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joannaxvx
03-17-2014, 22:56
Hey everyone, I'm leaving April 14th and I would love some tips on what to ditch or replace before I go!



Osprey Aura 65
57


TarpTent Moment DW
38.56


Mountain Hardwear UltraLamina 32
38.6


Dry Sack



Thermarest ZLite SOL 3/4
10.36



144.52/9.03


I'm considering cutting the pad to 6 panels which should be 6.22 oz. and just using clothes for a pillow instead of a few folded up panels. Still need a dry sack for my sleeping bag. Unfortunately the 13L S2S is slightly too small.







EMS Techwik MW Base Layer Top
5.74


EMS Techwik MW Base Layer Tights
5.5


Outdoor Research Echo T-Shirt
2.08


Reebok spandex shorts
2.36


Columbia Glacial Fleece III Pullover
5.92


Mountain Hardwear Thermostatic Jacket
10.5


Marmot Anne Wind Jacket
3.34


Mountain Hardwear Epic Rain Jacket
11.6


Lorpen Extreme Thermolite Socks
5.84


Injinji Toe Socks
1.4


UnderArmour underwear
0.38


balaclava
1.86


Gordini Ultra Dri-Max VI Mittens
4.5


North Face Apex Gloves
3.24


Sea to Summit Ultra-Sil Dry Sack 13L
1.54



65.8/4.11


Those Lorpen socks are heavyweight and knee-length and I love them because I'm skinny and get really cold easily when I'm not moving. However, if it comes down to it, I do have some midweight socks at 3.02. And obviously I'm only taking mittens or gloves but the mittens keep my fingers warmer so I don't know.








Snow Peak Litemax Stove
1.9


MSR Quick Solo Pot 1.3L
7.5


GSI Pot Scraper
0.58


Snow Peak Titanium Spork
0.52


Lightload Towel
0.24


mini Bic lighter (2)
0.8


Food Bag Dry Sack




11.54


I thought that pot wasn't so bad for the weight (and price) but now I'm second-guessing myself. I'd like an uncoated titanium pot around 0.7 or 0.9L but they're so expensive. I'll be rehydrating stuff mostly and cooking a little bit. Also still trying to figure out what size food bag to get since I've heard all different suggestions.







Sawyer Squeeze Mini Filter & Syringe
2.48


Gatorade Bottle



Evernew 1L Soft Bottle



Camelback 3L Bladder
7.44


AquaMira Backup




9.92


I enjoy the convenience of drinking from a bladder but would two Gatorade bottles be enough at any time? I think that would save me some ounces.







Gregory Pack Cover
5


Vivobarefoot Ultra Pure Shoes
8.32


Victorinox Swiss Army Multitool
1.76


Princeton Tec Remix LED Headlamp
2.4


pen & journal
1.78


iPhone in Otter Box
6.84


iPod & headphones



Canon Powershot D10
7.82


phone & camera chargers
4.12


AT Guide section w/Ziploc
3.24



41.28/2.58


Currently trying to find a used iPod Nano since my iPod weighs 5.9 without a case.



UV Half Buff
0.58


pStyle
0.58


inhaler
1.02


hand sanitizer
2.42


toilet paper or baby wipes



toothbrush and toothpaste
1.5


foot balm and lip balm
1.38


sunscreen
2.18


Dr. Bronner's
2.2


razor and comb
0.24


Vitamin D & B12 Strips
0.84


tampons and liners
4.08


3 ft duct tape, ear plugs, safety pins, needle & thread, moleskin, NewSkin, gauze, pads, alcohol pads, band-aids, antibiotic ointment, and med tape
4.86


Ibuprofin, Pepto, Benadryl, Immodium, Mucinex, Sudafed, tea bags
1.69


Sea to Summit Ultra-Sil Dry Sack 4L
0.94



24.41/1.53


Total Base Weight
297.47 oz. / 18.59 lbs.



