PDA

View Full Version : compression socks



squeezebox
08-04-2014, 05:32
Lately I've seen several runners with these high tech compression socks. I looked them up at Sports authority.
They sound very worth while for hikers, calf support, less calf fatigue. some with ankle support. no weights reported.
and they would function as sock liners $20 - $50
I was planning on bringing a pair of elastic knee highs. You know those ugly beige knee socks old ladies wear.
I think the things for runners would be better.

squeezebox
08-04-2014, 06:07
Some are above the knee, for knee support, some have knee pads for knee abrasion protection.

Praha4
08-04-2014, 09:29
I started using the Zensah calf compression sleeves last year on all hikes, they are well worth the money. http://www.zensah.com/men/men-leg-sleeves/compression-leg-sleeves.html

88BlueGT
08-04-2014, 09:34
I started using the Zensah calf compression sleeves last year on all hikes, they are well worth the money. http://www.zensah.com/men/men-leg-sleeves/compression-leg-sleeves.html

Do you know the weight on these?

Praha4
08-04-2014, 10:05
just weighed them, the Zensah S/M sleeves are 1.0 oz/each
Do you know the weight on these?

squeezebox
08-04-2014, 10:54
What do you think ? socks or sleeves?

Dogwood
08-04-2014, 12:52
I started using the Zensah calf compression sleeves last year on all hikes, they are well worth the money. http://www.zensah.com/men/men-leg-sleeves/compression-leg-sleeves.html

I have a set of these too that I have available mainly to help with shin splints if the need arises.

Kerosene
08-04-2014, 14:48
I'd go with the sleeves. That way you can use them regardless of how which hiking socks you're wearing.

Praha4
08-04-2014, 15:49
I agree with Kerosene. Get the sleeves for the calves, that still lets you pick whatever socks you want. I've never had a problem with shin splints after I started using the Zensahs.

Pedaling Fool
08-04-2014, 19:27
Unless you have a medical condition I wouldn't waste my money on these things. I've also seen runners use them, including the professionals, but not many, because if you properly build up your body you don't need these thing; futhermore, they can be counterproductive, because they can weaken the muscles (in the long run) that don't have to work as hard when they are worn. Sort of like taking testosterone, the stuff helps you in the short term but hurts you (really bad) in the long run.

Of the professional runners that wear them, there may be a few that have a medical conditon requiring their use, but I wouldn't be surprised if many of them are just looking for that little edge to win the race, but otherwise wouldn't wear them.

BTW, there is a muscle in you calf muscles that is commonly referred to as you second heart http://m.runnersworld.com/injury-prevention-recovery/soleus-strength

squeezebox
08-04-2014, 21:51
I'm old, fat, and out of shape. Does that count as a medical condition?

Praha4
08-04-2014, 22:58
I'll try to just ignore Pedaling Fool basically calling me out as some kind of wimp or sucker for using calf compressions sleeves. I've been a long distance runner since high school, and backpacking for many years. I think I know a little bit about training and physical therapy for hiking injuries, including shin splints. And I can say that I've done many AT hikes without the Zensahs, and many AT and LT hikes with the Zensahs, and the Zensah calf compression sleeves definitely helped me avoid shin splints. And I spend months training for these hikes. I would say these calf compression sleeves fall into a similar category of support gear as orthotic inserts for your shoes. Of course hikers should train and try to build up their bodies, but that does not rule out using these type items to help recovery and avoid injury. And I would also say it is absolutely silly to say that calf compression sleeves weaken the leg muscles because you don't have to work as hard. That's like saying hiking with a lighter pack is counterproductive because it weakens our muscles.....so I guess pedaling fool thinks we should all hike with heavier packs in order to prove how tough you are? My advice is try hiking with them and without them and decide for yourself. Regards.
Unless you have a medical condition I wouldn't waste my money on these things. I've also seen runners use them, including the professionals, but not many, because if you properly build up your body you don't need these thing; futhermore, they can be counterproductive, because they can weaken the muscles (in the long run) that don't have to work as hard when they are worn. Sort of like taking testosterone, the stuff helps you in the short term but hurts you (really bad) in the long run.

Of the professional runners that wear them, there may be a few that have a medical conditon requiring their use, but I wouldn't be surprised if many of them are just looking for that little edge to win the race, but otherwise wouldn't wear them.

BTW, there is a muscle in you calf muscles that is commonly referred to as you second heart http://m.runnersworld.com/injury-prevention-recovery/soleus-strength

Wise Old Owl
08-04-2014, 23:38
Unless you have a medical condition I wouldn't waste my money on these things. I've also seen runners use them, including the professionals, but not many, because if you properly build up your body you don't need these thing; futhermore, they can be counterproductive, because they can weaken the muscles (in the long run) that don't have to work as hard when they are worn. Sort of like taking testosterone, the stuff helps you in the short term but hurts you (really bad) in the long run.

