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MartyT
05-24-2014, 22:18
We recently purchased a Marmot Astral 2P tent with a rain fly & footprint. Our first two nights on the trail (from Davenport Gap to Hot Springs), we were pleased with the tent: it weighs less than 5 lbs. & is roomy enough for me & my husband. However, on night three (two nights ago if any of you were near Garenflo Gap then), the skies opened up & we received a hard rain for several hours. We knew that we would experience condensation & that the inside walls of our tent would be wet to the touch; however, what we didn't expect was the mist that seemed to settle all around us, causing the tops of our sleeping bags to be wet, along with anything else that was exposed in the tent. In addition, when the sudden rains caused run-off under our tent, our floor was wet--not puddles, or course, but we definitely would have been wet if we had not had sleeping pads between the floor & our sleeping bags. Is all of this normal? We were expecting more protection from our rain fly cover. Were we expecting too much? I can't imagine how wet we would have eventually gotten had it rained all night instead of just two or three hours!

canoe
05-24-2014, 22:24
I want my tent to be pretty close to 100per cent dry. There are other materials that are 100per cent dry. No misting. If it was coming down hard you can expect some misting. With sil nylon there is no getting around it.

canoe
05-24-2014, 22:25
on the other hand cuben is 100percent dry

zelph
05-24-2014, 22:29
All new tents are recommended that the new owners seal the seams. I recommend spraying the fabric with a recommended water repellant to insure the driest of dry experiences;).

Franco
05-24-2014, 22:42
First you need to establish if misting was from penetration or was condensation on the underside of the fly dislodged by the rain .
If by penetration , you may need to use a waterproofing spray sutch as the Atsko Silicone Water Guard (Outdoor and boating supply stores)
If it was mist from condensation, then you need to increase (if possible) the air flow, so unzipping part of the vestibule and maybe in your tent you could add some tie out loops so that you can seoarate the fly from the inner a bit more to let air in all around.

canoe
05-24-2014, 22:58
condensation from the fly would be dripping not misting. But still it could be condensation with water coming from the top and from under the tent, warm air in the middle.

rafe
05-24-2014, 23:39
I have had a several double-wall tents that were 100% dry, even in torrential downpours.

My Tarptent Rainbow has the misting problem. As far as I can tell, it's condensation that then gets knocked off the inside surfaces by the impact of heavy rain.

ChinMusic
05-24-2014, 23:45
Site selection is very important. If you set up on grass near a water source in humid weather, you are asking for it. If you set up where rain water will run, you are asking for it.

That said, most tents will have some issue under bad conditions. Have a camp towel (ShamWow like) at the ready for drying out the inside of the tent.

brotheral
05-25-2014, 04:56
I believe this is a good quality tent & seams are factory sealed. Also has alot of screen mesh, so ventilation shouldn't be a big problem. My question is was it staked out & pitched tightly ? :-?

MartyT
05-25-2014, 16:13
We did not think about treating it with a water repellent before we left; I guess we just assumed the factory waterproofing would be effective. We will not make that assumption before the next trip! The condensation getting knocked off by a heavy rain could certainly be the issue because the rain seemed to be falling by the bucketful. The towel is a good idea, too. Brotheral, we did stake out the tent & pitch it as tightly as we knew how. Thanks for all the input, everyone!

Tuckahoe
05-25-2014, 16:34
How waterproof the fabric of the fabrics used in a tent is actually measured as the hydrostatic head. The British Ministry of Defense considers 1000mm to be "waterproof." But you will see tents with higher ratings. For example Lightheart Gear's Solo tent isnusing fabric with a hydrostatic heard of 3500mm. This link is a decent starting point for understanding hydrostatic head -- http://www.outdoorsmagic.com/qna/qna.asp?uqn=244&P=56&SP=&V=4

It may also help to understand the causes of condensation on tents -- http://johncwalton.com/WindowOutdoors/Dew%20Frost%20Condensation%20and%20Radiation.htm

HeartFire
05-25-2014, 17:28
This tent should not need any extra treatment prior to use - I just checked the website, The fly has an 1800 mm HH with a silicone and PU coating, the floor is pu coated and rated to 3000mm. It is seam taped, so should not need additional seam sealing.