Craft Pro Warm Base Layer Bottoms
5.04


Craft Pro Warm Base Layer Top
6.24


Marmot Velox Skirt
2.24


Reebok Sports Bra
2.64


Patagonia Active Boyshorts
1.16


Darn Tough CoolMax Hike Micro Crew
2.78


Injinji Toe Socks
1.4


UV Half Buff
0.58


Salomon XA Pro 3D Ultra 2 Trail Runners
27.74


Superfeet Green Insoles
3.6


BD Trail Ergo Cork Poles
20.8



74.22/4.64



Thanks so much in advance! Oh and I was wondering if I should get some DriDucks pants or just ignore rain gear for the bottom half?

kunzman
03-17-2014, 23:36
Mountain Hardwear UltraLamina 32 is 27 oz. for regular and 29 oz. for long not 38.56.

http://www.moosejaw.com/moosejaw/shop/product_Mountain-Hardwear-UltraLamina-32-Sleeping-Bag_10207984_10208_10000001_-1_

joannaxvx
03-17-2014, 23:47
And are gaiters pretty necessary/convenient?

joannaxvx
03-17-2014, 23:59
Mountain Hardwear UltraLamina 32 is 27 oz. for regular and 29 oz. for long not 38.56.

http://www.moosejaw.com/moosejaw/shop/product_Mountain-Hardwear-UltraLamina-32-Sleeping-Bag_10207984_10208_10000001_-1_

I just realized I made a typo on that, I have the UltraLaminina. Mine is the women's model that has a manufacturer's weight of 40 oz.

Carryless
03-18-2014, 00:22
Ditch the redundant electronics. Iphone does all that. Upload photos and erase to save gig storage and carry battery booster that will give you 2 charges between electricity. May see you out there. I start approach April 16

Leanthree
03-18-2014, 01:30
downsize dr bronner to a smaller bottle, save an oz.

Add a compactor trash bag to line your pack with. Keeps out moisture that will run between your back and the pack cover.

Add 50 ft of cordage for bear hang

I'd be a bit concerned with a 32 deg bag, maybe get a liner until you are out of the smokies. You have a good safety margin with your clothing if you stick to the 32 deg bag and your later start helps, just be ready to wear every single article of clothing you have to bed a couple of nights and bring some hot drinks.

Go 2 gatorade bottles (or 1 gatorade, 1 nalgene for hot drinks). When it gets hot and if this summer is dry you can always add an extra liter.


So your list is good even if my first reaction to your equipment is it seems a bit on the bulky side (z-rest, fleece, synthetic bag vs less bulky: neo-air, down puff, down bag). This is not a problem as your bag is also a bit on the larger side as well. See what works for you but if you want to go much lighter think of ways to decrease bulk so you can eventually get a pack more in the 45 liter range. That being said, this is a pretty good setup for showing up at springer in mid april, and all the synthetics should give you a bit more warmth when things get wet.

joannaxvx
03-18-2014, 01:48
Ditch the redundant electronics. Iphone does all that. Upload photos and erase to save gig storage and carry battery booster that will give you 2 charges between electricity. May see you out there. I start approach April 16

My iPhone is only 8 gigs though so I won't be able to fit much onto it. And I think an iPod nano would hold a longer charge than an iPhone will from listening to music. I don't plan to use my phone often enough to require an extra battery booster. And I'm into photography so I want to shoot more photos and video than just with the phone. Ah very nice, I'm sure we'll cross paths at some point.

joannaxvx
03-18-2014, 01:58
downsize dr bronner to a smaller bottle, save an oz.

Add a compactor trash bag to line your pack with. Keeps out moisture that will run between your back and the pack cover.

Add 50 ft of cordage for bear hang

I'd be a bit concerned with a 32 deg bag, maybe get a liner until you are out of the smokies. You have a good safety margin with your clothing if you stick to the 32 deg bag and your later start helps, just be ready to wear every single article of clothing you have to bed a couple of nights and bring some hot drinks.