Of the professional runners that wear them, there may be a few that have a medical conditon requiring their use, but I wouldn't be surprised if many of them are just looking for that little edge to win the race, but otherwise wouldn't wear them.

BTW, there is a muscle in you calf muscles that is commonly referred to as you second heart http://m.runnersworld.com/injury-prevention-recovery/soleus-strength

odd - I too was a long distance runner, bicyclist in HS and avid backpacker... but standing on a concrete sales floor for years took some toll. A lot of the men used these socks for edema or better control, I think they add some comfort... so I am curious, could you expand on your thoughts?

Elder
08-04-2014, 23:41
Rocky makes a merino wool blend compression sock. Sold seasonally (hunting) at Wally World. $18.95?
I like them a lot.

Wise Old Owl
08-04-2014, 23:50
Yes I have them - but Rugby the dog loves to chew on them.... they don't last much... going to have to work on that... I have several mismatched pairs now...

McPick
08-05-2014, 00:15
I started using the Zensah calf compression sleeves last year on all hikes, they are well worth the money. http://www.zensah.com/men/men-leg-sleeves/compression-leg-sleeves.html

I hadn't heard of these prior to reading this post. In 2006, my dreams of completing an AT thru hike were dashed by severe shin splints. I honestly believe that these injuries occurred on the long, paved downhill just outside of Blanding. I managed to hobble into Pearisburg, but it took me 4 weeks of rest and healing to get back on the trail. (I completed all but the Hanover to Monson leg that year and came back to finish in 2008.)

I tried everything to protect my shins from further injury, including winding Ace bandages around my legs. Some days I'd wrap them one direction, others, I reversed the direction of the wrap. The compression helped a lot.

One day in PA, I was restocking supplies at a large grocery store. While there I looked for new Ace bandages. That's when I discovered the Ace ankle compression tube. You've all seen it. You slip it over your foot and pull it part way up over your ankle. It's got a hole in the tube for your heal. The part around the foot is shorter and the ankle part is longer. I bought two.

They were a bit tight at first, when I pulled them completely up and over my shins and calves. I put the heal holes on the backs of my calves to give them a bit more room. Plus, I realized that by not pulling them up as high as my knee, the lower, shorter section offered me additional ankle support.

The difference in my shins was amazing. I took them with me on the CT in 2009. I believe I was starting my second day when I began descending the west side of section 1. I felt that old familiar twinge in my right shin. I immediately stopped, took off my boots and pulled my ankle tubes up over my shins and calves. Since wearing them, I have not suffered from shin splints again.

I'm going to purchase a pair of these sleeves to determine how they compare to the ankle brace tubes I've been using for the same purpose. I don't care what other think about these compression sleeves. I don't care if others think hikers should or shouldn't use hiking poles, or wear trail runners or boots, or use aqua mira or filters, or any of the dozens of other topics that are argued on WB. I'm 62. Also getting older and fatter from sitting behind a desk. I miss the trail every day. If any of these or other products will help me stay on the trail a bit longer in my lifetime, them I'm gonna use them.

Thanks to Squeeze and Pra!

PS... I have no idea what the "long run" might be for me, so will somebody please pass the testosterone?

Dogwood
08-05-2014, 00:45
The other two side benefits I've happily taken notice of while wearing calf compression sleeves is that they add to my warmth and help protect my shins from getting badly scratched and mutilated on hikes where I'm pushing through briars, etc. but still want to hike in running shorts. Convertibles or simply pants don't provide the same overall balance of versatility and benefits as the running shorts/calf compression sleeve combination.

And, in case you're ever crazy enough to do a hike like this on Dec 31 through frozen Buckskin Gulch/Paria River the compression sleeves by themselves or over thermal bottoms or under Schoeller fabric pants, like my hiking companion Walkie Talkie wore that day, will help protect your shins while breaking through and hiking through the floating sheets of ice. Of course he made his own compression sleeves by cutting off the legs of an old 2 mmm Neoprene wet suit. I thought he had a great idea. I wore the Schoeller fabric pants and my shins were bruised and slashed from the ice by the end of the first day. I was relatively clean though. He was full of frozen mud.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=743xGGcXvb0

Pedaling Fool
08-05-2014, 08:27
Sorry you all, I just noticed I was in the old broke dick forum:D:)

Sounds like many of you all may have the requisite medical issues, but I would argue that there's a better remedy to that than compression socks...

If you see in these links some think they may not even help at all, but then again I don't have any experience with them, so I'll just leave a couple more links and butt out of this old fart forum;)



http://www.livestrong.com/article/326524-can-i-exercise-wearing-compression-stockings/

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/08/080820163107.htm

Elder
08-05-2014, 10:06
Get off the grass you young , punk, whippersnapper! It ain't broke! Just worn down!