So, why did it leak? or did it leak? was it so foggy everywhere that you had fog inside the tent? sometimes, some moisture is unavoidable, and site selection is critical. setting up on dirt under trees is better than in a grassy meadow where dew will form. Condensation will form on the underside of the fly, but it really shouldn't drip into the tent through the mesh.

If the tent is indeed leaking - I would return it, they have a lifetime guarantee.

zelph
05-25-2014, 17:48
A quote from Franco Darioli at backpackinglight.com (tarptent mfg.)

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=30255

For some reason there is this close association in the forums between "Tarptent " and "seam sealing". In reality many brands have or are selling tents that need to be sealed by the consumer.
Here is a partial list :Bibler,Black Diamond ,Macpac, Integral Design,Eureka,Golite, Terra Nova, Lightwave, Nemo, MSR (they send you a tube with some tarps if you have problems..) and of course all of the cottage manufacturers that use silnylon , cuben or spinnaker .
Reading many threads it is clear that some tents that are taped also need at least a touch up in certain areas. All you need to do is Google seam sealing and a brand and chances are that someone will post about having had do do theirs, usually as a "repair" on a leaky tent.
Adding a PU coating on the underside allows silnylon to be taped but that has problems as well as Stephenson's Warmlite point out :
"Seam sealing (which we let you do, or offer as a service) is done with silicone adhesive we supply, (use for repairs if ever needed). The finish is extremely slippery, thus stays clean and wears far better than urethane coatings usually used on tents, and doesn’t turn sticky from damp storage as urethane coatings do"
Of course they have a biased view, nevertheless what they state can and does happen.
On the other hand at least Tarptent (and me soon) and SMD offer that service for a relatively modest fee.
This is obviously not possible for ,say, the like of Eureka with 500-1000 tents made in one single production run.
Franco,
[email protected]

Spirit Walker
05-25-2014, 17:49
It actually sounds fairly normal for a lightweight single wall tent. At least, the same type of thing has happened to me in heavy rains. There's a reason many people use ground cloths to keep water from coming in from beneath. And yes, condensation will get knocked off onto you when it is raining hard and there may be mist coming through the tent. You shouldn't get soaked, but damp is not that unusual.

zelph
05-25-2014, 18:04
More info:

What does condensation have to do with my tent?

Through perspiration and breathing, an adult gives off about a pint of water overnight. When you sleep in a tent, this water vapor is trapped. If it cannot escape, water vapor reappears as condensation. A tent's permeable roof allows the vapor to evaporate through the roof to the outside, keeping the inside of the tent dry. The tent windows should also be left partially open at night. Cross ventilation allows excess moisture to escape, reducing condensation. Cross ventilation becomes more important in very humid or extremely cold conditions when the permeable roof is less effective.

http://www.eurekatent.com/detail.aspx?id=43#question17


SEAM SEALING:
We recommend use of a sealer such as Kenyon Seam Sealer 3 or McNett Outdoor
SeamGrip
®
.
• Work in a fully ventilated area.
• Set the tent up or lay the tent out flat. Taut seams allow for even application and
penetration of the sealer.
• Decide which seams need to be sealed. For example, seams that will be exposed
to rain, runoff, or ground level water are a must for sealing, while seams on
uncoated nylon or mesh panels don’t need treatment. There is no need to seal
the seams in the roof or the factory taped seams. We recommend sealing both
floor and fly seams and reinforcements.
• Apply sealant to the inside and outside of all exposed seams. Several thin layers
will work better than one thick layer. Read and follow manufacture's instructions.