Go 2 gatorade bottles (or 1 gatorade, 1 nalgene for hot drinks). When it gets hot and if this summer is dry you can always add an extra liter.


So your list is good even if my first reaction to your equipment is it seems a bit on the bulky side (z-rest, fleece, synthetic bag vs less bulky: neo-air, down puff, down bag). This is not a problem as your bag is also a bit on the larger side as well. See what works for you but if you want to go much lighter think of ways to decrease bulk so you can eventually get a pack more in the 45 liter range. That being said, this is a pretty good setup for showing up at springer in mid april, and all the synthetics should give you a bit more warmth when things get wet.

Great tips, thanks! I did forget to mention I'll be using a compactor trash bag, just haven't gotten one yet. And the bear cord I'll get with the food bag once I figure out the size or buy a kit or something.

I was thinking that too about the sleeping bag but also figured starting later and having warm clothes will help like you mentioned. So many of those liners don't seem to provide enough warmth that they claim for the weight so I kinda ruled that out.

Sounds good on the bottles.

Yeah, it was a little tough to shed weight in a few areas since I'm vegan and don't plan on getting any gear with down in them. I appreciate all that though!

shakey_snake
03-18-2014, 02:50
Your pack and sleeping bag are pretty heavy. You could save a pound each replacing them, but yes, budgets and such. Any other suggestion is pretty insignificant in comparison as far as weight goes. Contemplating cutting off sections of the z-rest to save 2-4 oz is kinda laughable in comparison. :)

And, even as a foam user myself, I find a z-rest is pretty uncomfortable. Have you tried sleeping outside on it yet? Can you get sleep?

You have more clothes than you need. If you can't wear them all at once, then you have too many. e.g. Take one baselayer, switch to the lighter one as summer approaches. Embrace the funk--it will happen even with two base layers. You're just delaying the inevitable. :)

takethisbread
03-18-2014, 06:41
I went and shopped for a pair of the most comfortable rain pants, and made those my regular pants, I try to hike in running shorts


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

poopsy
03-18-2014, 08:22
Hi,

It's obvious that you have spent time on the list and you've got most everything covered. After all that work and think it takes guts to expose yourself on a forum like this.
Like others have said though, think about your clothing system and how it works together. Do you really need gloves and mittens when putting some socks on your hands will work? I get the gaiter thing. Bladders on a wet thru hike not so much.
If you have the money and want to drop weight the big opportunity is in your big three. You could probably lose 3 pounds there.

Poopsy

joannaxvx
03-18-2014, 12:58
Your pack and sleeping bag are pretty heavy. You could save a pound each replacing them, but yes, budgets and such. Any other suggestion is pretty insignificant in comparison as far as weight goes. Contemplating cutting off sections of the z-rest to save 2-4 oz is kinda laughable in comparison. :)

And, even as a foam user myself, I find a z-rest is pretty uncomfortable. Have you tried sleeping outside on it yet? Can you get sleep?

You have more clothes than you need. If you can't wear them all at once, then you have too many. e.g. Take one baselayer, switch to the lighter one as summer approaches. Embrace the funk--it will happen even with two base layers. You're just delaying the inevitable. :)

Yeah the pack and sleeping bag weights make me uneasy but I saw a lot of women recommending the Aura and I had a hard time finding a lighter synthetic bag without sacrificing warmth. Maybe I'll do a few quick searches.

I wasn't expecting it to be very comfortable however, I'm able to fall asleep on a hard floor so I was thinking I'll be fine. I'll have to test it out a few times. I just didn't want to have to worry about possible holes in an inflating pad and the z-rest is quick and convenient to pull out whenever. Perhaps I'll change my mind after some time on the trail.

Oh I'm not worried about funk at all. I'm worried about sitting at camp in wet clothes and sleeping in them especially when it's cold out. I know body heat can dry them up but I don't have any spare heat to give away haha thanks!

