtin' nuthin.

ALLEGHENY
03-05-2014, 19:34
I would go west but I'm not a young man.

bamboo bob
03-05-2014, 19:49
Okay, Hijacked it is.

I've done the PCT and a fair chunk of the CDT and the AT. I don't see the need to say one trail is better than the other. Or that the Western Trails or Eastern Trails (of which their is more than the AT) are better than the other ones.

They are different is all and they all are terrific in their ways. Some have better views, some have better forests. Some are green and some are brown. Some have more water and easier hitching and some have better beer.

It's like saying which of your kids do you love more.

10-K
03-05-2014, 20:02
If you decide to move to NC I've got 12 acres for sale 3 miles from the AT crossing at Devil's Fork Gap. The views from the property are amazing..

https://picasaweb.google.com/tbradnc/TripWithAutumnNov12007#5128306937526195522

ALLEGHENY
03-05-2014, 20:17
If you decide to move to NC I've got 12 acres for sale 3 miles from the AT crossing at Devil's Fork Gap. The views from the property are amazing..

https://picasaweb.google.com/tbradnc/TripWithAutumnNov12007#5128306937526195522

That seems nice. $/acre, any restrictions?

10-K
03-05-2014, 20:47
Paid $130k for it at the height of the real estate bubble - would take $90k for it and would consider financing if we could work out terms that we both liked. Taxes run around $350 year

I had it perk tested, there's a large creek running down one side of the property and a seasonal spring. Power could be pulled from a couple of directions. My plan was to tie into the line and run power underground to avoid stringing line and interfering with the views.

I also put 5 loads of gravel on the drive and built a very nice 12x14 cabin (small, but very well built - insulated, real door and double pane windows, metal roof, deck, etc. Cost about $8k to build)

The property is shaped like a rectangular frying pan. The handle is about .25 miles long and opens up into 6.5 acre level - to slightly sloping open field perfect for building. The remaining 5.5 acres is half a mountain... Long ago it was a Christmas tree farm we think. It's one of those places you'd never in a million years would imagine would be tucked away where it is. Driving by you'd never imagine what was at the end of that .25 mile driveway.

No restrictions. You could build a mansion, haul in a singlewide or string up some teepees, go off the grid, and start a weed farm. :)

ALLEGHENY
03-05-2014, 21:02
Someone will buy it. I have a year or two and would need to sell my home here first.

10-K
03-05-2014, 21:07
Someone will buy it. I have a year or two and would need to sell my home here first.

Good luck! I retired in January and am enjoying it so far. It's pretty amazing not to have to go to work.

imscotty
03-05-2014, 21:15
Property taxes in NH are generally sky high - but there are exceptions. Check out Randolph, NH, a great rural town, extensive Randolph Mountain Club trails, reasonable property taxes.

Venchka
03-05-2014, 22:10
The scuttlebut in Boone, NC is that TN, a few miles west, is cheaper. Lower cost real estate (after you get out of the mountains and away from Gatlinburg), zero state income tax, reasonable property tax. Johnson City-Elizabethton looks interesting: Universaty, hospitals, etc.. We may poke around some next year. We would like to be closer to our family in Boone. In the meantime, Texas is too good to give up.
Hickory-Lenoir-Morganton, NC also look promising. Down mountain, away from big bucks real estate prices but only about 90 minutes from the mountains. Unless the FOG is draining down mountain from Boone & Blowing Rock.
Good luck!

Wayne

Slo-go'en
03-05-2014, 22:27
Property taxes in NH are generally sky high - but there are exceptions. Check out Randolph, NH, a great rural town, extensive Randolph Mountain Club trails, reasonable property taxes.

I already bought the least expensive cottage in Randolph and should have offered a lot less had I known all the issues I had to fix - like all the sills rotted out so there wasn't anything holding up the walls! Everything else for sale right now is priced very optimistically and some of the houses are way up there in price. OTOH, Berlin has some real bargins, but mostly serious fixer uppers and the tax rate is pretty high (since most of the property isn't worth much).