http://store.eurekatent.com/media/document/HEADQUARTERS09IM.pdf

CONDENSATION & VENTING:
Through perspiration and breathing, an adult gives off about a pint of water
overnight. If it cannot escape, the water vapor condenses to liquid. Most
often, water found in the tent is a result of this condensation rather than
from the tent leaking. Condensation often forms where the sleeping bag
touches the side of the tent, under the sleeping pad, or on coated surfaces
such as the door flaps. A tent’s double wall construction allows the vapor to
escape through the roof to the outside, keeping the inside of the tent dry.
Leave the windows partially open at night to provide cross ventilation and
further reduce condensation. Cross ventilation becomes more important in
very humid or extremely cold conditions when the permeable roof is less
effective. The features that enhance ventilation are windows, short-sheeted
flys (bottom venting), roof vents, and High/Low venting doors. These are
specific to each tent model.
Given the importance of proper ventilation, We use High/Low venting in most
of our tents. This allows cooler air in through the low vents and warmer,
moist air up and out through the high vents. High/Low venting is
accomplished within the inner tent via roof vents, doors and windows. It is
important to vent the vestibule. Unvented, it can inhibit airflow into the tent.
Our tent vestibules profit from the ability to “short sheet” by means of
zippers & toggles and staked vestibule pull outs create a bellowing effect.
Most of our tents are equipped with a High/Low venting door. This design
allows increased airflow into the tent from the bottom. Open the low
vent/window to admit cool air, allowing the warmer air out through the
high roof vents. When rain and wind prevent the low vent from being
opened, the high door vent can still be used. Fly overhangs or vestibules
protect it.

q-tip
05-26-2014, 13:14
I used Atsko Silicone Spray on the exterior and INTERIOR of my Tarp Tent Contrail, the internal spray definitely helped with the internal condensation in heavy persistent rain. Nothing helped with the condensation in my Wild Oasis Tarp, very disappointing....

martinb
07-14-2014, 18:24
Put Tyvek, cut to the floor size, inside the tent to help with floor wetness issues. Tent floor ratings are misleading because once weight is involved (say, your knees), that lofty hydrostatic head rating doesn't seem so good. As for the misting, looking at that tent I'm wondering about roof ventilation. You need it, especially in the rain. I ran into a similar situation in a poorly roof-vented tent from a name-brand tent maker. The thing was sealed but after a heavy, cold downpour on a warm day all kinds of condensation ensued. Even the mist effect.

Wise Old Owl
07-14-2014, 22:24
We recently purchased a Marmot Astral 2P tent with a rain fly & footprint. Our first two nights on the trail (from Davenport Gap to Hot Springs), we were pleased with the tent: it weighs less than 5 lbs. & is roomy enough for me & my husband. However, on night three (two nights ago if any of you were near Garenflo Gap then), the skies opened up & we received a hard rain for several hours. We knew that we would experience condensation & that the inside walls of our tent would be wet to the touch; however, what we didn't expect was the mist that seemed to settle all around us, causing the tops of our sleeping bags to be wet, along with anything else that was exposed in the tent. In addition, when the sudden rains caused run-off under our tent, our floor was wet--not puddles, or course, but we definitely would have been wet if we had not had sleeping pads between the floor & our sleeping bags. Is all of this normal? We were expecting more protection from our rain fly cover. Were we expecting too much? I can't imagine how wet we would have eventually gotten had it rained all night instead of just two or three hours!

Tent Fly Fabric 40d 100% Nylon Rip Stop, Silicone/ PU 1800mm W/R, F/R

I have read here many times about the misting... and I really do wonder what is the best outcome. The tent has to breath and ever since I left my totally waterproof Andre Jamlet, these lighter tents do have some issues, and so do hammocks. I pitch my gear in the back yard, I put tissues and a plastic bowl and sometimes I go out and sleep there in a rain storm... I really do test my gear, I hate getting bad gear. Yea you need to seam seal - not because of pelting rain, because the water is wicked over to the underside where the thread is sewn. The stitches are like tiny candle wicks. Please also consider the vents are bi directional and you exhale in a semi closed environment. your warm breath hits the cold water droplets and you have a misting... I would guess there are many ways to get a misting... you are outdoors you should expects to get wet and have a plan. In Canada, it can rain for days and I have sat out several hurricanes coming up the coast here in PA.


All new tents are recommended that the new owners seal the seams. I recommend spraying the fabric with a recommended water repellant to insure the driest of dry experiences;).


