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View Full Version : 2+2+2 OR 3+3+3 OR 3.5+3.5+3.5 it is only $$$$



1234
03-08-2014, 10:15
Pack weight + sleeping bag weight + tent weight Is it not reasonable to say this formula is just as good for the cost? At 3.5 lbs each you will spend about $150 to $200 for each or lets say $450 to $600 total. Now for the 3lb each you will spend about $250 for each item and when you get down to the 2lb each item you will spend $300-$500 for each item of total of $900 to $1500 to get to a 6 lb 3 item weight. Of course there are are some sweet deals that can be had and they can surly save you. So you are sitting home figuring out all this stuff and you think would I spend an extra $900 dollars to save 4.5 lbs? Sitting home in front of the computer you say heck no! Now ask the question when it is to late and you are going up Sassafras Mtn. your mind thinks, OMG what was I thinking I could be 4.5 lbs lighter! By the way you carry these 3 items the whole way if thru hiking, up every mtn. across every river. My numbers may be a little bit off in terms of packs, but for sleeping bags they may be off the other way, a good sleeping bag is an easy 6 to 800 dollars!! new.

lonehiker
03-08-2014, 10:49
A good sleeping bag is half that cost.

Malto
03-08-2014, 10:55
I like my numbers better 1+1+1. And I have nowhere near the total cost in the gear that you have quoted for the differential. My quilt was $135 (unlikely that could be duplicated today), shelter about $200 (MYOG cuben) and pack was $165 (MLD Burn). Total cost $500.

RED-DOG
03-08-2014, 11:32
600 to 800 dollars for a new sleeping bag dang where have you been buying your stuff, a good 25-30 degree bag shouldn't cost more than $ 300 Synthetic is a little less and Down would be a little more, then a good 1 person tent would be around $250, A good quality pack around 200 bucks, so around $700 to $750 you should have a good quality setup that you can be proud of and do a complete thru-hike with, but you can spend alot more than this lets say you bought all cuben fiber gear that would be a little more.

Sierra2015
03-08-2014, 12:07
Western Mountaineering has lots of bags between $600 and $800: http://www.westernmountaineering.com/index.cfm?section=pricing

He's using some hyperbole, but I think we can all understand his point.

My personal goal is to have my sleeping bag, tent, and pack as close to 2 each as possible.

So far I want LHG Solong at 2 pounds (plus an ounce or so), Circuit at 2 pounds+ (exact number depends on what features I keep), a MYOG quilt that will hopefully weigh a pound, and a pad that will round everything up nicely to about 6 pounds.

My original idea and picks? Four pound bag, four pound tent, and a four pound pack! Lol

Thank God for the internet and thank the internet for you guys!

Drybones
03-08-2014, 12:19
A good sleeping bag is half that cost.

I got an REI Sub Kilo 20* bag for $100 and a Marmot Helium 15* bag for $194...both good bags.

lonehiker
03-08-2014, 12:21
Western Mountaineering has lots of bags between $600 and $800: http://www.westernmountaineering.com/index.cfm?section=pricing



At the risk of being redundant, you can get a good sleeping bag for half the price. WM isn't the only game in town.

Drybones
03-08-2014, 12:29
This what I normally use:

Sleeping bag (REI Sub Kilo) - 2.19 lb - $100
Pad (Exped Synmat 7 UL) - 1 lb - $150
Tent (TT Notch) - 1.63 lb - $260
Pack (GG Crown 60) - 2.13 lb - $200

Total weight = 6.95 lb
Total cost = $710

Sierra2015
03-08-2014, 12:49
At the risk of being redundant, you can get a good sleeping bag for half the price. WM isn't the only game in town.
Can I be redundant too? :p

He's exaggerating by going on the high end. We know what he meant. ;)

q-tip
03-08-2014, 12:54
Like Sierra-I tried for 2 lbs. for each big three. I bought the best long term gear I could find that worked for me over the last 10 years. The total cost of my standard 3-season kit was $3,500. As you might think, I don't buy too much gear anymore, I have a complete U/L kit, 3-season, winter, and alpine climbing kit. It all cost about $10,000. Now I'm broke but it's alll good.

Sierra2015
03-08-2014, 13:00
Like Sierra-I tried for 2 lbs. for each big three. I bought the best long term gear I could find that worked for me over the last 10 years. The total cost of my standard 3-season kit was $3,500. As you might think, I don't buy too much gear anymore, I have a complete U/L kit, 3-season, winter, and alpine climbing kit. It all cost about $10,000. Now I'm broke but it's alll good.

Numbers like "3,500" and "10,000" scare me.... I'm hoping to keep the big three down to $750 and have an allowance of 250 for the rest.

Venchka
03-08-2014, 13:11
...
Thank God for the internet and thank the internet for you guys!

You coulda, shoulda, woulda figured it out on your own.
Least expensive way to shop: Buy quality once.
Most expensive way to shop: Buy junk. Buy replacement junk. Buy new junk. Buy quality.