4eyedbuzzard
03-06-2014, 04:08
I already bought the least expensive cottage in Randolph and should have offered a lot less had I known all the issues I had to fix - like all the sills rotted out so there wasn't anything holding up the walls! Everything else for sale right now is priced very optimistically and some of the houses are way up there in price. OTOH, Berlin has some real bargins, but mostly serious fixer uppers and the tax rate is pretty high (since most of the property isn't worth much).Add that Berlin is a very depressed town (looks like a $#!^hole) due to all the paper mill closings which led to abandoned homes and store closings. There's just very little upside for the Berlin area near-term, and this unfortunately spills over into Gorham. The downsized and reopened Gorham paper mill is laying off again, and the owner (Lynn Tilton, the "diva of distressed") is a bit of a nut with a history of either turning companies around or closing them down and selling off the remnants. If you want to move to the north country of NH I would look more at Conway (touristy moderately upscale) and Bartlett area on the east side and to the west towards Jefferson, Whitefield, Twin Mountain/Carroll, Littleton (a busy and growing little town and the hub of the north country's west side), Franconia (touristy), Sugar Hill (upscale), Lincoln/Woodstock(touristy moderately upscale), Warren, Pike, Lyme, Canaan, and others to the west, and if you want bigger town amenities, over toward Hanover/Lebanon. You get what you pay for. The more a town has to offer, generally the higher the price and taxes.

4eyedbuzzard
03-06-2014, 04:21
I'm looking at retiring in about 5 years, but after considering everything, I think taxes, while an important consideration, shouldn't be the deciding factor in choosing where to live. Places with no income and/or sales tax usually have higher property taxes. And vice-versa. Things do have to get paid for. But this assumes one is looking at lower tax rural and/or affordable areas to begin with. Where ever you choose to retire, you really should pick it because you really want to be there and it offers you what you want and need - not because of tax structure.

Mrs Baggins
03-06-2014, 05:52
You do realize that PA does not tax any retirement source of income (pensions, retired military, 401K, etc)? No other state that I know of along the AT does that. So if you have any of that, you're going to trade possibly lower property taxes for higher income taxes? We're considering PA for retirement just for that reason. All of hubby's retirement income will be from the non-taxed sources. We can get more property there for a LOT less money and thereby have lower property taxes than we do now. We've heard the "OMG, PA property taxes are so high!" Not compared to what we are paying now they aren't. We live in Maryland.

takethisbread
03-06-2014, 07:14
You do realize that PA does not tax any retirement source of income (pensions, retired military, 401K, etc)? No other state that I know of along the AT does that. So if you have any of that, you're going to trade possibly lower property taxes for higher income taxes? We're considering PA for retirement just for that reason. All of hubby's retirement income will be from the non-taxed sources. We can get more property there for a LOT less money and thereby have lower property taxes than we do now. We've heard the "OMG, PA property taxes are so high!" Not compared to what we are paying now they aren't. We live in Maryland.
Duncannon was always an ideal retirement spot in my mind:)


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Don H
03-06-2014, 07:37
In PA it's the local school taxes that can get you.

perrymk
03-06-2014, 07:41
As I'm about 6 1/2 years from retirement (with a little luck) I spend probably too much time looking at cost of living vs lifestyle vs services. One thing is certain, governments need money to provide services. The idea is to go to places that either have natural resources to pay them or to go to places that only have services to pay for that interest you.

Although not exactly what you asked for, one can hike from Alabama along the Pinhoti and I believe one other trail and access the AT. When I lived in Alabama in the early 90s the joke was one could double the property tax and still have the lowest in the country. There is a state income tax but certain incomes are exempt, such as gov't pensions.

Georgia has been mentioned. Something else to ask about their tax structure are senior exemptions. I seem to recall that seniors qualify for certain property tax exemptions as well as income tax exemptions. Income limits may apply but if one exceeds the limit then cost of living may not be your biggest concern anyway.

An extreme example is Alaska. Outside of city limits there are no property taxes and Alaska has no state income tax. The downside is outside of city limits you are pretty much on your own. No fire service, often no police service (they are too far away to be of practical emergency benefit), little chance of getting homeowners insurance (no one insures a house with a fire place and no fire department) plus you will pay extra high gas price for the all-wheel drive vehicle you need to go anywhere.

I hope you'll share what info you come up with as it really is of interest to me. Right now I am in Florida but not the Florida most people think of when they think Florida. It's more like rural Georgia but with wimpy hills. No state tax, good homestead exemption on property tax, and in my area a not bad cost of living.