Zelph I saw the other posts and I thought you were on target except this first one... I think spraying is a bad idea on a new tent. Just an opinion... I know the manufactures do lots of water pressure tests with fire hoses and garden alike... Silicone is not needed - just seam seal.

Sallymon
05-23-2015, 11:01
I have a TT Notch. And I did try to seam seal it myself. It was my first time. If for some reason it didn't take, what are the options for patching a leaky tent? Duck tape? (I'm just concerned, because I did seam seal it- too thick of a layer?. However, it's still really sticky after three days of drying inside. :( Average temp inside is 75. I live in TX.)

Patrickjd9
05-23-2015, 16:54
Sallymon, definitely not duct tape. Seam sealing takes more sealer than you'd think. You do need to fully wet the strip of doubled fabric on the fly and the floor (usually inside, sometimes inside and out) that has the sewing you can see and feel. Avoid getting seam sealer on areas away from the doubled sewn strips.

Patrickjd9
05-23-2015, 16:56
You might find a how-to on YouTube, which is an amazing repair resource.

Franco
05-23-2015, 19:44
Sallymon,
With one GE II tube of silicone (I think it is 85g) I would do 2-3 tents like the Notch by following the TT method , as explained (video) on the TT site.
Yes , often folk put too much silicone because they paint it on thick rather than diluting it (as shown in the video...) and letting the silicone penetrate the seams.
Silicone drys faster in high humidity , that also means it takes longer to dry on hot dry days.
I have had tents drying up (to the touch) in less than 6 hours to over a full day , up to almost two days in really hot weather.
you can sprinkle some talcum powder on it . (not two pounds of it....)

Sallymon
05-23-2015, 22:43
I guess I'm confused then as to why it's still sticky and what that means regarding waterproofing. Any suggestions? I used the seam seal kit TT sent. Will it always be sticky? Or is that cause it's too thick and needs A LOT more drying time?

Walkintom
05-23-2015, 22:48
I guess I'm confused then as to why it's still sticky and what that means regarding waterproofing. Any suggestions? I used the seam seal kit TT sent. Will it always be sticky? Or is that cause it's too thick and needs A LOT more drying time?

It's probably because your humidity is low and you have it inside. Low humidity = slower curing. Inside = low atmosphere exchange = slower curing.

And you probably put it on too thick as well. Eventually it will cure though.

Franco
05-23-2015, 22:54
maybe you did put it on a bit thick so in that case yes it will take longer to dry but it will.

BTW a good reason for not putting it on thick is that it can peel off done that way.
This is one of my seams to give you an idea of how I do them :
30810

Sallymon
05-23-2015, 23:10
Damn TX weather (actually we've been at 90% humidity/85F averages with lots of rain! :)). We had one freak day of 70F where I could seam seal it on my apt porch. I did my best (usually we're already in mid 90's at this point in the year). We'll see how it holds. Thanks for your help!

Rain Man
05-24-2015, 08:14
I'd expect everything to get misted wet in 100% humidity. To me, that's not a function of a tent being waterproof, since the air itself is ... "water" in that situation.

You might want to spray the tops of your sleeping bags with some DWR? Just enough so water droplets in the air won't soak in.

Bronk
05-24-2015, 09:01
If it rains you're going to get wet. If you don't want to get wet, stay home.

Franco
05-27-2015, 00:04
To me the idea was to suggest ways to minimise the chance of getting wet.
Eliminating condensation isn't possible but managing the situation is.

q-tip
05-27-2015, 09:32
Misting is an unfortunate trade off for single wall tents. In addition to seam sealing, I have applied spray silicone in/out and my tents are 100% waterproof. The great news for sil nylon is that it will completely dry in 10-15 minutes during a break. I usea polycro ground cloth (1.7 oz.) that takes cares of seepage and worse, mud.
http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/asset.php?fid=18964&uid=20935&d=1362058673
http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/asset.php?fid=15883&uid=20935&d=1340289000

rojotide
05-27-2015, 10:00
nothing is 100% waterproof while being breathable (which you need). but try some nikwax spray on your tent which sheds water

cayte03
06-15-2015, 18:21
Sallymon, definitely not duct tape. Seam sealing takes more sealer than you'd think. You do need to fully wet the strip of doubled fabric on the fly and the floor (usually inside, sometimes inside and out) that has the sewing you can see and feel. Avoid getting seam sealer on areas away from the doubled sewn strips.