I just put together 3 items (real tent, very real 30 degree bag, highly regarded pack) for fun. All high quality. All reasonably priced for their weight and functionality. Weight: 4 lbs. 10 ounces. Price: $875. No Cubens were harmed in the production of these 3 items.

Have fun Y'all.

Wayne

Slo-go'en
03-08-2014, 13:13
Okay, throw in the climbing gear and I can see where you might get up to 10 grand. I've bought a lot of gear over the years, I might be up to 5 grand by now. Maybe 7 or 8 if you add in all the boots I've worn out :)

If you accumulate the gear over time by replacing worn out or obsolete stuff it doesn't seem as bad as if you have to go out and buy it all new, all at once. Then your in for some serious sticker shock. Even so, if you shop around and make wise choices and trade offs, you can still get a pretty decent kit for under $1,000.

4eyedbuzzard
03-08-2014, 14:00
Numbers like "3,500" and "10,000" scare me.... I'm hoping to keep the big three down to $750 and have an allowance of 250 for the rest.Yeah. They should. That's absurd. I've got a reasonably light (6 1/2 lbs) and pretty decent 3 season (down to freezing) setup with the big three a little over $500 total.

WM Caribou $210 (B&M outfitter end of season auction - yeah, this was a steal)
Neoair pad $90
Golite Jam $80
Etowah Meadows Sil Tarp (lightly used) $90
Granite Gear Haven bug tent (used but NWT) $75

lonehiker
03-08-2014, 14:14
The total cost of my standard 3-season kit was $3,500.

At least 2k too much.

Teacher & Snacktime
03-08-2014, 14:22
Numbers like "3,500" and "10,000" scare me.... I'm hoping to keep the big three down to $750 and have an allowance of 250 for the rest.

What do you need to get with your $250? I'm pretty good at what's called "dirtbagging" and might be able to help.

gollwoods
03-08-2014, 14:35
being able to hike 9-10 hrs at 3 mph is not a description of a fun day for me and I am heavy at 225 plus a 30 lb pack so it wouldn't happen anyway, so the gear I have is not all that light but it is fine for me. whatever you do on your hike is not for the gear weenies it is for you

Sierra2015
03-08-2014, 14:37
Yeah. They should. That's absurd. I've got a reasonably light (6 1/2 lbs) and pretty decent 3 season (down to freezing) setup with the big three a little over $500 total.

WM Caribou $210 (B&M outfitter end of season auction - yeah, this was a steal)
Neoair pad $90
Golite Jam $80
Etowah Meadows Sil Tarp (lightly used) $90
Granite Gear Haven bug tent (used but NWT) $75
I'm going to be a good American and buy new from two small companies. :p And it's not much more to buy new. And I like the idea of having bought direct from companies that have guarantees. (And I like new things.)


What do you need to get with your $250? I'm pretty good at what's called "dirtbagging" and might be able to help.
Clothes! I have absolutely no hiking clothes.... My closet it stuffed full of jeans, t's, and dresses. None of which are helpful. I need hiking poles, that sawyer mini, and various other small things.

Violent Green
03-08-2014, 14:41
Everyone's definition of "good", "a little bit more", and "expensive" are going to be different as those are all terms influenced by personal feelings, tastes and opinions. So, you have to take threads like these with a grain of salt. The moral of the story for me is that it's worth spending some money on quality gear to lighten up your load.

MYOG quilt - 12oz....~$200
MYOG cuben tarp w/ stakes - 8 oz......~$250
Zpacks Zero - 8oz ....~$160

Plenty of cuben was harmed in the making of this gear list.


Ryan

BuckeyeBill
03-08-2014, 15:25
Like Sierra-I tried for 2 lbs. for each big three. I bought the best long term gear I could find that worked for me over the last 10 years. The total cost of my standard 3-season kit was $3,500. As you might think, I don't buy too much gear anymore, I have a complete U/L kit, 3-season, winter, and alpine climbing kit. It all cost about $10,000. Now I'm broke but it's alll good.


Numbers like "3,500" and "10,000" scare me.... I'm hoping to keep the big three down to $750 and have an allowance of 250 for the rest.

Like q-tip, I bought equipment for both Hammock and Ground (Tent). With both these setups plus the remaining gear, I am just under $7600.00. About $500.00 of this is for gear and rope from Dutch so I can make my own whoopie slings, shackles etc. I am buying all new equipment as my present setup is about 20 years old and very heavy. I am buying it now while I am single and don't have to answer to anyone but me.

Drybones
03-08-2014, 15:32
Like Sierra-I tried for 2 lbs. for each big three. I bought the best long term gear I could find that worked for me over the last 10 years. The total cost of my standard 3-season kit was $3,500. As you might think, I don't buy too much gear anymore, I have a complete U/L kit, 3-season, winter, and alpine climbing kit. It all cost about $10,000. Now I'm broke but it's alll good.

Do you have any money left to use that stuff?

Drybones
03-08-2014, 15:38
Numbers like "3,500" and "10,000" scare me.... I'm hoping to keep the big three down to $750 and have an allowance of 250 for the rest.

Numbers like 1,000 scare me.

