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AO2134
09-17-2014, 11:30
Noob question here.

I have been eating Mountain house primarily because I can poor boiling water and let it sit, but can I do the same with Knorr Pasta Sides? Is it safe? Will it cook fully if I don't boil the pasta side for the 7 minutes?

I would prefer not doing any cleaning of my pot after cooking and that is why I love the Mountain House option. No cleaning required! Just pack out the container.

Can I do the same with the Pasta sides? I have heard of others using a ziplock back (must be heavy duty) and pouring pasta side + boiling water into the ziplock bag and putting it into a cozy to help keep warm.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated. While I love Mountain House, I like the idea of saving $7 per meal more.

If you know of any videos or instructional websites, please let me know. Assume I am too stupid to function in your responses. lol

Thanks!

saltysack
09-17-2014, 11:40
Try hawk vittles.....waaaaay better than mh...not cheap but good


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Bearleg
09-17-2014, 11:47
using my jetboil, i have prepared easy mac(at home remove from bowl, put into ziplock bag)that way, boil, pour, wait, add pepper eat. no problems, cost about $1

flemdawg1
09-17-2014, 11:52
Yes it works as FBC, just remember that you only need about half the water that the instructions call for. Add salt, EVOO and Nido or instant milk(if it calls for milk) to taste.

AO2134
09-17-2014, 11:52
using my jetboil, i have prepared easy mac(at home remove from bowl, put into ziplock bag)that way, boil, pour, wait, add pepper eat. no problems, cost about $1


Do I not have to worry about my ziplock bag melting then? That was one of my concerns. Which brand/type do you use?

Rocket Jones
09-17-2014, 12:03
Don't use boiling water. Near boiling is hot enough. Use ziploc freezer bags. Store brand and/or storage bags aren't tough enough.

RangerZ
09-17-2014, 12:05
Noob question here.

I have been eating Mountain house primarily because I can poor boiling water and let it sit, but can I do the same with Knorr Pasta Sides? Is it safe? Will it cook fully if I don't boil the pasta side for the 7 minutes?

I would prefer not doing any cleaning of my pot after cooking and that is why I love the Mountain House option. No cleaning required! Just pack out the container.

Can I do the same with the Pasta sides? I have heard of others using a ziplock back (must be heavy duty) and pouring pasta side + boiling water into the ziplock bag and putting it into a cozy to help keep warm.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated. While I love Mountain House, I like the idea of saving $7 per meal more.

If you know of any videos or instructional websites, please let me know. Assume I am too stupid to function in your responses. lol

Thanks!


I do this all the time. Use name brand freezer bags, they won't melt. Others are right about the decreased water or else you'll get soup. I add NIDO and TVP.

A reflectix cozy really helps. I generally do other things for about 10 minutes, then squish it around to make sure its all wet, then wait another 5 or 10 minutes. Add tuna or spam singles and eat.

Bluegrass
09-17-2014, 12:11
I do quite a bit of "freezer bag cooking" and have used various brands. The key is to get freezer bags and not storage bags. Quart-sized bags work well. Ziploc sells some now that have flat bottoms (http://www.ziploc.com/Products/Pages/SliderStorageFreezerBagsSmartZipSeal.aspx?SizeName =Quart%20(Freezer)).

Trailcooking has some information about the safety aspect. (http://www.trailcooking.com/trail-cooking-101/freezer-bags-safe/)

My favorite is "Thanksgiving dinner" - some instant mashed potatoes, instant gravy, instant stuffing, and some canned meat. For weekend trips I will prep the ziploc bags ahead of time (adding all the dry ingredients). On the trail I add the meat to the bag, add boiling water, and let sit for 5-10 minutes. It is a little more expensive than some other freezer bag recipes (Lipton sides, for example), but I recently priced it out with some friends on my last trip. They bought a $10 Mountain House meal. My ingredients cost about the same, but I was able to get 3-4 meals out of it. Had I left meat out the price per meal would have been about $2.

Gambit McCrae
09-17-2014, 12:12
Bring a thick paper clip, cut top off pasta side, boil water, poor it in, they are foil lined. let sit for 15-20 minutes. FYI, i hate pasta sides, I rather just pay the extra 5 bucks and have a good tasting meal. Several of the pasta sides have left me witha abd taste and even a headache from the flavors.