Can you please explain how spraying inside helped with condensation? As far as I understand, spraying with silicone will make the fabric less breathable, so wouldn't that mean more condensation? Or do you mean the silicone just helped the condensation roll off better?

On a somewhat related note, has anyone tried using the "second wall" (the clip in liner) on their Tarptent? I have the Rainbow and major condensation issues, so I've been considering getting it - the extra 4 oz might be worth it.

Franco
06-15-2015, 19:03
"On a somewhat related note, has anyone tried using the "second wall" (the clip in liner) on their Tarptent? I have the Rainbow and major condensation issues, so I've been considering getting it - the extra 4 oz might be worth it."
The liner will not reduce condensation it will help you not to brush against a wet fly.
I first installed one in my Moment (old version) then after a few trips I decided that I just prefered wiping the wall down if needed so never bothered after that.
The curtain does help a bit with warmth and to reduce heat from the sun if by any chance you have an afternoon nap.
BTW, I posted this many times.
If, when you get up in the morning, after a non rainy night , the grass is wet, the tent fly (over and under) will be wet irrespective if it is a single or double wall tent.
Any brand, any fabric.

Franco
06-15-2015, 19:15
BTW, for the ones that like to wake up to a wet tent, this is the classic spot where you have a very good chance to get your wish :
30985
I have done that several times (because of views or whatever..) but yes it is a great spot for condensation .
Just 10 feet or so above that riverside level will make the difference.

thecyclops
06-15-2015, 21:09
+100 on the ATSKO Silicone Water Guard,the stuff is amazing.
I actually stopped seam sealing my tents every year with reg "paint on"stuff and just soak the fly and all the seams of the body with it....no issues.
Wal-mart about $5.

Singto
06-16-2015, 07:22
With as much research, science and trail testing that takes place we should be able to become comfortable with the fact that there's only so much we can do to overcome/manage the effects of mother nature on us and our equipment. Do the prudent things (seam seal, ground cloth, maximize ventilation, site selection) and live with the results. There's nothing wrong with taking a small chamois or PVA towel to do an occasional wipe down of your tent in extreme conditions. Most of the time it probably won't be needed.

Namtrag
06-16-2015, 11:10
the maddening thing is the inconsistency of when and when we don't get condensation....common wisdom is that you camp high, away from water. Last trip, when we camped right next to a river, down in a valley, we got zero condensation...then next night we camped up on a ridge, far from water, and had condensation. You just never know!

Franco
06-17-2015, 00:52
"Last trip, when we camped right next to a river, down in a valley, we got zero condensation...then next night we camped up on a ridge, far from water, and had condensation."
That is a very good example of why people should not take too much note of first time use reviews.
Reminds me of these two comments I spotted a couple of years ago about the same tent, on different forums, within a day or two of each other
"bone dry, no condensation whatsoever"
"a condensation machine"
Both comments probably correct , different place , different time...

greensleep
11-23-2015, 19:26
cuben fiber!

Tipi Walter
11-23-2015, 21:41
If it rains you're going to get wet. If you don't want to get wet, stay home.

This is just untrue. If it were true I would have been dead a long time ago in nonstop butt cold 35F rains. I may get wet but we're not talking about a single human body getting wet, we're talking about a tent and the inside of a tent getting wet and our gear getting wet. It just doesn't happen with careful planning.


Misting is an unfortunate trade off for single wall tents.

So don't use single wall tents and don't use tents with an inner made of mesh. Problem 85% solved. What's more important, a lighter weight shelter or staying dry?




If, when you get up in the morning, after a non rainy night , the grass is wet, the tent fly (over and under) will be wet irrespective if it is a single or double wall tent.
Any brand, any fabric.