4eyedbuzzard
03-08-2014, 15:42
Like Sierra-I tried for 2 lbs. for each big three. I bought the best long term gear I could find that worked for me over the last 10 years. The total cost of my standard 3-season kit was $3,500. As you might think, I don't buy too much gear anymore, I have a complete U/L kit, 3-season, winter, and alpine climbing kit. It all cost about $10,000. Now I'm broke but it's alll good.


Like q-tip, I bought equipment for both Hammock and Ground (Tent). With both these setups plus the remaining gear, I am just under $7600.00. About $500.00 of this is for gear and rope from Dutch so I can make my own whoopie slings, shackles etc. I am buying all new equipment as my present setup is about 20 years old and very heavy. I am buying it now while I am single and don't have to answer to anyone but me.I am forwarding the above to my wife so she can see how frugal I have been. ;) Now, off to the golf forum to find some similar posts regarding clubs . . . :D

Sierra2015
03-08-2014, 15:43
Numbers like 1,000 scare me.
Don't worry, I'll explain: 1,000 dollars today is what 200 was when you were a kid.

Look at me! So helpful and sweet. ;)

Dogwood
03-08-2014, 16:09
OMG 1234. My head hurts. Your're worse than me after a pot of coffee wanting to over analyze the minutiae. That must have been a long trip up Sassafras to come up with all that stuff.:p

BuckeyeBill
03-08-2014, 16:11
I am forwarding the above to my wife so she can see how frugal I have been. ;) Now, off to the golf forum to find some similar posts regarding clubs . . . :D

Glad I Could Help.

Odd Man Out
03-08-2014, 16:25
I just did a complete do-over on my gear list. This is what I did:

Underground Quilts Top Flight - $250, 20 oz
SMD Skyscape Trekker Tent - $200, 24 oz
Elemental Horizons Kalais Pack - $230, 27 oz

Average for each piece = $230, 1.5 lbs

Dogwood
03-08-2014, 17:57
Numbers like 1,000 scare me.

I guess you've never seen the ever increasing tally on the U.S. defict sign in Times Square.:) It boggles my mind. I think a meteor may be heading our way.

Tuckahoe
03-08-2014, 19:50
Clothes! I have absolutely no hiking clothes.... My closet it stuffed full of jeans, t's, and dresses. None of which are helpful. I need hiking poles, that sawyer mini, and various other small things.

THRIFT STORES!!!! I swear to God! it's absolutely amazing the number of mildly used outdoor/hiking garments I can get at the thrift store, and cheap. It's in the store because for the "beautiful people" it's last year's fashion and of course they never really wore it for the intended use. And I am happy to pay the $1-6 at the trift store rather than the $80 retail.

Drybones
03-08-2014, 20:02
Don't worry, I'll explain: 1,000 dollars today is what 200 was when you were a kid.

Look at me! So helpful and sweet. ;)

And I was just beginning to like you!

Drybones
03-08-2014, 20:03
THRIFT STORES!!!! I swear to God! it's absolutely amazing the number of mildly used outdoor/hiking garments I can get at the thrift store, and cheap. It's in the store because for the "beautiful people" it's last year's fashion and of course they never really wore it for the intended use. And I am happy to pay the $1-6 at the trift store rather than the $80 retail.

My favorite place to shop...never know what you're going to find.

Drybones
03-08-2014, 20:07
Don't worry, I'll explain: 1,000 dollars today is what 200 was when you were a kid.

Look at me! So helpful and sweet. ;)

I remember buyin a pair of Levis for $2.83...new ones...at a real store

whiskeystick
03-08-2014, 20:13
Rei garage sale was my saving spot lots of the beautiful people near me. Alot of the tags say "wanted better model not used"


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

garlic08
03-08-2014, 20:15
Tarptent Contrail, 1.5 pounds, $200
Gossamer Gear G4, under 1 pound, $75 on sale
EE RevX 20 quilt, just over 1 pound, $180

Yet another instance of lightweight quality gear for a good price.

Everything I carried on my AT thru, including all clothing, shoes, and an excellent Marmot Helium bag that had me comfortable in blizzards in the low teens, cost $850 and weighed less than 10 pounds. Again, it does not have to be toxically expensive.

rafe
03-08-2014, 20:58
In 2006-2007 I acquired at retail for around $600: Tarptent Rainbow, Granite Gear Nimbus Ozone, Mountain Hardwear Phantom 45 bag, Prolite 3S pad. I have no idea what inflation has done to these prices. It's nice being blissfully ignorant of hiking gear and related prices. I'm happy with what I've got.

One of the most cost-effective weight reductions was simply ditching my two Nalgene bottles for a platy bag and a (recyclable) soda bottle. After that it got harder (to lose gear weight.)

