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Texaco
03-10-2014, 12:16
Hey all-

Hoping some of you might be able to look at my gear and tell me what you think. Fly to Atlanta on 04/02, start on 04/04


- Granite Gear Blaze A.C. 60 Pack
- Raincover
- MSR Hubba NX 1 person tent
- Groundcloth
- Campmoor 20 degree down bag (perhaps ditching for just the mummy liner in late spring months through the Whites)
- Thermarest Neo-Air sleeping pad
- Cocoon CoolMax Mummy Liner

- Marmot Minimalist Rain Jacket
- Paramount Valley Convertible Pants *
- North Face Windwall Fleece top
- New Balance Lightning Dry t-shirt (2)*
- New Balance Lightning Dry long sleeve shirt (2)*
- New Balance Light Running shorts (once the convertible pants are ditched)
- SmartWool/REI Brand Wool socks (short and tall)*
- NB LightningDry socks (ankle height, alternate throughout)
- Underarmor/REI Brand/NB wicking underwear (keep 2 with me at a time?)*

*I'd imagine cycling through these depending on where I am on the trail, I.E. the south vs spring/mid trail vs the Whites.


- MSR Pocket Rocket Stove
- MSR fuel canister base
- SnowPeak 700 Cooking Pot
- SnowPeak Long Titanium Spork
- Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter (thread fits Platy bladder)
- 32 oz Water Bottle
- 70oz Platypus Platy Water Bladder

- Spot Gen3 GPS
- Petzl Tikka Xp2
- Black Diamond Alpine Carbon Hiking Poles
- Victorinox Super Tinker Swiss Army Knife
- Suunto A-10 Compass
- 50' bright yellow paracord
- Basic med kit, Multi-Vit, ibuprofen
- Trash compactor bag
- Stuff sacks
- Small plastic shovel
- Organic soap
- Extra tent stakes to be mailed to me if necessary
- Toiletries
- iPhone 5 (with guthook map)
- New Trent 11,000 mAh external battery
- Canon EOS T1i w/ kit 17-55mm lens (I'm a freelance photographer, willing to accept the weight by taking my back-up camera body)
- A.T. guidebook in sections
- Sunglasses
- Red Sox hat :)


As far as shoes, I think I'm going with NB 1210MTs Trail Runners.

That's the majority of it. I'm sure there are some little things I'm missing (batteries, sharpies, etc) but as far as weight composition, this is pretty much all of it. Suggest any changes, or any other thoughts you might have. I'm about 22 days from leaving, but still have a little time to alter things.

Thanks :)

Texaco

Leanthree
03-10-2014, 12:52
Ditch the Red Sox hat...

I doubt you will want to sleep without the neo-air, even when it is warm.

Depending on your finances, a 40 or 45 deg bag could do you well for the warmer months.

Add bear rope.

Otherwise, list looks pretty good. Figuring out when to send your clothing up the trail

takethisbread
03-10-2014, 12:58
Hey all-

Hoping some of you might be able to look at my gear and tell me what you think.


- Granite Gear Blaze A.C. 60 Pack
- Raincover
- MSR Hubba NX 1 person tent
- Groundcloth
- Campmoor 20 degree down mummy bag
- Thermarest Neo-Air sleeping pad (perhaps ditching for just the mummy liner in late spring months through the Whites)
- Cocoon CoolMax Mummy Liner

- Marmot Minimalist Rain Jacket
- Paramount Valley Convertible Pants *
- North Face Windwall Fleece top
- New Balance Lightning Dry t-shirt (2)*
- New Balance Lightning Dry long sleeve shirt (2)*
- New Balance Light Running shorts (once the convertible pants are ditched)
- SmartWool/REI Brand Wool socks (short and tall)*
- NB LightningDry socks (ankle height, alternate throughout)
- Underarmor/REI Brand/NB wicking underwear (keep 2 with me at a time?)*

*I'd imagine cycling through these depending on where I am on the trail, I.E. the south vs spring/mid trail vs the Whites.


- MSR Pocket Rocket Stove
- MSR fuel canister base
- SnowPeak 700 Cooking Pot
- SnowPeak Long Titanium Spork
- Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter (thread fits Platy bladder)
- 32 oz Water Bottle
- 70oz Platypus Platy Water Bladder

- Spot Gen3 GPS
- Petzl Tikka Xp2
- Black Diamond Alpine Carbon Hiking Poles
- Victorinox Super Tinker Swiss Army Knife
- Suunto A-10 Compass
- Basic med kit, Multi-Vit, ibuprofen
- Trash compactor bag
- Stuff sacks
- Small plastic shovel
- Organic soap
- Extra tent stakes to be mailed to me if necessary
- Toiletries
- iPhone 5 (with guthook map)
- New Trent 11,000 mAh external battery
- Canon EOS T1i w/ kit 17-55mm lens (I'm a freelance photographer, willing to accept the weight by taking my back-up camera body)
- A.T. guidebook in sections
- Sunglasses
- Red Sox hat :)


As far as shoes, I think I'm going with NB 1210MTs Trail Runners.