True, but when you have a decent full canopy inner tent with no mesh this water attached to the inside of the tent fly is of no consequence. My silnylon tent fly is drenched with condensation at times and in the vestibule in a hard rain I can feel little drops of misting rain hit me from the vestibule fly. Thing is, none of this misting reaches me thru the tent canopy and definitely none of it reaches my gear.


the maddening thing is the inconsistency of when and when we don't get condensation....common wisdom is that you camp high, away from water. Last trip, when we camped right next to a river, down in a valley, we got zero condensation...then next night we camped up on a ridge, far from water, and had condensation. You just never know!

You do not even need a human body inside to produce condensation. I left a tent up in an open meadow all night empty and in the morning the inside of the fly was saturated.

A good tent, a well made tent, will not leak and will not compromise any of your gear except in the most narrow of circumstances: i.e. a sleet or snowstorm with saturated air and cold temps whereby you sit put in hunker mode for a day or even for 3 or 4 days and don't take down the tent. THEN the inner canopy walls can get either wet with condensation droplets or icy with a film of frozen condensation. It helps to pack up every day and allow the tent to be rolled up and set up after a day's hiking. Then all the canopy water or ice will be dislodged and you can either sponge it out or sweep out the ice. If it's bad enough you could end up with a liter or ice crystals in a wad on the tent floor.

Otherwise a good 4 season tent will not leak, period. It will have a fly hydrostatic head of at least 3000mm and a floor of at least 7000mm. These numbers are important.

I love all the answers so far on this thread:

** Use cuben as it's 100% dry. What, cuben never has condensation??
** Seal the seams. Misting is not a seam problem, that's an actual leakage problem.
** Spray floor with water repellent---not needed on a decent tent.
** If water penetrates tent fly you need a waterproofing spray. Not on a decent silnylon or urethane poly fly.

** Increase air flow---but often in the worst rainstorms no part of the tent fly can be opened.
** Better site selection---this is always the answer from folks using substandard equipment. A good 4 season tent can handle ground water or horizontal 60mph rain or blizzards---anything short of a falling tree, a lightning strike or a tornado.

** Use a rag to dry out the tent or dry off the tent fly. Don't need it with a double wall tent except in those rare cold conditions as mentioned above.

And I agree with Martinb---put your ground cloth inside the tent. If it rains hard enough in the mountains of TN or Georgia or NC you will on occasion get ground water and lake effect. A good tent floor with you sitting on it will not allow water to seep thru. A 3000mm floor is not enough.

MuddyWaters
11-23-2015, 22:13
Cuben has condensation for sure. It tends to be a wet film. It runs down canopy to edge readily and doesnt seeem to form big drops like some fabric flys do. It still mists in hard rain too.

I had a minor leak above face once where an attachment point was sewn and the seal patch over inside had a tiny wrinkle. During severral hours of heavy rain one afternoon, i watched a steady rivulet of water run down canopy inches from my face. Never dripped.

Jim Adams
11-24-2015, 08:38
I have a Kelty Votex / Gunnison 2 that weighs in at 5lbs. and it is totally dry in ANY storm or situation. It does have condensation but none that drips or enters the tent body. I had it in a 4 day rain in Canada and not a drop. A little heavy for backpacking but not bad if you split the weight...worth every bit of dryness. A light tent does you no good I you are carrying 2 pounds of water in your sleeping bag.

Lyle
11-24-2015, 10:04
Few, if any, tents are 100% dry, 100% of the time, or even a majority of the time. I say that from going on 40 years of backpacking experience with many types of tents.

All decent tents will keep the vast majority of precipitation off of you the vast majority of the time.