4eyedbuzzard
03-06-2014, 07:45
In PA it's the local school taxes that can get you.Same in NH. If you live in a small town the school budget can eat you alive. One, teachers salaries and the number of mandated "specialists" keeps going up every year by close to 6%. Then all it takes is for one very expensive to educate student to move in and the town is on the hook for the costs, given that the state sped emergency/contingency funding is overwhelmed and underfunded. We had one instance in our small town to the tune of @$250K per year. It wasn't fun trying to explain mandated spending at that town meeting.

Old Grouse
03-06-2014, 07:56
There are other considerations. As we age it's helpful to have good medical care within a reasonable distance (sigh).

daddytwosticks
03-06-2014, 08:10
I think it's pretty obvious: stay below the Mason-Dixon line with regards to taxes. Total cost of living and climate would probably win out also. :)

pipsissewa
03-06-2014, 08:14
This is a very interesting subject, and very complex. We've tried to analyze the same issues before. One problem with the Forbes article is valuation. If two states have have very different taxes rates expressed as a percentage of the property value--say .5 percent and 1.5 percent--the winner seems obvious. However, consider this: identical properties in two states with the same tax rate--say a 1500 square foot house on 4 acres outside of town--may be valued at $150,000 in one state and $400,000 in the other state! There is also a city component to property tax, so in-town will differ from in the county. So, nearly impossible to analyze.

Also, with regard to income tax, maybe Pennsylvania exempts retirement income from income tax. NC exempts SOME retirement income (although that exemption is changing--retired state and federal government employees will fair best). Retirement income may not be that high and you'll be in a lower tax bracket. Again, hard to pin down exact figures.

SALES TAX is critical to look at too. You'll always be buying stuff. Tennessee sales tax can be as much as 9.75%. Sales tax as well as property tax usually have a county and sometimes even a city component. Again, almost impossible to calculate.

As mentioned above, some states have homestead exemptions. NC does not.

So, you see, it gets extremely complicated. The analysis is dependent on your situation. If you're going to be living on a fixed income and want to cash in your lifetime residence to buy a gentlemen's farm, the analysis will be completely different than if you have a real good retirement income and want to downsize to a maintenance-free two bedroom condo (so you can hike more!!!)

Thanks for bringing up this subject and thanks to all the members for their responses. I am continuing to read this thread with great interest.

10-K
03-06-2014, 08:16
The OP asked which state that the AT runs through has the lowest taxes, implying that he meant lowest taxes for someone retired and not working.

The "ding-ding-ding" answer to his question is Georgia.

But like 4EB said above, that alone is just one metric for deciding where to retire. But, you have to start asking direct questions when you retire and start getting direct answers.

So the first question may be: "I want to live in a state the AT runs through. Which one has the lowest taxes?"

Answer: Georgia

And on to the next criteria, the next, and so on and then, once you have all your information compile it and based on several things, of which taxes are only a part, decide where to retire.

Here are 10,100,000 results for the Google search, "most tax friendly states for retirement". https://www.google.com/search?q=most+tax+friendly+states+for+retirement&oq=most+&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j69i59j69i61l3j0.1744j0j4&sourceid=chrome&espv=210&es_sm=119&ie=UTF-8

Edited to add: I wouldn't let the tax tail wag the dog when deciding where to retire.

ALLEGHENY
03-06-2014, 13:30
Thanks again everyone.

Venchka
03-06-2014, 13:40
RE: Senior's property taxes. Do any of the AT proximity states offer Seniors (65+) any breaks on their property taxes?
Here in Texas most local taxing authorities grant Seniors an additional amount on their homestead exemption. In addition to that, property taxes are capped at the amount levied in the year you turn 65. In the event taxes decline, Seniors pay the lower amount, but never exceed the capped amount.
Something to look at.
As for states that don't tax retirement income, all states with no state income tax will not tax your retirement income. Or any other money you earn for that matter.
Look at the whole picture.

Wayne

Drybones
03-06-2014, 13:59
If you work, live in TN near the border, they have no income tax but a fairly high sales tax. I lived in Portand, TN, about 4 miles from KY which had a low sales tax, which is where we shopped...you get the best of both. The property tax in NY was 14 times higher than what I paid in MS.

Alligator
03-06-2014, 14:13
Since you have gotten a bit of information on the states it passes through, there is also the Great Eastern Trail. This would add in Alabama, Kentucky, and significantly more of West Virginia to places you might consider.