Bluegrass
09-17-2014, 12:15
Oh, and my friends that brought the Mountain House meals? They agreed that my Thanksgiving meal tasted better than their meal.

hikernutcasey
09-17-2014, 12:17
I eat the pasta sides a lot. I use the freezer bags but still carry a Sea to Summit bowl to eat out of. I hate eating out of the bags. To each their own.

Coffee
09-17-2014, 12:20
I haven't used pasta sides since I figured out how to cook mac & cheese in my Jetboil. It is a much more satisfying meal.

saltysack
09-17-2014, 12:29
Oh, and my friends that brought the Mountain House meals? They agreed that my Thanksgiving meal tasted better than their meal.

Yuuum sounds good


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lonehiker
09-17-2014, 12:43
Don't use boiling water. Near boiling is hot enough. Use ziploc freezer bags. Store brand and/or storage bags aren't tough enough.

I've used storage/bread bags for years with no problems. I use an old coleman stove bag as my cozy, put my bag in it, add pasta or rice side (right now the rice/pasta blends are my choice) then add my boiling water directly to it. Never had a leak. I have hiked with a friend that uses the same system. He has had one leak but he was storing his bags just in his food bag. We think that a sharp corner punctured his bag. I keep mine in my cozy and have never had a bag leak. Let me be clear, I am using those cheap flimsy bags that are called bread/storage bags that you would have to close with a twist tie. I usually use name brand but have had equal success with Albertson brand as well.

Another Kevin
09-17-2014, 13:23
I've used storage/bread bags for years with no problems. I use an old coleman stove bag as my cozy, put my bag in it, add pasta or rice side (right now the rice/pasta blends are my choice) then add my boiling water directly to it. Never had a leak. I have hiked with a friend that uses the same system. He has had one leak but he was storing his bags just in his food bag. We think that a sharp corner punctured his bag. I keep mine in my cozy and have never had a bag leak. Let me be clear, I am using those cheap flimsy bags that are called bread/storage bags that you would have to close with a twist tie. I usually use name brand but have had equal success with Albertson brand as well.

I tried using an off-brand freezer bag exactly once. The seams burst when I poured the boiling water in. I was able mostly to rescue the meal by dumping back in the pot immediately, because the Reflectix cozy contained almost all the liquid, but it wasn't a pleasant experience. Given this experience, I'm not about to try storage bags.

saltysack
09-17-2014, 13:37
I tried using an off-brand freezer bag exactly once. The seams burst when I poured the boiling water in. I was able mostly to rescue the meal by dumping back in the pot immediately, because the Reflectix cozy contained almost all the liquid, but it wasn't a pleasant experience. Given this experience, I'm not about to try storage bags.

I'm a little concerned with putting boiling water and eating from plastic... Does this plastic leach out when boiling water put in...like putting boiling water in a solo cup.... Melts...cold only?


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bigcranky
09-17-2014, 13:37
I have tried using a freezer bag to cook a pasta side and got a gloppy sticky mess. They do NOT need the whole 7 minutes simmering -- just bringing the side to a boil in the pot and then putting the pot in a cozy is enough. I didn't find cleaning the pot to be a huge problem, but then whenever I had the opportunity I would make easy mac in a freezer bag, so go figure. (Use the brand name freezer bags, as noted above.)

atmilkman
09-17-2014, 13:38
Yes it works as FBC, just remember that you only need about half the water that the instructions call for. Add salt, EVOO and Nido or instant milk(if it calls for milk) to taste.


I do this all the time. Use name brand freezer bags, they won't melt. Others are right about the decreased water or else you'll get soup. I add NIDO and TVP.

A reflectix cozy really helps. I generally do other things for about 10 minutes, then squish it around to make sure its all wet, then wait another 5 or 10 minutes. Add tuna or spam singles and eat.
+1 and +1 on both of these suggestions. Half the water. Never a problem with boiling water and name brand bags. Put in reflectix cozy. I wait about half and hour. I like my food well cooked and not stiff. Sometimes food is still too hot, depends on outside temp. I put the bag back down in my Jetboil (it has long since cooled down) and drape the opening of the bag over the side of the cup. Very easy to eat out of and of course very easy clean up.

Another Kevin
09-17-2014, 13:51
I'm a little concerned with putting boiling water and eating from plastic... Does this plastic leach out when boiling water put in...like putting boiling water in a solo cup.... Melts...cold only?