That's the majority of it. I'm sure there are some little things I'm missing (batteries, sharpies, etc) but as far as weight composition, this is pretty much all of it. Suggest any changes, or any other thoughts you might have. I'm about 22 days from leaving, but still have a little time to alter things.

Thanks :)

Texaco
compass? for what?
GPS save for the CDT
also a departure date would be helpful. u might need warmer jacket gloves hat ect depending on when u leave springer. what u need is dependent on what season you are hiking in.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Texaco
03-10-2014, 13:05
Ditch the Red Sox hat...

I doubt you will want to sleep without the neo-air, even when it is warm.

Depending on your finances, a 40 or 45 deg bag could do you well for the warmer months.

Add bear rope.

Otherwise, list looks pretty good. Figuring out when to send your clothing up the trail

Red sox hat is a must.

Noting what I wrote, I meant to add the "ditch for just the bag liner" to the sleeping bag part, NOT the thermarest. Sorry about that typo.

I've got a few 50' sections of paracord, I'd imagine having one with me at a time.




compass? for what?
GPS save for the CDT
also a departure date would be helpful.

Departure date is in my signature, not sure if that shows up on the Tapatalk app. April 2nd. Compass for............ (no valid reason, just seemed like something that would be better to have than have not?) My Northface fleece is typically my only jacket I use in New England winter for activities down to 25-30 or so. A fleece hat of types might be useful for colder nights in a sleeping bag.

Leanthree
03-10-2014, 13:08
Red sox hat is a must.

Just giving you a hard time.

Texaco
03-10-2014, 13:11
Just giving you a hard time.

I figured, once I saw where you were from ;)

Slo-go'en
03-10-2014, 13:11
He's leaving in 22 days, or about the first of April. And I think the comment about ditching the neoair was ment for the bag liner listed just below the pad.

With the iPhone, no real need for the GPS or compass. No need for the plastic shovel. The shorts are good to have all the time so you have something to wear while doing laundry and you never know if you'll have a chance to go swiming someplace - like a motel pool.

Other then that and adding some bear bagging line, I'd say your good to go.

takethisbread
03-10-2014, 13:14
Red sox hat is a must.

Noting what I wrote, I meant to add the "ditch for just the bag liner" to the sleeping bag part, NOT the thermarest. Sorry about that typo.

I've got a few 50' sections of paracord, I'd imagine having one with me at a time.





Departure date is in my signature, not sure if that shows up on the Tapatalk app. April 2nd. Compass for............ (no valid reason, just seemed like something that would be better to have than have not?) My Northface fleece is typically my only jacket I use in New England winter for activities down to 25-30 or so. A fleece hat of types might be useful for colder nights in a sleeping bag.

ok not saying the fleece is not enough, but I can tell u I have lived in Boston my whole life and I also wear just a sweatshirt all day . but 12 hours in cold rain is something completely different that I encountered in Georgia . it's under appreciated . so be prepared to being wet shivering coming into camp, and needing to warm your hands and body ,
my start date is April 1 so I'm sure I will see u. two Bostonians on the trail at same time. (I now live on the vineyard) .


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Texaco
03-10-2014, 13:52
With the iPhone, no real need for the GPS or compass. No need for the plastic shovel. The shorts are good to have all the time so you have something to wear while doing laundry and you never know if you'll have a chance to go swiming someplace - like a motel pool.

Other then that and adding some bear bagging line, I'd say your good to go.

Noted on the compass account. Really, no shovel? It's negligibly small, weighs almost nothing. Understood on the extra shorts. I had forgotten to add the paracord, but I edited that into my list.

Thanks for the input.


ok not saying the fleece is not enough, but I can tell u I have lived in Boston my whole life and I also wear just a sweatshirt all day . but 12 hours in cold rain is something completely different that I encountered in Georgia . it's under appreciated . so be prepared to being wet shivering coming into camp, and needing to warm your hands and body ,
my start date is April 1 so I'm sure I will see u. two Bostonians on the trail at same time. (I now live on the vineyard) .