Traveler
08-05-2014, 10:11
Age, experience, and cunning will beat the snot out of youth and enthusiasm 9 out of 10 times...

Lemko
08-05-2014, 21:30
touche, Elder, AT Traveler, McPick! Whatever it takes for this old fart to stay on the trail, is all that I care about. Don't need to be a superstar to endure and maximize my enjoyment on the road. Preventing edema and blood pooling is a good plan to keep them puppies plodding along. Also the white socks let you see ticks easier. Lyme disease will quickly neutralize all these arguments!

Lemko
08-05-2014, 21:32
oh and i don't need a dick, either :)

Broken Butterfly
08-05-2014, 21:42
It will help with circulation and decrease edema if that is a problem. I thought it was a great idea.

Dogwood
08-05-2014, 22:49
PF, I'm not an old old broke dick yet. I'm still a dancin banana. :bananaHowever, I was somewhat ignorant of what caused shin splints and how to PREVENT them through quite a few yrs of largely or only treating the symptoms while engaging in various sports(basketball, tennis, running, high impact aerobics) and backpacking. Incorporating calf compression sleeves, and more importantly reducing my ignorance on how to prevent shin splints in the first place, factored into a combined approach that enabled me to finish my PCT hike which had me sidelined less than 250 miles from finishing at the northern terminus. Since that time I have fewer incidences with shin splints but I do feel less fatigued in my calves at the end of day when I wear the calf compression sleeves on high mileage backpacking days especially if going steeply down hill often or when extensively going down steps even when not having shin splint issues.

McPick
08-05-2014, 23:40
PF, I'm not an old old broke dick yet. I'm still a dancin banana.

You, you, you... Braggart!

rocketsocks
08-06-2014, 00:21
my rocket has died
gravity has won
it use to fly straight
straight towards the sun

now it points down
towards to ground and the rocks
so I keep it tucked in
tucked in my one sock

I've been avoiding not only this thread, but these socks/sleeves. I hate wearin' anything over my calf (except loose fitting gaiters) and was likely the one who started the whole men wearing tennis socks back in the 70's...yeah that was me, tore the little pom poms off too, didn't matter, still got laughed at...don't care, never did. Unfortunately I've had bouts of Edemia that last few years, and will likely end up in a pair of these...@#%&...Balls! but it's better than throwing' a clot and droolin' outta the side of my face while tryin' to tell a joke...So, whatta ya gonna do.

I also started socks with sandals, yep that was me...so freakin' comfortable. :)

Siarl
08-06-2014, 01:54
I have peripheral neuropathy, which means that the nerves in my lower extremities, my legs, no longer work properly. The sheath covering the nerve is gone. This can effect anything from proper circulation, sensation, or edema (due to poor circulation) etc. At first I purchased a medical pair of compression socks but they didn't feel good and they wore out shortly after purchase. So I purchased 6 pairs of just good ol' white Gold Toe brand knees socks. I absolutely love them and would purchase more of them in the future. It doesn't matter since it's the same symptoms but my peripheral neuropathy was acquired as a side effect from taking a medication for my Crohn's. These socks work just as well as a pair of compression socks and they look like plain pair of athletic socks. I've been wondering how that's going to look on the trail but again, that doesn't matter to me, I refuse to wear shorts. The socks are cotton and polyester but I have found that REI, Outdoor and Amazon have compression socks made from merino wool and they are not a bad price either. I'm going to purchase those but I am not ready for those yet. Just an idea that I wanted to throw out there.

rocketsocks
08-06-2014, 02:40
I have peripheral neuropathy, which means that the nerves in my lower extremities, my legs, no longer work properly. The sheath covering the nerve is gone. This can effect anything from proper circulation, sensation, or edema (due to poor circulation) etc. At first I purchased a medical pair of compression socks but they didn't feel good and they wore out shortly after purchase. So I purchased 6 pairs of just good ol' white Gold Toe brand knees socks. I absolutely love them and would purchase more of them in the future. It doesn't matter since it's the same symptoms but my peripheral neuropathy was acquired as a side effect from taking a medication for my Crohn's. These socks work just as well as a pair of compression socks and they look like plain pair of athletic socks. I've been wondering how that's going to look on the trail but again, that doesn't matter to me, I refuse to wear shorts. The socks are cotton and polyester but I have found that REI, Outdoor and Amazon have compression socks made from merino wool and they are not a bad price either. I'm going to purchase those but I am not ready for those yet. Just an idea that I wanted to throw out there.
...and a good idea at that, thanks. I'm pretty picky about the socks I wear, and am leaning towards those sleeve things...should it come to that, but have one problem butchering a sock to get the uppers. Interesting, my condition may be from taking a med as well, sucks don't it! fix one thing, break another...sheeesh

rocketsocks
08-06-2014, 02:42
...and a good idea at that, thanks. I'm pretty picky about the socks I wear, and am leaning towards those sleeve things...should it come to that, but have No problem butchering a sock to get the uppers. Interesting, my condition may be from taking a med as well, sucks don't it! fix one thing, break another...sheeeshNo problem...not one problem.