Teacher & Snacktime
03-06-2014, 14:17
I think you should consider VA.. :)

HikerMom wants us ALL to move to Roanoke! Snacktime is willing!

4eyedbuzzard
03-06-2014, 14:18
I wouldn't let the tax tail wag the dog when deciding where to retire.Yeah, I think there are greater concerns. Taxes are just part of the cost of living equation. But even that doesn't take into account geographic preference, family, climate, etc. There are just so many factors to balance. The number one to me is, where am I going to be happiest?

ALLEGHENY
03-06-2014, 14:40
Yeah, I think there are greater concerns. Taxes are just part of the cost of living equation. But even that doesn't take into account geographic preference, family, climate, etc. There are just so many factors to balance. The number one to me is, where am I going to be happiest?


I can see more of the picture now.
thanks!

Mags
03-06-2014, 16:10
I think it's pretty obvious: stay below the Mason-Dixon line with regards to taxes. Total cost of living and climate would probably win out also. :)


Again, that was my Dad's strategy. Quite frankly, he lives in a less-than-spectacular place in NC (not near the ocean, not near the mountains). Keeps it less $$$$. But, they do have excellent health services apparently as the university has a medical school.

When New England was getting slammed with snow, he half-kiddingly lamented the 1-2" he rec'd! :)

I still say, at least back East, seems like anything north of the Mason-Dixon line is not the most friendly place to retire.

In my Dad's case, his house is both nicer and less $$$ than the house in RI. Utilities and food are less. Infrastructure is in better shape. Taxes are less.

( Yeah..I'm just shy of 40. But it is on my mind more lately.....)

daddytwosticks
03-06-2014, 16:23
This is a very interesting subject, and very complex. We've tried to analyze the same issues before. One problem with the Forbes article is valuation. If two states have have very different taxes rates expressed as a percentage of the property value--say .5 percent and 1.5 percent--the winner seems obvious. However, consider this: identical properties in two states with the same tax rate--say a 1500 square foot house on 4 acres outside of town--may be valued at $150,000 in one state and $400,000 in the other state! There is also a city component to property tax, so in-town will differ from in the county. So, nearly impossible to analyze.

Also, with regard to income tax, maybe Pennsylvania exempts retirement income from income tax. NC exempts SOME retirement income (although that exemption is changing--retired state and federal government employees will fair best). Retirement income may not be that high and you'll be in a lower tax bracket. Again, hard to pin down exact figures.

SALES TAX is critical to look at too. You'll always be buying stuff. Tennessee sales tax can be as much as 9.75%. Sales tax as well as property tax usually have a county and sometimes even a city component. Again, almost impossible to calculate.

As mentioned above, some states have homestead exemptions. NC does not.

So, you see, it gets extremely complicated. The analysis is dependent on your situation. If you're going to be living on a fixed income and want to cash in your lifetime residence to buy a gentlemen's farm, the analysis will be completely different than if you have a real good retirement income and want to downsize to a maintenance-free two bedroom condo (so you can hike more!!!)

Thanks for bringing up this subject and thanks to all the members for their responses. I am continuing to read this thread with great interest.

NC DOES have a Homestead Exemption for county property taxes. However, you must be over the age of 65 or totally and permanently disabled AND have a yearly income less than $28,600. In addition, if you are a totally disabled veteran, you can get a county property tax break also, no age or income restrictions. :)

pipsissewa
03-06-2014, 16:51
That's right. I forgot about that.

Drybones
03-06-2014, 18:01
HikerMom wants us ALL to move to Roanoke! Snacktime is willing!

If you like the outdoors Roanoke would be tough to beat, lived there five years and loved it, wish I'd been a hiker then. They have the New River south of town (fantastic floats and fishing), James River north of town, Appalachian Trail one side and Blue Ridge Parkway the other, two huge National forests nearby, Washington and Jefferson, with great hunting or whatever you do in the woods. Dont know about now but back then it was a fairly large city with a small town atmosphere...great people there. Was nice having the airport and shopping five minutes away also.

gpburdelljr
03-06-2014, 18:10
http://www.kiplinger.com/tool/retirement/T055-S001-state-by-state-guide-to-taxes-on-retirees/

darkbyrd
03-07-2014, 01:58
We call them Half-backs. They move to Florida, can't deal with all the other northerners that moved to Florida, so they move half way back north. To North Carolina.