I've got another layer, an LL Bean microfleece type long sleeve 1/4 zip. That, combined with my North Face, keeps me warm at 0 degrees with wind outside. Having the Marmot will add to wind protection. Sounds good, look forward to seeing you!

lonehiker
03-10-2014, 14:00
By the time you get to Neels Gap you will know if you are missing anything and can buy it there. Likewise, you will also know what you are carrying that you may not need and can mail home from there as well. But, don't get rid of your cold weather clothing too early. You will most likely still get a bit of snow and a few days of pretty cold temps.

Sarcasm the elf
03-10-2014, 14:10
Grab the patch kit that is made specifically for the neo-air and carry at least one patch with you. The pad is fairly tough but it's easy to get a pinhole puncture if you're not paying attention, the patch on mine has lasted for years. Also remember that duct tape doesnt stick to silnylon very well, so the patch kit is the only way I've found to field repair a lightweight pad.

Bring a compass, get a small light one and know the basics of how to use it.

Texaco
03-10-2014, 14:29
By the time you get to Neels Gap you will know if you are missing anything and can buy it there. Likewise, you will also know what you are carrying that you may not need and can mail home from there as well. But, don't get rid of your cold weather clothing too early. You will most likely still get a bit of snow and a few days of pretty cold temps.

After the winter so far, I won't be surprised if the snow sticks around for a bit longer into my hike. I'll certainly be interested to see what I boot out of the pack come Neels Gap.


Grab the patch kit that is made specifically for the neo-air and carry at least one patch with you. The pad is fairly tough but it's easy to get a pinhole puncture if you're not paying attention, the patch on mine has lasted for years. Also remember that duct tape doesnt stick to silnylon very well, so the patch kit is the only way I've found to field repair a lightweight pad.

Bring a compass, get a small light one and know the basics of how to use it.

My patch kit that came with the NeoAir is in a zip-loc in the bottom of it's little stuff sack. I'll certainly heed your advice. I certainly appreciate everyone's input, but I've got a feeling the compass is coming with me regardless. The one mentioned above weighs in at 0.95 ounces. Better to have than have not.

Slo-go'en
03-10-2014, 15:08
I've got another layer, an LL Bean microfleece type long sleeve 1/4 zip. That, combined with my North Face, keeps me warm at 0 degrees with wind outside. Having the Marmot will add to wind protection. Sounds good, look forward to seeing you!

I don't wear much during the winter either, since it's just a short walk to the car and then into the store, or if I'm going for a power walk, or shoveling the driveway. When you know your not going to be out in the cold for too long and have a nice warm house/office to spend most of your day in, you can get away with that.

However, when your out there 24/7 and sitting around waiting for dinner to cook and it's 40 degrees and it's been raining all day - or the last 4 days, that's a whole different situation.

Sarcasm the elf
03-10-2014, 15:13
My patch kit that came with the NeoAir is in a zip-loc in the bottom of it's little stuff sack. I'll certainly heed your advice. I certainly appreciate everyone's input, but I've got a feeling the compass is coming with me regardless. The one mentioned above weighs in at 0.95 ounces. Better to have than have not.

That's cool, the Neoair I have was purchased in 2009 and didnt come with a patch. I'm glad to knkw that they are now including one.

TroutknuT
03-10-2014, 17:31
A Texaco not a Citco sign? Go Sox.Go Pats, Go Bruins,Go Celtics,Go Revalution!!!!

Texaco
03-10-2014, 18:36
A Texaco not a Citco sign? Go Sox.Go Pats, Go Bruins,Go Celtics,Go Revalution!!!!

The history of Texaco oil is a tad bit more interesting than Cities Service Co. I'm a big antique petrolium guy, I love their vintage adversiting.

And go everything Boston sports :)

cliffdiver
03-10-2014, 19:00
What are you carrying the Canon and lens in? Searching for options now for my Nikon D3100 to carry with me.

Kc Fiedler
03-10-2014, 19:00
I'd really encourage you to take a cat hole trowel. Try a titanium one, the plastic ones are bulky and will break on you after a couple weeks (not might, will). Too many people hike the AT thinking that it's enough to just lift up a rock, poop under it, and then put the rock back in place. Or people try to dig a cat hole with their boots or poles. It's rarely deep enough, hardly ever well covered, and leaves high trafficked campsites smelling like dung with little TP blossoms sticking out from behind every tree. It's disgusting. I set my pack in a pile of human fleeces one time on the AT, right next to the trail. I was rather upset to say the least. I am guilty of once being in the "I'll dig a hole with my boot" camp but I gotta say your head is in the right place bringing a trowel. Kudos.

gof
03-10-2014, 19:18
Try an REI snow stake instead of the shovel. Wide and sturdy enough to dig a hole and can be used as a stake (imagine that) if needed. I thin it might last the whole trip.

http://www.rei.com/product/845328/rei-snow-stake

Texaco
03-10-2014, 19:32
What are you carrying the Canon and lens in? Searching for options now for my Nikon D3100 to carry with me.