Hi,

It's obvious that you have spent time on the list and you've got most everything covered. After all that work and think it takes guts to expose yourself on a forum like this.
Like others have said though, think about your clothing system and how it works together. Do you really need gloves and mittens when putting some socks on your hands will work? I get the gaiter thing. Bladders on a wet thru hike not so much.
If you have the money and want to drop weight the big opportunity is in your big three. You could probably lose 3 pounds there.

Poopsy
Thank you so much! We all spend so much time and effort on our gear lists so I think it's nice to have a fresh pair of eyes (especially experienced ones) look at them.
I figured a pair of gloves or mittens will keep my hands warmer and drier than a pair of socks will. Then I'll still have a pair of warm, dry socks to change into at camp. The gaiter thing sounds like a luxury but I do tend to kick myself in the ankles at least once on a day hike so it could protect my socks? Yeah I think I'm gonna eliminate the bladder. And it looks like I should look into more options for a pack and sleeping bag. Thanks for the help!

shakey_snake
03-22-2014, 12:08
I wasn't expecting it to be very comfortable however, I'm able to fall asleep on a hard floor so I was thinking I'll be fine. I'll have to test it out a few times. I just didn't want to have to worry about possible holes in an inflating pad and the z-rest is quick and convenient to pull out whenever. Perhaps I'll change my mind after some time on the trail.

Well, that's a good attitude to have about it. I just know that on a lot of experienced ultralight people's gear lists the last thing they are willing to cut weight on is the sleeping pad. I've never had any problems with my ridgerest, but my wife can't fall asleep on one at all. :)

Demeter
03-22-2014, 12:59
You definitely have your gear pretty much dialed in. If you are colder by nature I would take the mittens, but ymmv.

A 3L platypus bladder weighs about the same as 2 gatorade bottles, although I like the gatorade for a hot water bottle in cold weather at night.

Have you thought about converting to a Moon Cup? Huge $ savings, and a weight savings, too.

I think gear is such a personal choice; and advice is worth what you pay for it :-)

xrayextra
03-24-2014, 01:49
Columbia Glacial Fleece III PulloverGreat choice. I loved my fleece shirts on the trail. Very lightweight and comfy warm.



Mountain Hardwear Thermostatic Jacket
10.5


Marmot Anne Wind Jacket
3.34


Mountain Hardwear Epic Rain Jacket
11.6


Thanks so much in advance! Oh and I was wondering if I should get some DriDucks pants or just ignore rain gear for the bottom half?That's a lot of jackets. Is the wind jacket water resistant? If so, dump the rain jacket and use the wind jacket instead.

I also think it's a good idea to skip the rain pants too. When you're hiking in the rain jacket/rain pants you're going to generate a LOT of sweat regardless of how well your ventilation is and as a result you'll be soaked underneath. If it's cold, they're good to have because even though you're wet, you're warm wet underneath. You may want to keep the rain jacket until the weather warms up enough where you don't need the rain clothes for insulation purposes.

I tried the rain pants and rain jacket and ended up unhappy with them, sending both home. In the end I had a poncho for constant drizzles and a windbreaker for the windy rain. I found the poncho definitely better than the rain pants/jacket but in the wind it was useless and a hassle. However, you'll be hiking mostly underneath the tree canopy and end up not worrying about getting a little wet since you'll probably be soaked from sweat anyway.

xrayextra
03-24-2014, 02:29
I'll be rehydrating stuff mostly and cooking a little bit.If you want to go cheap, try the grease pot from k-mart. It works just as good as titanium :)
Also still trying to figure out what size food bag to get since I've heard all different suggestions.I used these loc sack bags--odor proof. Bears and mice can't smell food inside. I also had a nylon laundry bag I used to put everything in when setting up my bear bags
Gatorade Bottle, Evernew 1L Soft Bottle, Camelback 3L Bladder
I enjoy the convenience of drinking from a bladder but would two Gatorade bottles be enough at any time? I think that would save me some ounces.A lot of hikers used Gatorade bottles and they work great but I preferred the platypus. I had three 1-litre platypus, using the third only in camp. I started out drinking a TON of water and usually carried two litres with me but got smarter about carrying water and rarely carried more than a litre at a time. You learn to pay closer attention to springs and streams then coordinate your water usage as you get more comfortable on the trail.
AquaMira BackupGreat choice!