:sun

Yeah, we're getting ate up with the halfbacks

daddytwosticks
03-07-2014, 08:13
If you like the outdoors Roanoke would be tough to beat, lived there five years and loved it, wish I'd been a hiker then. They have the New River south of town (fantastic floats and fishing), James River north of town, Appalachian Trail one side and Blue Ridge Parkway the other, two huge National forests nearby, Washington and Jefferson, with great hunting or whatever you do in the woods. Dont know about now but back then it was a fairly large city with a small town atmosphere...great people there. Was nice having the airport and shopping five minutes away also.Sounds like Asheville, NC without the hippies. Not that there's anything wrong with that. :)

Mags
03-07-2014, 09:13
Ha! I spoke to my Mom yesterday. She and her husband are moving to Sarasota, FL. Less taxes, better weather, less $$$$ overall.

Too funny.

Lemni Skate
03-07-2014, 09:28
I would definitely expect a cheap cost of living and taxes in SW Virginia

BradMT
03-07-2014, 17:59
Not Maine, we have one of the highest tax burdens in the country and work is hard to find. I love Maine, but when we retire we will have to move out of state.

Ther are many, many staes with a worse tax burden than Maine.

BradMT
03-07-2014, 18:15
I'd say the next time you hike the AT just stop and count the teeth of the locals. Which ever state has the least number of teeth on average is the place your lookin for. Probably WV, TN, or GA.

P.S. I hear oatmeal in bulk is cheap, you'll save double! :)

LOL. best post on the thread!

BradMT
03-07-2014, 18:59
this, without a doubt.


x2................

jmitchell
03-08-2014, 11:38
In PA, taxes are highly dependent on which school district and municipality you live in. My taxes are very reasonable for the property I own, and lower than others quoted on this thread. PA also has a fairly low income tax. Home prices are reasonable. It all depends on where you live in the state. Some places in PA have high taxes, others just the opposite. Overall, I like it here. Tons of parks, trails, public land; best of all, in 6 hours I can be in Maine, ADKs, or southern/central Virginia. There is good to be found wherever you live.

Drybones
03-08-2014, 11:42
I'm patting myself on the back, after looking at this thread several times I still have not gone on a rant about taxes and gotten myself into trouble.

Alligator
03-08-2014, 12:19
I'm patting myself on the back, after looking at this thread several times I still have not gone on a rant about taxes and gotten myself into trouble.Good job, Thank you.

The thread has been remarkably well restrained. For just the couple of recent posters who have not, please keep the politics out of it.

ALLEGHENY
03-08-2014, 13:00
A year and a half after hiking the trail my mind keeps going back to it. I started thinking about moving closer to it and posted this question.
From the responses, I see that I have it good here in PA. The school tax is the bigger concern and my county tax is lower with a homestead and senior exclusions. I'll look to down size to the middle of PA and look for other less expensive communities. But then again GA has a longer growing season for my garden and has a lower living cost.
I didn't want to start any trouble here.

Drybones
03-08-2014, 15:42
Good job, Thank you.

The thread has been remarkably well restrained. For just the couple of recent posters who have not, please keep the politics out of it.

I could feel those beady eyes lurking from the deep, watching and wait for the chance to pounce...that's why I stayed away from the waters edge.

Sarcasm the elf
03-08-2014, 16:00
A year and a half after hiking the trail my mind keeps going back to it. I started thinking about moving closer to it and posted this question.
From the responses, I see that I have it good here in PA. The school tax is the bigger concern and my county tax is lower with a homestead and senior exclusions. I'll look to down size to the middle of PA and look for other less expensive communities. But then again GA has a longer growing season for my garden and has a lower living cost.
I didn't want to start any trouble here.