Honestly I haven't put much thought into it. It's my back-up body, so it rarely gets used. It'll probably live on my chest strap or in the lid of my bag. As far as a case, mock me all you want but I'll probably throw it in a Crown Royal bag. Soft, compact, etc. I debated for a long time bringing a 35 or 28 prime, but didn't want to lose the focal length.


I'd really encourage you to take a cat hole trowel.... Kudos.

I'll be taking one. I'll look into the titanium idea. Thanks for your input!


Try an REI snow stake instead of the shovel.

I'll look into that! Thank you.

lonehiker
03-10-2014, 21:31
I'd really encourage you to take a cat hole trowel. Try a titanium one, the plastic ones are bulky and will break on you after a couple weeks (not might, will). Too many people hike the AT thinking that it's enough to just lift up a rock, poop under it, and then put the rock back in place. Or people try to dig a cat hole with their boots or poles. It's rarely deep enough, hardly ever well covered, and leaves high trafficked campsites smelling like dung with little TP blossoms sticking out from behind every tree. It's disgusting. I set my pack in a pile of human fleeces one time on the AT, right next to the trail. I was rather upset to say the least. I am guilty of once being in the "I'll dig a hole with my boot" camp but I gotta say your head is in the right place bringing a trowel. Kudos.

Disagree with you reference plastic trowel. With handle cut off it can hardly be considered bulky and only weighs 1.1 oz. Furthermore, I have been using the same orange plastic trowel for at least 15 years. So when is mine going to break? I do agree with you that just lifting a rock is not proper LNT practice.

Kc Fiedler
03-10-2014, 23:06
Disagree with you reference plastic trowel. With handle cut off it can hardly be considered bulky and only weighs 1.1 oz. Furthermore, I have been using the same orange plastic trowel for at least 15 years. So when is mine going to break? I do agree with you that just lifting a rock is not proper LNT practice.

It should break any second now. Seriously though. I'm sure some people keep their trowels going. I've gone through more plastic trowels leading backpacking trips than I care to count though. Clearly there are exceptions to every experience.

Sierra2015
03-11-2014, 04:36
It should break any second now. Seriously though. I'm sure some people keep their trowels going. I've gone through more plastic trowels leading backpacking trips than I care to count though. Clearly there are exceptions to every experience.
Stop hacking at sh**. Lol

Treat it like a baby?

q-tip
03-11-2014, 11:20
I'm curious, have you weighed all of this. By looking at the weights of each item it might help you with your final decision making. By the time you geto Neels Gap you should have a pretty good idea what to keep, change or trudge on with...

Texaco
03-11-2014, 11:48
q-tip...

I fly a lot for work, typically home for less than 24 hours at a time. All of this gear has been delivered, but I haven't had time to weigh it yet. That will come this weekend, and I'll report back weights.

Bagge Pants
03-12-2014, 11:37
I haven't read all the replies but here it goes...

As a general rule, while backpacking I don't take extra clothing of any article other than socks. So you only need 1 lightning dry short sleeve or one lightning dry long sleeve, perhaps both but not two of each.

As far as two pair of underwear I'd rather just take one pair of compression shorts and one pair of compressions pants and alternate as underwear during the day and night.

If you're trying to save weight you can do without the fuel canister stand. I don't see a fuel canister 3/4 windscreen on your list. That's more important than a stand.

You're going to have to go ultralight if you want the carbon poles to last a long time. They make aluminum lightweight poles that have more integrity than the carbon and weigh only a smidgen more.

You don't need a swiss army knife but I understand why people bring stuff like a knife, compass and map. I do too. I like using them- I like going off trail at times, etc.

You could cut off ten feet of the paracord and bring ten foot of a thin line or an xtra boot lace. It will give you more options. Ideally you don't want a yellow cord. That would potentially make it easier for critters to see in the dark. The best is black cord with reflective threadings.

Multi vitamins aren't essential as with most things in a med kit but, that's a personal choice. :)

You could ditch the trowel and use anything else to dig an 8" hole.

Sunglasses aren't really essential in a wooded area.

Those shoes you are choosing are ones that I really want to try out too.