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Not a huge worry when using food grade bags. One scenario that the manufacturers consider is filling the bag with hot food from right off the stove. Which isn't too different from freezer bag cooking, when you think about it.

saltysack
09-17-2014, 14:01
Ok glad too hear it...we try to avoid plastics when possible...


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Coffee
09-17-2014, 14:18
Freezer bags are supposed to be microwave safe. If they are microwave safe, it seems fine to put boiling water in them and let sit. That being said, I don't use freezer bags for cooking since I haven't ever had trouble cleaning out my Jetboil, at least sufficient for my standards on the trail - meaning I don't worry about getting it perfectly clean. Reason being that when I boil water the next morning for breakfast, I let it boil a bit longer which in theory should sanitize the pot before I eat from it again.

saltysack
09-17-2014, 14:33
I do quite a bit of "freezer bag cooking" and have used various brands. The key is to get freezer bags and not storage bags. Quart-sized bags work well. Ziploc sells some now that have flat bottoms (http://www.ziploc.com/Products/Pages/SliderStorageFreezerBagsSmartZipSeal.aspx?SizeName =Quart%20(Freezer)).

Trailcooking has some information about the safety aspect. (http://www.trailcooking.com/trail-cooking-101/freezer-bags-safe/)

My favorite is "Thanksgiving dinner" - some instant mashed potatoes, instant gravy, instant stuffing, and some canned meat. For weekend trips I will prep the ziploc bags ahead of time (adding all the dry ingredients). On the trail I add the meat to the bag, add boiling water, and let sit for 5-10 minutes. It is a little more expensive than some other freezer bag recipes (Lipton sides, for example), but I recently priced it out with some friends on my last trip. They bought a $10 Mountain House meal. My ingredients cost about the same, but I was able to get 3-4 meals out of it. Had I left meat out the price per meal would have been about $2.


How much of each do u put in each bag per meal? I assume u don't buy individual packets if potatoes etc...they sell turkey in a pouch like tuna?



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Old Hiker
09-17-2014, 14:51
Do not like the "pasta" sides - they always taste funny on the Trail for some reason. I WILL use the "rice" sides - love these. A small can of chicken or pouch of Spam added and I'm good to go.

If you don't like paying full price for single MH meals: http://www.theepicenter.com/ : has sales on #10 cans every now and then. I have a few of the pasta primavera and others to divide up into ziploc brand freezer bags in 2016. Hurrican prep until I'm hiking.

lonehiker
09-17-2014, 15:24
I tried using an off-brand freezer bag exactly once. The seams burst when I poured the boiling water in. I was able mostly to rescue the meal by dumping back in the pot immediately, because the Reflectix cozy contained almost all the liquid, but it wasn't a pleasant experience. Given this experience, I'm not about to try storage bags.

Can't beat that logic.

My solution to the gloppy mess of the pasta sides is to stir them a couple of times during the cooking/rehydration process. This seems to help. Another thing is that I use the recommended amount of water. I don't mind if it is a bit soupy and this could also contribute to my not having the sticking problems many of you seem to have. I have also found that the spirals and the shells seem not to stick as much as the long noodles. But, once again, I stir them a few times to prevent sticking.

swisscross
09-17-2014, 15:41
Knorr's Mexican rice side, pack of chicken, hot sauce or salsa verde (packs from Taco "H"ell) on a tortilla makes a fine meal. Actually makes more than I can eat in one sitting so I repackage prior to leaving.

One of my favorite home packaged meals is cuscus, sun dried tomatoes, dehydrated green olives, crushed red pepper flakes, dehydrated trout with a little olive oil....yum.

Since I broke away from the Knorr's sides topic...my favorite lunch is...pack of chicken, add tarragon, sliced almonds, two packs of self stable mayo, pack of lemon juice and a dash of hot sauce.. Chicken salad, spread on crackers.

saltysack
09-17-2014, 15:44
Knorr's Mexican rice side, pack of chicken, hot sauce or salsa verde (packs from Taco "H"ell) on a tortilla makes a fine meal. Actually makes more than I can eat in one sitting so I repackage prior to leaving.

One of my favorite home packaged meals is cuscus, sun dried tomatoes, dehydrated green olives, crushed red pepper flakes, dehydrated trout with a little olive oil....yum.

Since I broke away from the Knorr's sides topic...my favorite lunch is...pack of chicken, add tarragon, sliced almonds, two packs of self stable mayo, pack of lemon juice and a dash of hot sauce.. Chicken salad, spread on crackers.