For what it's worth, one of my best friends spent a good amount of time looking into what state would be best for his intention to homestead. He looked at a lot of things including taxes, growing season, cost of living, hunting and gun laws, and local zoning laws as well as the general attitude of the locals. In the end he decided on Georgia, he moved there four years ago and he hasn't regreted the decision for a moment.

mainebob
03-08-2014, 20:55
Ther are many, many staes with a worse tax burden than Maine.

fyi-
Top Five States with Highest State Tax Burden
(as a percentage of income)

∑ Maine 13.5%
∑ New York 12.9
∑ Ohio 10.0
∑ Minnesota 11.9
∑ Hawaii 11.7

United States average is 10.6%

jmitchell
03-08-2014, 21:22
A year and a half after hiking the trail my mind keeps going back to it. I started thinking about moving closer to it and posted this question.
From the responses, I see that I have it good here in PA. The school tax is the bigger concern and my county tax is lower with a homestead and senior exclusions. I'll look to down size to the middle of PA and look for other less expensive communities. But then again GA has a longer growing season for my garden and has a lower living cost.
I didn't want to start any trouble here.

If you stay in PA, consider Fulton or Bedford Counties. The mountains and countryside are very beautiful, close to a lot of hiking (Tuscarora, Standing Stone, Mid State Trails), and the growing season isn't far behind the north GA mountains.

HikerMom58
03-09-2014, 13:37
http://www.bostonglobe.com/lifestyle/travel/2014/03/08/washout-brings-unexpected-benefits-roanoke/3xVe0q1rv6A3f2KIUnu7gI/story.html

Check out Central VA.. ROANOKE VA !! Yeehaw!! We got it ALL! ;0)

Mags
03-09-2014, 14:03
fyi-
Top Five States with Highest State Tax Burden
(as a percentage of income)

∑ Maine 13.5%
∑ New York 12.9
∑ Ohio 10.0
∑ Minnesota 11.9
∑ Hawaii 11.7

United States average is 10.6%

Unfortunately, the overall tax burden is a combo of property taxes, income tax, retirement benefits, etc

Here's one list for example (slide show free...I hate slide show for online content! :) )

http://deslide.clusterfake.net/?o=html_table&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.thefiscaltimes.com%2FMedia%2FSl ideshow%2F2014%2F01%2F28%2F10-Worst-States-Taxes-2014

No surprise, six of the top ten are in the north (sorry..Maryland is not a southern state. ;) ).

Surprisingly, NC is on the list... Maybe the retirement benefits are better/lower cost of living.

Goes to show that different metrics slice the stats differently. Do the research and see what works for you.

Ostrogoth
03-09-2014, 16:08
Hale location in NH has a tax rate of only 4.55/1,000 no income tax except dividends and no sales tax. It's about 30 minutes to MT Washington (Pinkham Notch) and ergo the AT, skiing and ice climbing in your back yard!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

double d
03-09-2014, 19:51
One form of information that is important is the poverty level of a state/county/community. A higher poverty level usually means a lot more social problems in that given area.
And a lower tax rate might indicate a lower level of services in that given area, so of course, there are a lot of variables.

SunnyWalker
03-09-2014, 23:12
Try this out Alleghany:http://taxes.about.com/od/statetaxes/a/property-taxes-best-and-worst-states.htm

perrymk
03-10-2014, 06:26
And a lower tax rate might indicate a lower level of services in that given area, so of course, there are a lot of variables.

The neighboring county from where I live has property taxes about 3 times what I pay. The most obvious difference for me is they have lots of parks. Also, their sheriff's department has a helicopter; ours doesn't but gets to borrow theirs on occasion (usually to help search for a missing child).

One will get what one pays for.

dmax
03-10-2014, 08:32
Outside of Erwin, Tn our last property tax was $440. We live in Unicoi county.

SunnyWalker
03-10-2014, 10:28
My Prop taxes this year was almost $3000.00 (three thousand dollars). Eventually we will move as we recently retired. :-?

ALLEGHENY
03-10-2014, 13:03
I have got enough food for thought.
Thank you.

Drybones
03-10-2014, 13:17
The neighboring county from where I live has property taxes about 3 times what I pay. The most obvious difference for me is they have lots of parks. Also, their sheriff's department has a helicopter; ours doesn't but gets to borrow theirs on occasion (usually to help search for a missing child).

One will get what one pays for.

@%$^ &*%$ %$#@$ (&(^% %#$# *&%%.............!!!!!

Lemni Skate
03-11-2014, 07:51
In Virginia I've lived in a lot of different localities. No correlation between tax rate and services rendered. I never can figure out what some counties do with their money.

Drybones
03-11-2014, 08:23
In Virginia I've lived in a lot of different localities. No correlation between tax rate and services rendered. I never can figure out what some counties do with their money.