Hope any of my suggestions make sense and help with any ideas!

Venchka
03-12-2014, 11:44
I figured, once I saw where you were from ;)

Carry a spare Red Sox hat if needed.
Sunglasses are a must. End of discussion.

Wayne

Still Debatin
03-12-2014, 15:28
I didn't see rain pants on the list. Once the zip-off pants are wet they will not due much to block wind or rain. You will see experienced hikers wearing black long underwear tights under jogging shorts. The combined weight of a pair of tights and lightweight rain pants can be less than the zip-offs. You can read about the Mountain Crossings gear list at:

http://www.backpacker.com/november_08_pack_man/articles/12659?page=4

http://www.backpacker.com/2007/images/november08/mtncrossmeth_445.jpg

Bagge Pants
03-12-2014, 15:43
regarding rain wear, as a tarper I use my tarp as a poncho/pack cover and my groundcloth as a rain skirt

Texaco
03-12-2014, 15:45
I haven't read all the replies but here it goes...

Clothing wise, I see your point of one of each shirt type, and multiple pairs of socks. The windscreen is absolutely something I'll need to consider- thanks for bringing that up. Any specific kinds that are better than others? Aluminum foil? I appreciate the potential lack of need, but I like the idea of having a multi-tool type, compass, etc. I carry a 4" spring assisted blade every day anyways, so I'm used to always having something with me along those lines.

The yellow cord is really a concern for an animal to see? I got yellow so I wouldn't forget it somewhere. I suppose the theory is the same thing between myself and a little critter...

I'm excited for the NBs. They're a client of mine and are supplying my clothing and shoes. I've had long conversations with their running development department and the 1210s and 910s were the #1 and #2 recommended trail runners for this trip.

Thanks for your insight!

Texaco
03-12-2014, 15:45
Carry a spare Red Sox hat if needed.
Sunglasses are a must. End of discussion.

Fellow Sox guy?? Sunglasses are coming.

Texaco
03-12-2014, 15:47
I didn't see rain pants on the list. You will see experienced hikers wearing black long underwear tights under jogging shorts. The combined weight of a pair of tights and lightweight rain pants can be less than the zip-offs.

Thanks for the link and photo. I don't have them on the list, and hadn't really planned on having any. "I'm going to get wet either way" (I'm channeling my inner WhiteBlaze quotations). I've got a few pairs of NB running tights, which I'll be wearing under convertible pants and jogging shorts alike until the weather is dry/warmer.

jberretta7
03-12-2014, 17:21
+1 to everyone who said you'll know what you will need and what you can shed by the time you get to neel's gap. As for the compass, if you have a guidebook at least, you'll know what is around the corner as for altitude and even direction. If it's an ounce that will give you some piece of mind then go for it. But that first 50 miles, I don't see how you could get lost. The trail seems to follow an old train track bed and the white blazes will always guide you.

Everyone takes creature comforts no matter the weight. Don't let an ultralight nazi (not saying all of them are!) try and guilt you into losing things that you rather take. For instance, i take a 3+ pound 3 legged stool to plop down on after hiking for hours. Its super nice and its purely for my comfort. My dad chose to bring a huge pillow and my brother brought a sketchpad (he's an artist and would do landscapes when we would take breaks.) Everyone has an opinion and this is a great place to garner knowledge but in the end, hike your own hike sir, for it will be with you forever.

lonehiker
03-12-2014, 18:13
The yellow cord is really a concern for an animal to see? I got yellow so I wouldn't forget it somewhere. I suppose the theory is the same thing between myself and a little critter...

Your yellow cord is fine.

Forestboy
03-13-2014, 11:15
Please take a look at my gear list (NOBO thru 3/19 departure). I appreciate any and all input.