1234
03-08-2014, 21:10
Old prices, not all the items included. Deals OK the Tarptent Contrail, 1.5 pounds, $200 I just looked it up it is 1#15oz cost # 209. Does that include stakes? tent bag? hiking poles? You need all those items to make the tent work so I see a total cost of tent, stakes, hiking poles and now add up the total weight and you have a 4 pound set up with a $350 price. REI sub kilo I own one of these A compliable sleeping bag from REi In the Igneo 700 down 30 degree bag, price $319. weight 1# 15 oz and it is DUCK DOWN! Gossamer Gear G4, just looked it up it weights 17 oz that is over a pound and cost $109 Please find me a down bag that is under 2# that is Down 700+ for under $300. I do not know what a quilt is sounds like a blanket to me. I hike in winter March mostly and I need a zero degree bag. I went to the outfitter store and was dumbfounded at the cost of gear. I think a lot of this stuff folks are mentioning is years ago and summer weight. OK find me a 800 down summer bag, 1# for under $200. I looked up a quilt
0*F (-18*C)
FLIGHT JACKET
TOP QUILTFROM $214.95usd Oh that is duck down not goose down the goose down is $279.95 and weights 17 oz tax and or shipping and you are close to $300 this is actually a sweet deal I think, I still think my number are good for TODAYS prices. I did look up a FF WM and you will drop $695 to get a nice zero bag. The sil nylon tents like I said they do not sell you all you need to set up the tent nor do they include the weight of all the stuff you need. A new fly creek is what $259 and weights 2.4lbs Most tents are right at 3 lbs and $300.

Tuckahoe
03-08-2014, 21:26
There is no difference between duck down and goose down as the question should be about fill power. Duck or goose down at 800 fill is the same. Duck down at 700 is not providing the same insulation as 800 fill goose.

lonehiker
03-08-2014, 23:51
You originally said a good sleeping bag cost 600-800. I responded that you could get a good bag for half of that which would be 300-400 range. The Marmot Hydrogen is in that range and is 850+ 30d rated bag that is under 2#. The Helium pushes the limit on the 400 and is a bit over 2#. I found this info by one query. You can change the argument all that you want i.e. next you will want a 0d bag. But, that wasn't your initial assertion.

rafe
03-09-2014, 00:25
Please find me a down bag that is under 2# that is Down 700+ for under $300.

Without too much looking I found a Mountain Hardwear "Ratio 45". $199.95 in regular size. 650 grade down. Total weight 1 lb. 10 oz. The Ratio 32 is $229.95, total weight 1 lb. 13 oz. 650-grade down. At moosejaw.com.

It does appear that down bags have increased in price since I last shopped around. The Phantom 45 is $329.95 right now, I recall spending about half that. (It's got 800 down and is 1 lbs 4 oz. total weight.)

Shonryu
03-09-2014, 01:06
ULA CDT size med 21oz stripped down $140 w shipping
HG Burro TQ 20 $290 w shipping
Zpacks Hexamid plus tarp 16.5oz $275

57.5oz total weight 3.59lbs
Cost $705

shakey_snake
03-09-2014, 02:59
There is no difference between duck down and goose down as the question should be about fill power. Goose down typically has a higher fill power. Duck down only goes to about 550.

shakey_snake
03-09-2014, 03:18
smd gatewood cape:...11 oz..... $130
EERev20................. 1lb 8oz.... $225
Ridgecrest Torso:.......... 8oz...... $30
Osprey Hornet 48......1lb 5oz... $150

4 lbs 0oz, $535

Tuckahoe
03-09-2014, 07:37
Goose down typically has a higher fill power. Duck down only goes to about 550.

Again, fill power is fill power regardless of what animal that the down came from. Down at 750 fill power from either a duck or goose will provide the same insulation at the same weight. But your 550 fill power duck down is a bit on the low side, as Enlightened Equipment offers products with 750 duck down and both Underquilts.com and UGQ offers 700 fill power duck down.

rickb
03-09-2014, 07:45
Again, fill power is fill power regardless of what animal that the down came from. Down at 750 fill power from either a duck or goose will provide the same insulation at the same weight. But your 550 fill power duck down is a bit on the low side, as Enlightened Equipment offers products with 750 duck down and both Underquilts.com and UGQ offers 700 fill power duck down.

My guess is that the difference between 750 and 700 fill depends a great deal on who is doing the measuring.

rafe
03-09-2014, 09:13
Also worth noting that fill-grade is nothing more than density; higher fill grade = lower density. So low-grade down can achieve any rating, it's just gonna weigh more. Or conversely: the reason to pay for higher rating is to lose weight (and as a side-benefit, volume). I'm really happy with my two MH "Phantom" bags and it looks like I got a steal on both of them.

Tuckahoe
03-09-2014, 09:16
My guess is that the difference between 750 and 700 fill depends a great deal on who is doing the measuring.

Just for those that might not know, fill power is the measure of the volume of 1 ounce of down. If 1oz of down fills the volume of 800 cubic inches, then it is 800 fill power.

Never mind human error or the poor maintenance of measuring devices, I believe that 50 cubic inches is significan difference in fill power.

rafe
03-09-2014, 09:27
Just for those that might not know, fill power is the measure of the volume of 1 ounce of down. If 1oz of down fills the volume of 800 cubic inches, then it is 800 fill power.