Don't worry too much about your gear. So what if you have an extra pound or two when you start out. You'll figure it out as you go and send a few items home. If you find you're missing something, there are lots of outfitters and shops along the trail to fill the need.

Oh, about your camera. I wouldn't rely entirely on your iphone for pictures. The batteries don't last forever. Definitely take that canon powershot with you. I had my Samsung phone (with 2 extra batteries), an Olympus Tough TG-1 waterproof gps camera (with 2 extra batteries) and a GoPro. If you use only your iphone you may take fewer pictures being more battery conservative. I took over 6000 pictures and wish I had taken more. If I could do it again I'd take a LOT more pictures of other hikers early on. You may have just met but you'll cherish the pictures of other hikers you took early on the trip. Some you may not see again till the end of your journey, and some you may end up hiking most of the way with, but you're most certainly going to see them again. Also, scenery is nice but it's even better with people in the picture.

You're pretty well set. I envy all you hikers preparing to hit the trail. You have no idea about the incredible journey you're about to partake.

Godspeed.

joannaxvx
03-24-2014, 19:46
You definitely have your gear pretty much dialed in. If you are colder by nature I would take the mittens, but ymmv.

A 3L platypus bladder weighs about the same as 2 gatorade bottles, although I like the gatorade for a hot water bottle in cold weather at night.

Have you thought about converting to a Moon Cup? Huge $ savings, and a weight savings, too.

I think gear is such a personal choice; and advice is worth what you pay for it :-)
Yeah I think I'm gonna go with the mittens for that reason.

The bladder feels like overkill now anyway. The Gatorade bottle is fine with hot water? I was thinking of taking my .75L Nalgene bottle for that.

And yes! I actually bought a Lunette cup a few months ago to test it out a few times but unfortunately it's a little too messy for me and I still spot from it. I'm thinking I either need more practice or need to get a different brand. I wish I found it earlier in life to save money though; I know I'll definitely use it at home at least. Thank you for the tips!

Great choice. I loved my fleece shirts on the trail. Very lightweight and comfy warm.That's a lot of jackets. Is the wind jacket water resistant? If so, dump the rain jacket and use the wind jacket instead.

I also think it's a good idea to skip the rain pants too. When you're hiking in the rain jacket/rain pants you're going to generate a LOT of sweat regardless of how well your ventilation is and as a result you'll be soaked underneath. If it's cold, they're good to have because even though you're wet, you're warm wet underneath. You may want to keep the rain jacket until the weather warms up enough where you don't need the rain clothes for insulation purposes.

I tried the rain pants and rain jacket and ended up unhappy with them, sending both home. In the end I had a poncho for constant drizzles and a windbreaker for the windy rain. I found the poncho definitely better than the rain pants/jacket but in the wind it was useless and a hassle. However, you'll be hiking mostly underneath the tree canopy and end up not worrying about getting a little wet since you'll probably be soaked from sweat anyway.
Glad to hear that about the fleece! The wind jacket is not water resistant but do you think if I use some Revivex waterproofing spray I could make it? I figured it would help against a chilly wind on a clear day. Though I suppose the rain jacket could still do that. And yeah, I'm feeling less of a desire to have rain pants because of overheating and the fact that I'll get soaked anyway from rain or sweat like you mentioned. Thanks!

If you want to go cheap, try the grease pot from k-mart. It works just as good as titanium :)I used these loc sack bags--odor proof. Bears and mice can't smell food inside. I also had a nylon laundry bag I used to put everything in when setting up my bear bagsA lot of hikers used Gatorade bottles and they work great but I preferred the platypus. I had three 1-litre platypus, using the third only in camp. I started out drinking a TON of water and usually carried two litres with me but got smarter about carrying water and rarely carried more than a litre at a time. You learn to pay closer attention to springs and streams then coordinate your water usage as you get more comfortable on the trail.Great choice!