PACK: GG AC 60 (liner, cuben cover)
SHELTER: Shire Contrail (Tyvek groundcloth)
SLEEP: Marmot Helium 15, Neoair Xtherm (repair), down socks (covers)
CLOTHING (OUTER): Lukesultralight silnylon jacket & pants, MH Ghost Whisperer jacket, boiled wool chook, SW merino gloves, billed hat, Prana Zion pant, Pata GII short
CLOTHING (INNER): SW merino LS shirts (2), SW merino gaiter, (3) SW merino unders, Melanzana grid crew, (3) SW PhD heavyweight merino socks
BOOTS: Merrell mid-Moab (Gtx)
COOK: Snowpeak Solo pot/lid, Evernew titanium alcohol stove/DX stand, titanium spork, 12oz plastic fuel bottles (8oz/4oz), (2) small BIC lighters
WATER: Platy70&1L, Aqua Mira
HYGIENE: Toothbrush, (2oz) toothpowder, comb, mirror, 4oz Bronnerís soap, lotion, (2) TP, micro-towel
FIRST AID: Moleskin, Compeed, glide, Bandaids, Neosporin, zinc ox, 80mg aspirin
FOOD SACK: Hybrid cuben bear bag, Dynaglide line, small carabiner
DITTY BAG: Tika headlamp (extra AAA batteries), Swiss Army Classic, Nikon AW-110 (extra EN EL-12, 32GB SD), Kindle (neoprene case), Tracphone, common charger, trail guide, journal, pencil, duct tape, Dynaglide line, prescription transition glasses (neoprene case), Ziplock bags (1gal, 1qt), trash bag
OTHER: REI hiking staff, Katoolah micro-spikes (bag)

ALTERNATE/RESUPPLY ITEMS: GGAC 60 pack, Ion headlamp, Blackrock down hat, Kuhl Liberator zip-pants, MH kilt, TEVA Mush sandals, OR mittens, (2) SW merino SS shirts, (3) SW PhD medium-weight merino socks, FF Rock Wren sleep bag, Sawyer filter

Thanks

Bagge Pants
03-13-2014, 13:36
Please take a look at my gear list (NOBO thru 3/19 departure). I appreciate any and all input.

PACK: GG AC 60 (liner, cuben cover)
SHELTER: Shire Contrail (Tyvek groundcloth)
SLEEP: Marmot Helium 15, Neoair Xtherm (repair), down socks (covers)
CLOTHING (OUTER): Lukesultralight silnylon jacket & pants, MH Ghost Whisperer jacket, boiled wool chook, SW merino gloves, billed hat, Prana Zion pant, Pata GII short
CLOTHING (INNER): SW merino LS shirts (2), SW merino gaiter, (3) SW merino unders, Melanzana grid crew, (3) SW PhD heavyweight merino socks
BOOTS: Merrell mid-Moab (Gtx)
COOK: Snowpeak Solo pot/lid, Evernew titanium alcohol stove/DX stand, titanium spork, 12oz plastic fuel bottles (8oz/4oz), (2) small BIC lighters
WATER: Platy70&1L, Aqua Mira
HYGIENE: Toothbrush, (2oz) toothpowder, comb, mirror, 4oz Bronner’s soap, lotion, (2) TP, micro-towel
FIRST AID: Moleskin, Compeed, glide, Bandaids, Neosporin, zinc ox, 80mg aspirin
FOOD SACK: Hybrid cuben bear bag, Dynaglide line, small carabiner
DITTY BAG: Tika headlamp (extra AAA batteries), Swiss Army Classic, Nikon AW-110 (extra EN EL-12, 32GB SD), Kindle (neoprene case), Tracphone, common charger, trail guide, journal, pencil, duct tape, Dynaglide line, prescription transition glasses (neoprene case), Ziplock bags (1gal, 1qt), trash bag
OTHER: REI hiking staff, Katoolah micro-spikes (bag)

ALTERNATE/RESUPPLY ITEMS: GGAC 60 pack, Ion headlamp, Blackrock down hat, Kuhl Liberator zip-pants, MH kilt, TEVA Mush sandals, OR mittens, (2) SW merino SS shirts, (3) SW PhD medium-weight merino socks, FF Rock Wren sleep bag, Sawyer filter

Thanks

Keep in mind I'm just answering because I'm bored :)

Looks like you have plenty of options and don't need to acquire anything else. You could probably figure out a way to only take one pair of pants and one pair of shorts if you want more pack room or more pack space. An option would be leave the ultra light pants and leave the zion pants and leave the shorts as well and just go with the zip off pants out the gate..

I would also not take an extra long sleeve shirt. Also noticed you have a pack liner, pack cover and an extra trash bag. Maybe you'll figure out one of those three will work perfectly fine. Your ditty bag looks quite heavy with those contents but that is probably something you're aware of.

Have fun, your start is soon!

swonut
03-13-2014, 15:13
I'm due in Atlanta on 17MAR, so I'm a little heavier in jackets. (Ghost Whisperer and wind shell vs a fleece) However, it looks to me like your battery is large (I'm going with a Morphie juicepak 4200 mah) and I'm bringing an iPad mini and iPhone. I'd also switch the compass for one of those $5 watch band types and just put it on your sternum strap or somewhere else. (remember that the iPhone has a compass.)