Never mind human error or the poor maintenance of measuring devices, I believe that 50 cubic inches is significan difference in fill power.


1.067 lb. of 750 grade gives the same insulation as 1.00 lb. of 800 grade. 6.7% weight penalty relative to 800.

1.33 lb. of 600 grade gives the same insulation as 1.00 lb. of 800 grade. 33% weight penalty relative to 800.

1.077 lb. of 650 grade gives the same insulation as 1.00 lb. of 700 grade. 7.7% weight penalty relative to 700.

It's not that one is necessarily warmer or colder than the other.

Drybones
03-09-2014, 09:30
[QUOTE=1234 Please find me a down bag that is under 2# that is Down 700+ for under $300. [/QUOTE]

The silver/purple bag in the forground is an REI bag, 2 lb exactly, 750 down, 15 degree, good to 6' tall. Bought it for the wife but she has never used it, been slept in one night by a young lady on a car camp trip because her bag was not warm enough. Would sell for $180 + shipping if we could work out the transaction.

26260

Tuckahoe
03-09-2014, 09:36
Also worth noting that fill-grade is nothing more than density; higher fill grade = lower density. So low-grade down can achieve any rating, it's just gonna weigh more. Or conversely: the reason to pay for higher rating is to lose weight (and as a side-benefit, volume). I'm really happy with my two MH "Phantom" bags and it looks like I got a steal on both of them.


1.067 lb. of 750 grade gives the same insulation as 1.00 lb. of 800 grade. 6.7% weight penalty relative to 800.

1.33 lb. of 600 grade gives the same insulation as 1.00 lb. of 800 grade. 33% weight penalty relative to 800.

1.077 lb. of 650 grade gives the same insulation as 1.00 lb. of 700 grade. 7.7% weight penalty relative to 700.

It's not that one is necessarily warmer or colder than the other.

You've explained it so much better than I have. And what I should have said is that 50 cubic inches is a measurable difference in volume.

Odd Man Out
03-09-2014, 09:45
1.067 lb. of 750 grade gives the same insulation as 1.00 lb. of 800 grade. 6.7% weight penalty relative to 800.

1.33 lb. of 600 grade gives the same insulation as 1.00 lb. of 800 grade. 33% weight penalty relative to 800.

1.077 lb. of 650 grade gives the same insulation as 1.00 lb. of 700 grade. 7.7% weight penalty relative to 700.

It's not that one is necessarily warmer or colder than the other.

Or to put it another way - 2" of loft in a down bag gives the same insulation value regardless of the rating or origin of the down.

rafe
03-09-2014, 09:55
Getting back to the OP's main point, yes it does cost $$$ to trim off the last few oz. and at some point we have to decide whether it's worth it. Or be persistent, and smart; look for quality pre-owned stuff, closeouts, etc.

I can relate to the constant $$$. I'd be on the trail this very moment if not for my reluctance to plunk down $250 for crampons and snowshoes. I thought I was through shelling out $$$ for hiking gear. Sigh.

garlic08
03-09-2014, 10:17
Old prices, not all the items included. Deals OK the Tarptent Contrail, 1.5 pounds, $200 I just looked it up it is 1#15oz cost # 209. Does that include stakes? tent bag? hiking poles? You need all those items to make the tent work so I see a total cost of tent, stakes, hiking poles and now add up the total weight and you have a 4 pound set up with a $350 price...

I just looked it up too and was surprised to find my old 24 oz Contrail (with titanium stakes) is now 27.5 oz (http://www.tarptent.com/contrail.html) (that's 1#11.5 oz, or 1.7 pounds, not 1#15 oz (where'd you see that?)). The price must have just gone up $9 as well. My stakes and hiking pole (I only use one) didn't cost $150 and weigh 2.3 pounds. You don't need a bag to make a tent work--I can see a difference in mindset here.


...Gossamer Gear G4, just looked it up it weights 17 oz that is over a pound and cost $109...


Unlike many of the smaller manufacturers, GG has sales pretty often. The listed G4 weight includes about 4 ounces of removable or optional weight in padding and waist belt, none of which I use.

The Marmot Helium goes on sale infrequently for under $300 and that's a screaming deal.

rafe
03-09-2014, 10:50
OK, since the top is how to get good light gear at good prices, I'm wondering if any recent thrus have been using the Eureka Solitaire tent? Current version looks quite a bit different from my 1990 vintage model but the price is right ($90.)

Compared to a Tarptent Rainbow, the Solitaire is 9 oz. heavier, considerably less usable space -- but arguably a drier tent than the Rainbow, being double-walled.

Drybones
03-09-2014, 17:25
OK, since the top is how to get good light gear at good prices, I'm wondering if any recent thrus have been using the Eureka Solitaire tent? Current version looks quite a bit different from my 1990 vintage model but the price is right ($90.)

Compared to a Tarptent Rainbow, the Solitaire is 9 oz. heavier, considerably less usable space -- but arguably a drier tent than the Rainbow, being double-walled.