Don't worry too much about your gear. So what if you have an extra pound or two when you start out. You'll figure it out as you go and send a few items home. If you find you're missing something, there are lots of outfitters and shops along the trail to fill the need.

Oh, about your camera. I wouldn't rely entirely on your iphone for pictures. The batteries don't last forever. Definitely take that canon powershot with you. I had my Samsung phone (with 2 extra batteries), an Olympus Tough TG-1 waterproof gps camera (with 2 extra batteries) and a GoPro. If you use only your iphone you may take fewer pictures being more battery conservative. I took over 6000 pictures and wish I had taken more. If I could do it again I'd take a LOT more pictures of other hikers early on. You may have just met but you'll cherish the pictures of other hikers you took early on the trip. Some you may not see again till the end of your journey, and some you may end up hiking most of the way with, but you're most certainly going to see them again. Also, scenery is nice but it's even better with people in the picture.

You're pretty well set. I envy all you hikers preparing to hit the trail. You have no idea about the incredible journey you're about to partake.

Godspeed.
I was actually just looking into those grease pots a few minutes ago!

Great tips about the water supply. I feel like I would've started out doing the same thing if I haven't read a couple accounts of what people like you have done - having more awareness of water supply and carrying less at any point in time.

Thank you for that; I'm coming to terms with just accepting what I've chosen so far and seeing how it works for me. A friend of mine is meeting up with me after a week and a half or so which should be enough time to see how I feel about what I have so I can send things back with him if need be.

Yeah, it's no question that I'll be taking my camera with me too. I don't plan to use my phone for too much anyway and because of that I'm not bringing an extra charger for it. So I know my camera will get more use. That is some of the best advice I've heard though and I really appreciate it! That's a lot of photos but I always feel the same way after road trips I've taken. You want to solidify as many of those memories as you can. I will definitely do just that!

Many thanks =]

xrayextra
03-26-2014, 02:04
Forgot to check about your shoes. They're the most important gear you'll have. Do they fit properly? On a 45 incline facing downhill your toes should be free enough to "play the piano." I had poor fitting boots that caused my feet to ache terribly after three or four miles of hiking. I replaced them 100 miles in at Outdoor 76 in Franklin, NC (can't say enough good things about that place for shoes). It took them two hours to fit me to a proper boot (my feet are oddly shaped), but after that I had no trouble with my feet. They're foot specialists.

If your shoes are a little too tight, you'll get blisters. If they're too loose fitting, you'll get blisters.

Good luck!

p.s. do you plan to do an online journal like at trailjournals.com? (I'm Flatfoot there btw).

joannaxvx
03-27-2014, 16:26
Forgot to check about your shoes. They're the most important gear you'll have. Do they fit properly? On a 45 incline facing downhill your toes should be free enough to "play the piano." I had poor fitting boots that caused my feet to ache terribly after three or four miles of hiking. I replaced them 100 miles in at Outdoor 76 in Franklin, NC (can't say enough good things about that place for shoes). It took them two hours to fit me to a proper boot (my feet are oddly shaped), but after that I had no trouble with my feet. They're foot specialists.

If your shoes are a little too tight, you'll get blisters. If they're too loose fitting, you'll get blisters.

Good luck!

p.s. do you plan to do an online journal like at trailjournals.com? (I'm Flatfoot there btw).
Ah that's great to hear about them if I do have issues, thanks. Yeah, I ordered 10.5 and 11 and tried them both on first with the sock set up and the 10.5 were perfect for just any day (that's my usual size, sometimes 10 depending on the brand) but to account for swelling and because I felt like I needed a liiittle more width up front, I went with the 11s. I've hiked with them a couple times so far with superfeet in and they've been good. Time will tell. And yes, I do plan on setting up an account on trailjournals soon before I go. I'll post it here when I get that together and I'll check yours out, thanks again!