Buy votes.

Smokin' Joe
03-18-2014, 00:34
I would say Georgia and Tennessee. Tennessee Also has no income tax and highly rated state in individual rights. Property is cheaper there in the mountains than NC for sure. I've heard areas in Virginia are cheaper in Real Estate lately, but I don't know about taxes? I think they're higher. WV might be lowest but just barely a trail area state. It might depend on the amenities you're looking for? The more touristy and infrastructure, the higher the taxes of course.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

imscotty
03-24-2014, 09:24
According to this article, looks like West Virginia wins the contest for AT states. Check out the 'Tax Map'...

http://www.cnbc.com/id/101504033

fiddlehead
03-24-2014, 10:36
Interesting thread.
A few thoughts:
1/ I agree the post about the lack of teeth was the funniest. I laughed pretty hard both times it was brought up

2/ If you rent, where I have my home in PA, there is no school tax. Only homeowners pay school tax. (don't know if all of PA is the same)

3rd/ And most important: I can't imagine moving my life to somewhere where I know no one, simply because it's the cheapest place to live.
Do you think there is no difference between the culture in E Tennessee vs the culture in NY? or MO vs CA?
There is a huge difference IMO.

If you want cheap, move to Nepal. Great hiking, rooms are less than a dollar a night and who cares what the taxes are (next to nothing)
Or Cambodia: Air Asia has cheap flights to many places with excellent hiking.

I retired to Thailand and love it here. The corruption is tough to deal with and the politics are always in upheaval but the beaches are nice, mountains are nearby and the religion is tough to beat (Buddhist) for the locals welcoming outsiders. And like I said, there are cheap flights to many exotic places.
(Borneo was a $100 flight last year (OW) with awesome hiking.)

I guess moving to E Tenn is quite adventurous too for a northerner from PA.
Just ranting here as it's about bedtime.

turtle fast
03-26-2014, 14:05
The timing of this thread is uncanny as my family was looking to slow down the pace of life and to take tax burdens into account with a move to a milder climate.

bamboo bob
03-26-2014, 15:10
In my town in Vermont we have very high taxes and get no Police and no Fire. If you need an EMT they are not likely to get here on time. The schools are very good although the kids graduate and leave town because there's not a lot of jobs unless you are good with a chainsaw and that's not for everyone. Property values did not really decline in the recession but they never really go up or down here. We do have a lot of music and art. If you go out all the people seem to have grey hair.



It's March 26 and spring is no where in site. We have our very own Long Trail. It's paradise.

takethisbread
03-26-2014, 15:30
In my town in Vermont we have very high taxes and get no Police and no Fire. If you need an EMT they are not likely to get here on time. The schools are very good although the kids graduate and leave town because there's not a lot of jobs unless you are good with a chainsaw and that's not for everyone. Property values did not really decline in the recession but they never really go up or down here. We do have a lot of music and art. If you go out all the people seem to have grey hair.



It's March 26 and spring is no where in site. We have our very own Long Trail. It's paradise.

what does your high tax dollars go to? no fire no police? that's usually big ticket items!



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

schultz104
03-29-2014, 20:43
try GA.
thanks
eric

Yankytyke
03-29-2014, 23:20
Which of the fourteen states along the AT corridor has the lowest property tax? I live in PA and would like to move someplace to retire and hike my senior years.http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/images/icons/icon7.png

PA does not tax pensions or retirement money. No state income tax! I see nothing wrong with that.

Rando1925
05-10-2014, 14:51
I would love to move to Damascus, VA, I am on disability but I love the small town and all the trails so close if anyone has any advice, suggestions or ideas please let me know. You can also reach me at randoleon@gmail.com

Patrickjd9
05-11-2014, 21:06
We call them Half-backs. They move to Florida, can't deal with all the other northerners that moved to Florida, so they move half way back north. To North Carolina.

:sun
Many of us also couldn't tolerate the hot climate. I'd get through a winter in interior Alaska better than I would a Florida or Texas summer.

Patrickjd9
05-11-2014, 21:09
PA does not tax pensions or retirement money. No state income tax! I see nothing wrong with that.

Many people consider Pennsylvania a very favorable retirement state, though cost of living anywhere near Philadelphia is high. What about South-central PA, near Gettysburg or Greencastle?