IMO you'd be better off with the Eureka Spitfire 1...much more room and not that much more weight & $$.

rafe
03-09-2014, 17:41
IMO you'd be better off with the Eureka Spitfire 1...much more room and not that much more weight & $$.

It looks good on paper. I actually bought one from Campmor and returned it. Gave it a test run in the back yard and it happened to rain that night. Had to get up and fiddle with it several times, I was unable to keep rain out of the foot end of the tent. Maybe it was defective or cut wrong. I was kinda disappointed.

Kc Fiedler
03-09-2014, 19:01
Let me just chime in and say that my experience has been an average of 1.1 lbs per item (of the shelter, bag, and pack) at ~$200 per item. Both of those are averages of my current summer gear setup which includes a highly modified HH UL Asym, UGQ 50 quilt for summer use, and a GG Gorilla. This is a mid-summer only set up, but it's less than 3.5 lbs for all three pieces of gear and cost me no more than $600 altogether. For those of you disheartened by the OP's suggested retail numbers for good gear, take heart again! Use your head to buy gear, not your wallet. Don't throw money at a problem. Though I do agree with the general suggestion that price increases as weight decreases. It certainly does seem to be that way.

To get my weight down much more, I would have to start throwing a lot of money at my set up. For instance I could replace my HH with a DH Darien UL but that would be a $200 investment for a 2 ounce weight savings. That's $100/ounce. Too high a price for me at the moment.

Like the OP suggested, price drastically increases as your weight reaches the bottom threshold. However, I'd have to politely disagree with the numbers the OP quoted.

Dogwood
03-09-2014, 19:56
"Please find me a down bag that is under 2# that is Down 700+ for under $300." - 1234

http://www.backcountrygear.com/western-mountaineering-highlite.html?gclid=CNbf2_TOhr0CFafm7AodSyUAlA

That's at the extreme UL end in wt(15 oz!) for an UL 850 down accurately temp rated conventional sleeping bag(W/ full length zip and hood) at around $300. And, it's a Western Mountaineering bag. There are actually many more conventional sleeping bags that fit your criteria that go down in temp rating at about $300. All your criteria will probably not be maximized though.

BTW, I picked up a used 800 down Mens Mountain Hardware 15* Phantom at 2 lbs 1 oz for $60 for my nephew at a Goodwill in very good condition(even measured the loft w/ a ruler). Also bought a used Snow Peak Giga stove and a Coleman Solo anodized aluminum cookware set up for him at $10 at another Goodwill like store.

Drybones
03-10-2014, 08:07
It looks good on paper. I actually bought one from Campmor and returned it. Gave it a test run in the back yard and it happened to rain that night. Had to get up and fiddle with it several times, I was unable to keep rain out of the foot end of the tent. Maybe it was defective or cut wrong. I was kinda disappointed.

The Spitfire was my first hiking tent, served me and the dog well, never got wet or had any other issues with it except it weighed 3-lb, 2-oz...I carried only two stakes and cut the others if I needed them...still have the tent and occassionally use it just because I have it but normally use the 26-oz tent I now have.

HooKooDooKu
03-10-2014, 08:53
I need hiking poles...
If you can get access to some bamboo (a neighbor that has a stand growing on their property, or a public right-of-way where some has recently been cut down to clear around utilities) that is about 1-1/4" in diameter, you can make yourself a hiking pole for about $5. All you need is some rubber feet from the local hardware store (optional, but it keeps from wearing out the cane at ground level) and tennis racket handle tape from WalMart. The tennis racket tape makes for a great hand hold that doesn't slip when it is wet (from rain or sweat). The only down side is that you can not collapse it down to a small size, but other than public transportation, that's not a big issue.

Of course there's been an entire thread recently on carrying one or two poles. I personally like only one pole because I can keep one hand free (which also allows the free hand to stay in a pocket when things are cold) and switch hands if one gets tired. I also like a pole that is as tall as I am. It's great for steep down hills (as you can hold your hand higher up the pole) and the extra height is great to maintain a balance when trying to rock-hope a creek (as the pole can reach all the way down under the water without you leaning over).

Tuckahoe
03-10-2014, 09:44
Well here is my stab at a lightweight, cheap and affordable summer kit...

Pack -- Golite Jam 50, 30 ounces, $110

Sleeping bag -- Deuter Dreamlite 500, 21 ounces, $95

Tent -- Appy Trails MkIII, 19 ounces, $100

Total -- $305 and about 4lbs 6oz.

BuckeyeBill
03-10-2014, 12:28
Please find me a down bag that is under 2# that is Down 700+ for under $300." - 1234

Try this (http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/CAMOmnifindQueryCmd?storeId=226&catalogId=40000000226&langId=-1&searchCategory=&ip_state=&ip_constrain=&ip_navtype=search&pageSize=24&currentPage=&ip_sortBy=&searchKeywords=46553)

Dogwood
03-10-2014, 14:01
Goose down typically has a higher fill power...