Damn another goody...can't wait to try this and the thanksgiving meal!! Thx


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Rocket Jones
09-17-2014, 16:59
I always carry a small amount of instant mashed potatoes to add if my FBC meal is soupy. Thickens it up without adding flavor. Instant refried beans (or dehydrated) work the same way.

Bluegrass
09-17-2014, 18:49
I have been doing it long enough that I eyeball the amounts of dry ingredients.

If I had to guess here at work, I would say:
2/3 cup instant mashed potatoes
2/3 cup instant stuffing
1/2 package instant gravy mix
1 can or package chicken or turkey

That is probably on the conservative side, so it could be up to a cup of potatoes and stuffing.

I try to match the gravy flavor and stuffing flavor to the meat (so turkey stuffing and turkey gravy if I am doing turkey)

They sell both canned turkey, canned chicken, and sometimes you can find vacuum packed chicken. They should be in most grocery stores right next to the canned tuna. Do not make the mistake I made on one trip - I bought a can of turkey and then forgot to bring anything to open the can with.

I have done something similar to swisscross's couscous dish. Couscous, sundried tomatoes, and whatever meat I can find.

I usually carry some soy protein powder with me and add that to most things I make (oatmeal, dinner, etc.) That tends to thicken things up fairly quickly and easily.

Now I am getting hungry.

Coffee
09-17-2014, 19:05
Breadcrumbs work pretty well as a thickening agent - either purchased as breadcrumbs or (my preference) by buying croutons and crushing the amount needed to make the appropriate amount of thickening agent.

rocketsocks
09-17-2014, 19:19
all good ideas as thickeners, thanks.

...from the one who never measures.

rocketsocks
09-17-2014, 19:20
all good ideas as thickeners, thanks.

...from the one who never measures.
PS, I never know if I'm having soup or stew for dinner, but I like em both so....

AO2134
09-17-2014, 21:14
Thanks everyone!!! There are some amazing ideas here. I will put some of them to use next weekend!

MuddyWaters
09-17-2014, 21:24
Pasta sides really don't cook in freezer bag cooking. They come out pasty. They really need to be cooked to come out good . I've eaten plenty that weren't.


Preparing your own meals using either instant rice, or ramen noodles, is the key to eating good with fbc. Or dehydrating. Both have been precooked and dehydrated and do good in fbc. Texture is important to palatability.

Rocket Jones
09-18-2014, 05:58
I have been doing it long enough that I eyeball the amounts of dry ingredients.

If I had to guess here at work, I would say:
2/3 cup instant mashed potatoes
2/3 cup instant stuffing
1/2 package instant gravy mix
1 can or package chicken or turkey


You can toss in a half handful of dried cranberries too for Thanksgiving. ;)

LittleRock
09-19-2014, 09:29
Simple trick I use for Knorr pasta/rice meals:

Bring a block of sharp cheddar cheese (which lasts up to a week without refrigeration), cut up about 2-3 ounces into small chunks, and melt it into your cooked pasta or rice. There are a few flavors (e.g. beans and rice) that aren't very good this way, but most are MUCH better w/ cheese. IMO, better than any MH meals and a fraction of the price.

saltysack
09-19-2014, 09:49
Simple trick I use for Knorr pasta/rice meals:

Bring a block of sharp cheddar cheese (which lasts up to a week without refrigeration), cut up about 2-3 ounces into small chunks, and melt it into your cooked pasta or rice. There are a few flavors (e.g. beans and rice) that aren't very good this way, but most are MUCH better w/ cheese. IMO, better than any MH meals and a fraction of the price.

It will keep after being in refer?


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bigcranky
09-19-2014, 11:38
It will keep after being in refer?


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Yes. Good sharp cheddar keeps very well on the trail.


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saltysack
09-19-2014, 12:57
Thx I love sharp chedder


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Another Kevin
09-19-2014, 13:02
Something I learnt quite recently. Hard cheese sweat less if you wrap them in wax paper and then loosely in plastic wrap than if you have them in a Ziploc. You have to keep flies and mites off them, but they actually travel better exposed to a little bit of air. Who knew?

Colter
09-19-2014, 21:16
I don't do any real washing of my pot, and I don't do freezer bag cooking, and I do use the Knorr's Pasta and Rice Sides.