Also remember that your squeeze is useless if your platy blows out. For me, I'm going with a 1L Seltzer bottle that can in a pinch be used with the squeeze

I also decided to go with a Ti spoon (Virago) vs a spork since I figured there was little to "fork" and, me being me, it was more likely to puncture something.

I also didn't see any gloves. I'd think about adding a cheap pair of the latex gripper gloves. I've found them indispensable when it's cold and you have to do some manual manipulation such as getting your stove going or dorking with tent guylines, especially when it's wet or there's ice/frost.

It looks like a good kit and I'm sure you'll be tweaking it along the way. For me, the hardest thing to exercise is restraint; and I have to keep repeating, "Less is more"

What apps are you taking?

myakka_
03-13-2014, 15:23
I just read the whole thread, and want to offer one small opinion. It was offered to ditch the compass and gps since you have an i-phone. I think a small button compass is a must. Granted most of the AT is marked like a highway. (I understand, I haven't seen the whole thing.) But IF you got off trail, you would need something reliable to orient you. *And there have been hikers who have gotten lost on the trail.

An i-phone is "fragile" technology. Batteries, breakage, loss, any of these can leave you in need. I have a cheap little round compass that weighs about as much as a paper clip, and safety pins to my pack.

I get that ounces are important, but so is safety, and when in the woods, a compass is part of my minimal gear. Just my opinion though.

Lambarrassment
03-13-2014, 15:55
Hey Texaco, I've got nothing to add to these useful comments, but if you see another young guy out there rocking a Sox cap, it might just be me! Good luck!

kycali
03-15-2014, 08:19
Make sure to test your platypus bladder with the sawyer squeeze (as in squeezing water through it). I did not do that beforehand and found on my first night that water gushed out the sides making it useless. It fit on, but the threading was not tight enough. I had to get an inline filter to make it work. They may have changed either or both so just be certain!

Texaco
03-18-2014, 08:45
I'm due in Atlanta on 17MAR, so I'm a little heavier in jackets. I also didn't see any gloves. It looks like a good kit and I'm sure you'll be tweaking it along the way. For me, the hardest thing to exercise is restraint; and I have to keep repeating, "Less is more"

What apps are you taking?

I wish you luck with your start! I'm assuming you're starting today if you landed yesterday. I'll be adding a cheap pair of gloves, thanks for the suggestion. As far as apps, I think the Guthook one? $90-100 for total maps I think.


I just read the whole thread, and want to offer one small opinion. An i-phone is "fragile" technology. Batteries, breakage, loss, any of these can leave you in need. I have a cheap little round compass that weighs about as much as a paper clip, and safety pins to my pack.

Worry not... compass is coming.


Hey Texaco, I've got nothing to add to these useful comments, but if you see another young guy out there rocking a Sox cap, it might just be me! Good luck!

I'll keep an eye out for ya!


Make sure to test your platypus bladder with the sawyer squeeze (as in squeezing water through it). I did not do that beforehand and found on my first night that water gushed out the sides making it useless. It fit on, but the threading was not tight enough. I had to get an inline filter to make it work. They may have changed either or both so just be certain!

Definitely a good thought. I'll be checking it this upcoming week. Thanks for the input!

Texaco
03-18-2014, 09:01
I'm curious, have you weighed all of this. By looking at the weights of each item it might help you with your final decision making. By the time you geto Neels Gap you should have a pretty good idea what to keep, change or trudge on with...

Put it loaded on a scale this past Friday. I had my basic clothing in there, meaning one pair of each article save for socks and compression shorts, and also had the hiking poles strapped on the bag. Slipped my mind that I'd be wearing some of the clothes and using the poles while walking. Subtracting their weight from the bag I'm at 16.2 lbs. In the interest of disclosure, 2 pounds of that is my camera.

So in the grand scheme of things, how does that compare to the norm? It's certainly not the heaviest, certainly not the lightest, but what's the median weight on here?

Texaco
03-18-2014, 09:09
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/djflyy/djflyy013/IMG_8752-3.jpg
(1 North Face and 1 LLBean Fleece were added when weighed)

http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e308/djflyy/djflyy013/IMG_8749-2.jpg

Venchka
03-18-2014, 09:09
Your camera is too light. :) :cool:

Wayne

Venchka
03-18-2014, 09:12
Colin Fletcher would be proud of your gear display. Good looking pack. It swallowed all of your gear. Any room left for food & water?
Cheers!

Wayne

Venchka
03-18-2014, 09:17
Fellow Sox guy?? Sunglasses are coming.