From what I understand this is correct if Shakey is measuring fill power by comparing the weights of duck and goose down of the same fill power. Although there are different qualities of both duck and goose down(older/younger birds, the region where the birds are from, how they live/migrate, etc) the best goose down clusters are larger and loftier than the best duck down clusters hence duck down can be very slightly more bulkier and heavier compared to the same fill power level of goose down. In other words, a weight and volume penalty is sometimes encountered when opting for duck down verses goose down of the same fill power.


Again, fill power is fill power regardless of what animal that the down came from. Down at 750 fill power from either a duck or goose will provide the same insulation at the same weight.....

Actually no. Again Duck down at the same fill power tends to weigh very slightly more to get the same level of fill power as the best goose down. I get where you were going though.

Despite the consumer bias in favor of goose down verse duck down in the U.S. duck down tends to be currently used as insulation on bulkier heavier less costlier sleeping bags and some down apparel. When being extremely hiking gear wt conscious and having the $ one might opt for the best goose down over duck down. What complicates things further is the large amount of middle range quality duck down hitting the U.S. hiking gear market coming from places like China.

mak1277
03-10-2014, 14:50
My summer big 3:

Pack: ULA CDT - $135, 20 oz

Tent: TarpTent Rainbow - $240, 34 oz

"bag": Army poncho liner - $20, 20 oz (works for me down to about 50*, which is plenty warm for humid VA summer nights)

Total - $395, 4lb 10oz.



As a side note, though, I do think it's a bit disingenuous to simply quote my current set-up and pat myself on the back for being light and (relatively) inexpensive. I'm sure many of us have gone through (and are going through) an evolution in terms of the gear we carry. It's easy to say our current kit only cost $xx when I'm sure a lot of us have spent significantly more on packs, tents, bags just to get to this point. If you're lucky enough to be able to say you only bought one or two of each item, more power to you....but I bet that's the minority.

Malto
03-10-2014, 15:32
As a side note, though, I do think it's a bit disingenuous to simply quote my current set-up and pat myself on the back for being light and (relatively) inexpensive. I'm sure many of us have gone through (and are going through) an evolution in terms of the gear we carry. It's easy to say our current kit only cost $xx when I'm sure a lot of us have spent significantly more on packs, tents, bags just to get to this point. If you're lucky enough to be able to say you only bought one or two of each item, more power to you....but I bet that's the minority.

not a bit disingenuous. If the question was how much did your journey cost to get to your current gear list then it would look a lot different. But, the OP made statements regarding the cost of certain weight pieces of gear that is generating the gear weight and cost of the big 3. Whole different discussion.

apd07c
03-10-2014, 16:00
Everyone's definition of "good", "a little bit more", and "expensive" are going to be different as those are all terms influenced by personal feelings, tastes and opinions. So, you have to take threads like these with a grain of salt. The moral of the story for me is that it's worth spending some money on quality gear to lighten up your load.

MYOG quilt - 12oz....~$200
MYOG cuben tarp w/ stakes - 8 oz......~$250
Zpacks Zero - 8oz ....~$160

Plenty of cuben was harmed in the making of this gear list.


Ryan

I like this list. Mine is near identical. *high five*

Tuckahoe
03-10-2014, 17:04
Actually no. Again Duck down at the same fill power tends to weigh very slightly more to get the same level of fill power as the best goose down. I get where you were going though.

Actually no. The loft of down is measured as fill power and is specifically the cubic inches per ounce of down. It is a pretty standard measure and an ounce of duck down can not be heavier than an ounce of goose down of an equivalent fill power.


http://www.downmark.ca/consumer_information/properties_down.htm

http://www.downmark.ca/consumer_information/down_feather_quality.htm


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UTTLDl_Y98U&feature=youtube_gdata_player


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zrOvedSyvl8&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Venchka
03-10-2014, 17:13
OK, I'll confess. How's this for a "Buy one (almost) and done list:
REI external frame backpack with full length bag. $40. Carried on one overnight trip. Sold for $30. (-)$10. Purchased 1975, + or -.
REI 30 degree Summer Light bag. 3 pounds. $70 with Trailwise stuff sack. Purchased 1975, + or -.
Rivendell Jensen frameless backpack with external pockets. 3 pounds. $55. Purchased 1975, + or -.
Garuda Atman 4 season tent. 4 pounds. $435 (+ or -). Purchased 1994.
$570 total. 10 pounds. Gear fully serviceable. The backpack is still in production. The tent and backpack have few, if any, equals on the market today.
Not included in the current discussion: SVEA 123 stove, pump, fuel bottle, cookset with windscreen/pot support purchased the same time as the sleeping bag & pack. Approximately 1 1/2 pounds. Still in use today.
"If it ain't broke, don't fix it."

Wayne

Drybones
03-10-2014, 17:15
My summer big 3:

Pack: ULA CDT - $135, 20 oz

Tent: TarpTent Rainbow - $240, 34 oz

"bag": Army poncho liner - $20, 20 oz (works for me down to about 50*, which is plenty warm for humid VA summer nights)

Total - $395, 4lb 10oz.