When I'm using my MRS Titan Kettle I heat the water to boiling, dump in the pasta or rice, stir, put the lid on, and wrap with my balaclava or some type of cozy to keep it as hot as possible. Usually I'll stir again in about 5 minutes. I let it soak maybe 12 minutes depending on how hydrated it is when I check.

I then eat my meal, scrape out my container, lick my spoon and call it good. Next meal both my container and spoon contact boiling water so I'm not worried that it wasn't cleaned perfectly last time.

I think this whole method is very common amongst thru-hikers, and Knorr's are, needless to say, a staple.

Chair-man
09-19-2014, 22:54
Bring a thick paper clip, cut top off pasta side, boil water, poor it in, they are foil lined. let sit for 15-20 minutes.

This is probably the best advice on this thread. The foil lined packets really keep the heat in. I let mine sit for 30 minutes and it's still piping hot and thoroughly cooked and no pot to clean. I suspect the reason some folks feel a bit queasy after eating Knorrs is because it's undercooked which makes your digestive system work twice as hard to break down the food.


I then eat my meal, scrape out my container, lick my spoon and call it good. Next meal both my container and spoon contact boiling water so I'm not worried that it wasn't cleaned perfectly last time.

Colter,

I really enjoyed reading your Alaskan journal (http://bucktrack.com/Alaska_Survival_Journal.html). But not cleaning your pot. I don't know man.

Theosus
09-20-2014, 10:04
Ive used the knorr sides. Usually I cut them in half, the full bag makes too much for me. Im usually doing one or two nights and just don't get that hungry. Otherwise my meals consist of idahoan potatoes and maybe some beef jerky at night, and grits and a bagel or something in the morning.

saltysack
09-20-2014, 23:32
Yes. Good sharp cheddar keeps very well on the trail.


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What is best way to keep a sharp cheddar cheese block good for use while out for 4 days?


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Hikes in Rain
09-21-2014, 09:47
Just put it in a baggie. It'll be fine, although it may "weep" a bit of liquid. Won't hurt a thing. Remember, cheese is how we kept milk good without refrigeration for centuries.

Coffee
09-21-2014, 10:24
Regarding cheese and pasta, I haven't used blocks of cheese but I have used dried pasta with cheese many times. The Trader Joe's tortellini product, either regular cheese or cheese pesto, is excellent and very cheap ($1.99 or $2.99 for a 16 ounce bag). The Barilla brand is more widely available but quite a bit more expensive. I normally improvise a sauce for this pasta by using a half bag of a Knorr Pesto sauce mix plus plenty of olive oil. It takes some experimentation to determine the right amount of water to use, and also this type of pasta requires quite a bit of time in a pot cozy to rehydrate adequately. I typically boil water, add the pasta, bring it back to a boil and then put in a pot cozy for ten minutes. Then I bring the pasta to a boil again and put it back in the cozy for another 5-10 minutes. End result is very good and better than mac & cheese. Vastly better than a Knorr's side. But I still eat Mac & cheese quite a bit since it is easier to find even in the smallest convenience store.

Another Kevin
09-22-2014, 07:38
Just put it in a baggie. It'll be fine, although it may "weep" a bit of liquid. Won't hurt a thing. Remember, cheese is how we kept milk good without refrigeration for centuries.

I recently learnt that an even better approach is to wrap hard cheese in waxed paper, and then overwrap loosely with plastic wrap. Apparently it sweats less if it isn't tightly sealed in a ziploc.

saltysack
09-22-2014, 07:43
Thx I'll give it a try


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saltysack
10-16-2014, 07:30
I do quite a bit of "freezer bag cooking" and have used various brands. The key is to get freezer bags and not storage bags. Quart-sized bags work well. Ziploc sells some now that have flat bottoms (http://www.ziploc.com/Products/Pages/SliderStorageFreezerBagsSmartZipSeal.aspx?SizeName =Quart%20(Freezer)).

Trailcooking has some information about the safety aspect. (http://www.trailcooking.com/trail-cooking-101/freezer-bags-safe/)

My favorite is "Thanksgiving dinner" - some instant mashed potatoes, instant gravy, instant stuffing, and some canned meat. For weekend trips I will prep the ziploc bags ahead of time (adding all the dry ingredients). On the trail I add the meat to the bag, add boiling water, and let sit for 5-10 minutes. It is a little more expensive than some other freezer bag recipes (Lipton sides, for example), but I recently priced it out with some friends on my last trip. They bought a $10 Mountain House meal. My ingredients cost about the same, but I was able to get 3-4 meals out of it. Had I left meat out the price per meal would have been about $2.