FlyFishNut
08-06-2014, 07:01
Not a broke dick here (yet), but at 45 I have injuries that pop up - does anyone else have a drawer of tendonitis straps, heel cups, other misc braces? Damnnnn

Anyway - I have compression socks for calf recovery after soccer or trail running. These help a ton!! I'm too cool to actually wear them in public though....it would probably help if I did... Get them!!

2015 Lady Thru-Hiker
08-06-2014, 08:17
As a nurse working on her feet for up to 20 hour a day, compression socks were my saving grace. Not only for my legs but my feet as well. Hadn't thought about wearing them on the trail until I saw this but I am definitely going to get a couple of pairs to take with me. Like Dogwood said, anything that will help keep me on the trail a bit longer.

Just Bill
08-06-2014, 10:04
Well PF, I'm with you on your argument, but not your conclusion.
Argument- Train your way out of injuries, don't use supportive or corrective devices as a crutch. Do your best to heal your body on your own.
Conclusion- When it's go time- use any reasonable thing you can get your hands on to make your trip enjoyable.

Florida Mike- Looks like you answered a question I was going to ask the man himself regarding what brand to buy- thanks. Price is reasonable too compared to some of the $90 pairs I've seen the runners tout.

Seems like a no-brainer to me-
You can wear your skirt (or shorts if that's your deal) and still get good ventilation)
Sun protection.
Tick protection.
Light to moderate skin and shin protection from overgrown trails or mild bushwhacking.
You can wear any sock you choose, and launder them separately.

AND- it will help with shin splints without resorting to gooey tape or shaving your legs.
AND- it may (not sure on all the health claims for those WITHOUT a medical issue) help with recovery of calf muscles.

I'm a bit confussed on what's not to like?

Speaking of Broke Dick bums who resort to wearing compression socks-
28001
28002

Looks like you are in good company if you choose to wear them.

Praha4
08-06-2014, 18:10
Just Bill: well said sir, I do regret my earlier comments here probably appeared defensive, and lacked the appropriate WB tact and diplomacy, I didn't wish the forum to digress from the technical discussion of the merits of compression sleeves ... as always you have written to the issue with a more rational tone. They are used by many triathletes as well as hikers. No question that the majority of AT hikers don't use them, and are quite successful in their hikes. It's always smartest to do the proper training, strength, aerobic base building and stretching before hiking. Even with all that training, you see professional athletes in the NBA and NFL using compression sleeves. Waste of money? Not. Happy trails!
Well PF, I'm with you on your argument, but not your conclusion.
Argument- Train your way out of injuries, don't use supportive or corrective devices as a crutch. Do your best to heal your body on your own.
Conclusion- When it's go time- use any reasonable thing you can get your hands on to make your trip enjoyable.

Florida Mike- Looks like you answered a question I was going to ask the man himself regarding what brand to buy- thanks. Price is reasonable too compared to some of the $90 pairs I've seen the runners tout.

Seems like a no-brainer to me-
You can wear your skirt (or shorts if that's your deal) and still get good ventilation)
Sun protection.
Tick protection.
Light to moderate skin and shin protection from overgrown trails or mild bushwhacking.
You can wear any sock you choose, and launder them separately.

AND- it will help with shin splints without resorting to gooey tape or shaving your legs.
AND- it may (not sure on all the health claims for those WITHOUT a medical issue) help with recovery of calf muscles.

I'm a bit confussed on what's not to like?

Speaking of Broke Dick bums who resort to wearing compression socks-
28001
28002

Looks like you are in good company if you choose to wear them.

Just Bill
08-06-2014, 19:07
Mr. Mike- fairly sure any errors in diplomacy, tact, or judgment did not originate from you.

I say "fairly sure" as that is the tactful and diplomatic way to state it. You're right, I am swell at that. :D

Still suck at attaching pics though. That's Mr. Kirk, wearing the very sleeves you suggested.

Pedaling Fool
08-06-2014, 19:37
I suck at tact and a lot of people seem to call me names:-? I wonder if there's a correlation:D

Dogwood
08-06-2014, 19:42
I suck at tact and a lot of people seem to call me names:-? I wonder if there's a correlation:D

LOL LMAO That was a well played escape.

rocketsocks
08-06-2014, 19:45
I suck at tact and a lot of people seem to call me names:-? I wonder if there's a correlation:D
Wait, I'd like to field this one..."What a bunch a Morons" :D


...I love your honesty...honestly! :)

rocketsocks
08-06-2014, 19:47
...oh, and the all popular..."Kumbyfreakin' yah" :D