Yep. Since the day I sat on the 3rd base foul line at Fenway. Ted Williams against the Cleveland Indians. The Sox won. I've been hooked ever since.
Good luck. I'm envious.

Wayne

CarlZ993
03-18-2014, 17:39
I'd really encourage you to take a cat hole trowel. Try a titanium one, the plastic ones are bulky and will break on you after a couple weeks (not might, will). Too many people hike the AT thinking that it's enough to just lift up a rock, poop under it, and then put the rock back in place. Or people try to dig a cat hole with their boots or poles. It's rarely deep enough, hardly ever well covered, and leaves high trafficked campsites smelling like dung with little TP blossoms sticking out from behind every tree. It's disgusting. I set my pack in a pile of human fleeces one time on the AT, right next to the trail. I was rather upset to say the least. I am guilty of once being in the "I'll dig a hole with my boot" camp but I gotta say your head is in the right place bringing a trowel. Kudos.
I used a titanium trowel & highly recommend it. Saw some improperly covered human waste from the 'I don't need a trowel' crowd. Mine weighed 0.6 oz. A snow stake would also work (serve multiple duties).

I also took a compass. Never used it. Never go into the woods without one. That's just me.

I took a GPS just to log my campsite coordinates. If I had it do to do all over again, I wouldn't take it on the AT. I would on the other long hikes - PCT, CDT, CT, etc.

You might take a stuff sack for your hiking shoes. They'll get wet & freeze at night. Put them in the stuff sack & inside your sleeping bag. No frozen shoes.

Wish you luck on your hike. Happy trails!

Trail Ponderer
03-18-2014, 22:02
If your Platypus bag doesn't fit well on your Sawyer Squeeze, you can use Smartwater bottles (1 liter or 700ml). Evernew bags also work but may be hard to find. I picked up a Evernew bag from Trail Designs.com. I have also used the bags that came with the Sawyer and they have held up well for me but I usually carry a backup.

I am experimenting with the 1210 at home. I found the 910 a little tight. Did you get a smaller size than you normally wear? I wear a size 14 and normally have damaged toenails wearing the size 14 wearing mostly Vasque boots. Wearing the NB1210 size 14, I have about a inch of room up front. I'm wondering if these will work once I am on the trail carrying the pack and the normal foot swelling. I will be testing for awhile before I hit the trail. I'm starting my section in Hot Springs May 1 Northbound.
Good luck on your thru hike.

Other
03-19-2014, 04:13
Carry nothing but your sleeping bag and cartons of cigarettes. they are light and you can barter for food from all of the people who decided that they would give up smoking and hike the AT.

Texaco
03-19-2014, 13:04
Wish you luck on your hike. Happy trails!

I like the stuff sack idea for shoes. Thanks for the input & best wishes!


Yep. Since the day I sat on the 3rd base foul line at Fenway... I've been hooked ever since.


Wayne- I was lucky enough to be at Game 2 this past Series, and to be on the Boston Duck Boat with Pedroia, Ellsbury, & MacDonald during the World Series parade, photographing for the Sox. I'll post some pictures up for you when I've got my work hard drive up and running. Rode in that orange duck boat from Fenway, down Boylston, out into the Charles, and back, with 4+ million screaming fans, confetti, and booze. Seriously one of the best experiences of my life professionally and personally.


If your Platypus bag doesn't fit well on your Sawyer Squeeze, you can use Smartwater bottles (1 liter or 700ml). Evernew bags also work but may be hard to find. I picked up a Evernew bag from Trail Designs.com. I have also used the bags that came with the Sawyer and they have held up well for me but I usually carry a backup.

I am experimenting with the 1210 at home. I found the 910 a little tight. Did you get a smaller size than you normally wear? I wear a size 14 and normally have damaged toenails wearing the size 14 wearing mostly Vasque boots. Wearing the NB1210 size 14, I have about a inch of room up front. I'm wondering if these will work once I am on the trail carrying the pack and the normal foot swelling. I will be testing for awhile before I hit the trail. I'm starting my section in Hot Springs May 1 Northbound.
Good luck on your thru hike.

I'll report back my luck with the Platy. Thanks for the input on the SmartWater bottles.

Re: New Balance... I'm not surprised you thought the 910s were tight. They're known/designed for being a tighter shoe. I'll have 2 weeks with my 1210s to get comfy before I head out. The running department at NB is waiting to hear if I like them or not before sending me out more pairs for the actual hike. I'm interested to see how they are!


Carry nothing but your sleeping bag and cartons of cigarettes. they are light and you can barter for food from all of the people who decided that they would give up smoking and hike the AT.

Sound advice ;-)