Bg
Sent u pm


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AO2134
10-16-2014, 11:20
So I did my first two freezer bag cooking attemps recently. I did Idahoan, which was great and I also did a Pasta side recently. It turned out to be a little soupy, but it was fully cooked and with minimal clumping. I enjoyed it. I enjoyed it even more given that I saved $7 per meal compared to mountain house meal.

wormer
10-16-2014, 11:35
I do my pasta and rice same as Gambit McCrae & Chair-man. Pour hot water into the bag that the pasta came in, seal the bag with a clip and eat after 10- 15 minutes. I now eat the Knorrs rice and pasta at home the same way.

lal2wx
11-10-2014, 05:04
I'm still inconsistent on getting pasta sides to be cooked perfectly and not soupy, but I find I'm hungry so a little extra soupiness doesn't really matter. I'm of the mindset that pasta sides are so processed that making sure it's not slightly undercooked isn't an issue in regards to not being sick. You're not cooking a steak or anything.

With FBC, I always use heavy duty ziploc freezer bags. They won't burst and leak on you, and they're well enough made that after packing them out I can clean and reuse them to cut down on plastic garbage. If you're FBC'ing, dumping into a bowl to eat from doesn't make a lot of sense to me as there is now a container that needs to be cleaned. A pot cozy made from a sunshine windshield reflector with a bottom that holds the bag upright is great.

Rocket Jones
11-10-2014, 07:17
Carry a little extra instant mashed potato flakes, parmesan cheese or instant refried beans. Any of those will thicken up a soupy meal without affecting the flavor.

Ken.davidson
11-10-2014, 08:46
On my latest hike I tried Knorr sides for the first. I am normally only doing FBC cooking. The first time I made them in my pot boiling then simmering them per directions. The second time I used the bag from the box with my trusty cozy. For me the original bag is the best option. Both options produced a great flavorful meal of equal consistency flavor. I will be using Knorr sides in the future hikes.

atmilkman
11-10-2014, 11:57
I recently learnt that an even better approach is to wrap hard cheese in waxed paper, and then overwrap loosely with plastic wrap. Apparently it sweats less if it isn't tightly sealed in a ziploc.

Nice tip. Next time I'm gonna try this only loosely in a baggie not zipped.

RED-DOG
11-10-2014, 13:08
I do a lot of freezer bag cooking and the freezer bags works perfectly fine but about a year ago I bought a Mountain House meal and when I was finished with the meal I started looking at the bag itself and decided to try one instead of a freezer bag works great and you don't need a cozy, so now what I do is I will buy one Mountain house meal every week or every two weeks and just simply Re-use the bag the meal came in instead of a freezer bag works great and I don't have to carry all that freezer bag trash.

lonehiker
11-10-2014, 17:30
[QUOTE=RED-DOG;1921323]I do a lot of freezer bag cooking and the freezer bags works perfectly fine but about a year ago I bought a Mountain House meal and when I was finished with the meal I started looking at the bag itself and decided to try one instead of a freezer bag works great and you don't need a cozy, so now what I do is I will buy one Mountain house meal every week or every two weeks and just simply Re-use the bag the meal came in instead of a freezer bag works great and I don't have to carry all that freezer bag trash.[/QUOTE

So you have to wash the MH bag after each meal? If that is the case, doesn't it defeat the purpose of FBC?

gbolt
11-10-2014, 20:12
I do a lot of freezer bag cooking and the freezer bags works perfectly fine but about a year ago I bought a Mountain House meal and when I was finished with the meal I started looking at the bag itself and decided to try one instead of a freezer bag works great and you don't need a cozy, so now what I do is I will buy one Mountain house meal every week or every two weeks and just simply Re-use the bag the meal came in instead of a freezer bag works great and I don't have to carry all that freezer bag trash.

+1 I buy one MH and two to three Knorrs Side and use the MH as the cook bag instead of a freezer bag. I don't usually do the pasta sides, but love the rice meals as many have suggested.

shelb
11-11-2014, 00:29
I haven't used pasta sides since I figured out how to cook mac & cheese in my Jetboil. It is a much more satisfying meal.

While I enjoy the pasta and rice sides (with added meat), I am intrigued by your post. How do you cook Mac & cheese in a jetboil without burning anything? (I only like to heat water in my JetBoil because of the burn factor!)