You do need to incorporate a few other tricks along the way:
- seam sealing as already discussed
- Make your camp in an appropriate area to reduce moisture.
- I find a ground cloth under the tent extremely beneficial - if used properly.
- Make sure you stay on your sleeping pad for the reason you have already learned.
- Electronics go into plastic bags - even inside the tent.
- Keep away from the walls of the tent as much as possible.
- Try to lay so that your mouth is near a ventilation point. If you breath right onto a solid tent wall, you will increase condensation tremendously.
- Most modern sleeping bags have water resistant shells, so this helps tremendously - look for that when buying a new bag.
- Sleeping bags will still accumulate moisture from both inside and outside during a trip - incorporate drying time for your bag during every trip. Laundry or hanging on a sunny, breezy day.
- Contrary to what you often hear, do not sleep with or place wet clothing under your bag at night - think about it, where does that moisture go as it dries the clothes? Best to dry clothing by hanging or wearing them dry the next day.
- Keep clothing you do not want to get damp off the floor and covered by something less crucial while in the tent.

Any thing listed above need more clarification, just ask.

Camping is a series of compromises, you find what works "best" for you, not necessarily perfect - that is a VERY elusive standard that will most likely drive you nuts.

Deacon
11-24-2015, 11:49
** Use cuben as it's 100% dry. What, cuben never has condensation?

Many good points made here. Specifically speaking about condensation, I have never experienced condensation in my ZPacks Duplex tent, a single wall cuben. Absolutely waterproof. Granted it is not a 4 season tent, but I attribute this to the open mesh at the bottom all the way around.

MtDoraDave
04-20-2016, 07:29
I realize this is an old thread, but what the heck. People, like me, can scroll through old threads and learn from what has already been discussed.

I bought a TarpTent Squall 2 because a) I like to spread stuff out next to me inside a tent and b) I may have a a g/f join me on a hike.

It does get condensation inside - which wipes out pretty easily or dries out quickly in good afternoon sunny weather. It has mesh all the way around... but still gets condensation with the beak / vestibule velcro'd shut.

Once, during a rain, I noticed the rain ran down the mesh on one side of the tent and made its way inside to the floor. Not a disaster, I just soaked it up with my bandana. After that trip, I emailed TarpTent, and asked if it would be a better idea to attach the screen a half inch back from the edge of the tent so the silnylon can act as a drip edge.
Henry personally responded to my email and said that if I lower the trekking poles down to 115, or perhaps lower, that it wouldn't do that. (he was more tactful and polite) ... how did he know I stretch my poles out to make the entrance taller??? Perhaps not his first day on the job ;)

Since then, I have been lowering my trekking poles to the suggested height, and the screen/mesh is usually tucked under like it's supposed to be. There are still some times when I have to pitch on an uneven surface that some of the mesh sticks out one of the sides - but I imagine I could tweak the pitch of the tent if rain was expected to fix it.

I did order the seam sealing kit from them when I ordered the tent, and only seam sealed the inside. No leaky seams.

A ground cover probably extends the life of the floor - but it's also great for keeping mud off the bottom of the tent - which is difficult/ messy to try to clean off in the morning when getting ready to hit the trail.

Franco
04-20-2016, 18:18
Sometime the difference between a tent working well or not has to do with small details that tend to be very obvious to some but not others.
Generally I suggest to try to match as close as possible the official set up so that your tent does look pretty much exactly the same as the one on the official photos.
Still there have been several occasions when customers or users of other brands were convinced they were doing it right only to have their photos proving otherwise.
(BTW, for some reasons we only had 3 photos of the Squall 2 and not all that clear about how the floor should sit. The new version , Mo Trail, has now 11 photos, plus 2 3D videos and a set up video. Maybe we learned something too)
[email protected]

jaxonjesse
01-29-2018, 03:33
In case of leakage on the fabric, you can apply waterproofing spray for sealing leakages. Spray the entire surface of leakage. Allow it to adhere to the fabric material. Silicon spray is considered as the best water proof spray due to its water-resistant characteristics. It also has a moisturizing property. Silicone spray waterproofing provides the ideal way of coating fabrics. It helps the rainwater to roll off the material without soaking. You can use tent seam sealant like this (https://thehumannest.com/how-to-weather-proof-a-tent/) to fix leaking seams. Most of the modern tents come with tent seam tape. If you have one of such tents for camping, it decreases the effort of sealing to a great extent.

rocketsocks
01-29-2018, 03:43
I’ll go with “water tight as a frogs sphincter”