As a side note, though, I do think it's a bit disingenuous to simply quote my current set-up and pat myself on the back for being light and (relatively) inexpensive. I'm sure many of us have gone through (and are going through) an evolution in terms of the gear we carry. It's easy to say our current kit only cost $xx when I'm sure a lot of us have spent significantly more on packs, tents, bags just to get to this point. If you're lucky enough to be able to say you only bought one or two of each item, more power to you....but I bet that's the minority.

It took me 5 packs, 4 tents, 4 bags, 5 pads to get where I am now for a tent set up....now I'm starting on hammocks, have two hammocks and one tarp so far and a bunch of material and amsteel, getting ready to pull the string on buying or making an UQ. I've quit feeling guilty about the $$$, the way I look at it some people collect stamps, coins or cars, I collect hiking gear.

Kc Fiedler
03-10-2014, 18:41
It took me 5 packs, 4 tents, 4 bags, 5 pads to get where I am now for a tent set up....now I'm starting on hammocks, have two hammocks and one tarp so far and a bunch of material and amsteel, getting ready to pull the string on buying or making an UQ. I've quit feeling guilty about the $$$, the way I look at it some people collect stamps, coins or cars, I collect hiking gear.

Haha I can dig this! I feel the same way. We could definitely be spending money on worse stuff!

Dogwood
03-10-2014, 19:11
I'm missing something Tuckahoe. Now, I don't know what I was trying to say. Perhaps, you're right about everything and I got something incorrect.:)

rafe
03-10-2014, 19:12
I think it's perfectly valid to point out that many of us have spent mega $$$ in order to arrive at our current favorites. Hiking styles change, one's focus, goals and petty cash come and go. Then at some point, perhaps, you accept that what you have is quite good enough. Hiking nirvana.

1234
03-10-2014, 19:38
This has been a great learning exp. Y'all have found some great gear at good prices. I sure did fail to give enough details.Summer vs winter bag and by winter I mean AT hike starting March 1. by winter I mean zero degree bag and I know there are those that deem it unnecessary but my wife does. Thanks so much for all the information. PS wife is 5'3", 6 ft bag is to big, she does love the REI HALO but at 0 degrees. WE have the REI Kilo Plus but it went all the way last year and it is well done.

Tuckahoe
03-10-2014, 21:55
I'm missing something Tuckahoe. Now, I don't know what I was trying to say. Perhaps, you're right about everything and I got something incorrect.:)

It's all good. I get where you were going though. ;)

Dogwood
03-10-2014, 22:03
It's all good. I get where you were going though. ;)

hehehehehe

Venchka
03-10-2014, 22:36
Oh, it is winter you want too? I got mild winter covered I do. Bought at the same time as my sturdy Atman tent.
WM Antelope Dryloft bag.
Dana Design Terraplane pack.
L.L. Bean Dryloft Down Parka. Beyond "puffy".
2 white gas and 1 canister/liquid fuel stoves for handling winter cooking needs.

Wayne

Venchka
03-10-2014, 22:43
Confession: I don't pick things to sleep on well at all.
2 air mattresses, 2 foam pads, one Thermarest pad.
Zero comfort from the lot at the moment. I am definitely shopping for something light, warm, light, comfy, light and packs small. I will probably make another bad choice. That seems to be my pattern.

Wayne

Drybones
03-11-2014, 07:50
Confession: I don't pick things to sleep on well at all.
2 air mattresses, 2 foam pads, one Thermarest pad.
Zero comfort from the lot at the moment. I am definitely shopping for something light, warm, light, comfy, light and packs small. I will probably make another bad choice. That seems to be my pattern.

Wayne

Wecome to the club Wayne, we have more members than we would like to admit to. Membership requires the purchase of at least one piece of useless gear per year.

Venchka
03-11-2014, 07:57
Wecome to the club Wayne, we have more members than we would like to admit to. Membership requires the purchase of at least one piece of useless gear per year.

I have a lot of catching up to do.

Wayne

Drybones
03-11-2014, 07:59
I've about come to the conclusion there's not that much difference in 750 and 850 down. I have a 20* REI bag that weighed 31-oz when I bought it, I added 4-oz of 750 down to the bag bringing the total weight to 35-oz. I also have a Marmot Helium 850 down bag that weighs 37-oz. To me they sleep at about the same rating and the 750 bag compresses better.

4eyedbuzzard
03-11-2014, 13:26
Wecome to the club Wayne, we have more members than we would like to admit to. Membership requires the purchase of at least one piece of useless gear per year.In that case, I think I have bought enough in advance for a lifetime membership. Sigh . . .

Drybones
03-11-2014, 19:09
I believe I just earned myself a new UQ for my hammock, dental insurance changed and was going to cost me about $400 more for the root canal I had today if I used my regular dentist instead of a stranger I'd never met...I went with the stranger and the UQ.

Sierra2015
03-11-2014, 23:09
I believe I just earned myself a new UQ for my hammock, dental insurance changed and was going to cost me about $400 more for the root canal I had today if I used my regular dentist instead of a stranger I'd never met...I went with the stranger and the UQ.
I feel like that's how I go about life!

You'll know it's really bad when you're bypassing the dentist altogether and doing your own root canal.