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ksquared
10-18-2014, 16:59
I've had a few people tell to layer sleeping pads in order to keep the cold of the ground from making me cold. I use a blow up pad if that makes a difference. Can anyone give me some insight in to what that means?




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russb
10-18-2014, 17:03
If the blow up pad is insulated, then the optimal layering would be a ccf pad on the ground, then your pad, then you. If it is NOT an insulated pad, then it goes on the bottom followed by a ccf then you.

ksquared
10-18-2014, 17:17
I don't think that it's insulated (this is what I've got: http://www.backcountryedge.com/exped-synmat-lite-5.aspx). What is a ccf pad? Closed cell foam correct? My other question is, do you think it would be possible to lay one of those tin foil looking emergency blankets down on the floor of the tent under the sleeping pad? I think that would reflect the heat well enough and it's a lot lighter and packs down small. And saving up for a thru has made me broke so it's a much more cost effective solution.

I'm probably completely off base with this, but has anyone heard of this being done or tried it for yourself?

Coffee
10-18-2014, 17:28
The synmat is insulated and has an r value of 3.8 according to the website (higher r values are more insulated).

I have a Thermarest Prolite with an r value of just 2.1 and I feel like it is good into the high 20s along with my Marmot Helium. I am most likely going to take the Prolite on the PCT next year and I feel like it should do fine. However, I am taking a snow skills course in the winter and for that I plan to use my Prolite over a cheap Wal-Mart blue foam pad that I'll buy when I get to California and probably donate after I use it. By combining a CCF and Prolite, I feel like I should be fine into the teens, provided that I wear pretty much all of my clothing to bed and hope that my Helium will keep me warm...

Rocket Jones
10-18-2014, 17:40
Try a test of your pads. Personally, I find that I'm a little warmer with my CCF pad (cheapie from Wally World) on top of my NeoAir Trekker. A lot of people prefer the CCF pad on the bottom. The CCF pad is bulky but very lightweight.

Malto
10-18-2014, 17:56
The best winter setup that I have used is Neoair xtherm. At 5.8R it is one of the warmest setup. I have been a very comfy boy on some very cold nights. Also, you need a full length pad, the short ones IMHO are for three season conditions.

2015 Lady Thru-Hiker
10-18-2014, 18:24
The best winter setup that I have used is Neoair xtherm. At 5.8R it is one of the warmest setup. I have been a very comfy boy on some very cold nights. Also, you need a full length pad, the short ones IMHO are for three season conditions.

Love my xtherm. Very comfortable for me sleeping wise and so far temp wise. Gonna take it out for 3 nights next weekend with nighttime temps projected in the 30s. In the warmer weather I just flip it over so the reflective side is facing down. Think the highest nighttime temp was in the high 70s. Still comfortable for me. I did invest in the little pump and will be taking it with me. Does such a good job it is worth the 2 (I think it is) ounces.

Malto
10-18-2014, 20:09
Love my xtherm. Very comfortable for me sleeping wise and so far temp wise. Gonna take it out for 3 nights next weekend with nighttime temps projected in the 30s. In the warmer weather I just flip it over so the reflective side is facing down. Think the highest nighttime temp was in the high 70s. Still comfortable for me. I did invest in the little pump and will be taking it with me. Does such a good job it is worth the 2 (I think it is) ounces.

I have the little pump as well and get all kinds of grief from my less enlightened UL hiking friends. Jealousy is tough.

cjlusmc
10-18-2014, 20:49
I don't think that it's insulated (this is what I've got: http://www.backcountryedge.com/exped-synmat-lite-5.aspx). What is a ccf pad? Closed cell foam correct? My other question is, do you think it would be possible to lay one of those tin foil looking emergency blankets down on the floor of the tent under the sleeping pad? I think that would reflect the heat well enough and it's a lot lighter and packs down small. And saving up for a thru has made me broke so it's a much more cost effective solution.

I'm probably completely off base with this, but has anyone heard of this being done or tried it for yourself?

I've tried it and had better luck with a section of refectix cut to proper size put under the pad. Can be found at most hardware/ home improvement stores and reflects a LOT of heat back.

To pack, roll up the piece, put in in your pack, let it unroll, then pack everything inside the tube.

Use excess material for pot cozy, sit pad, etc etc.

10-K
10-18-2014, 20:49
I use a Neoair XLite short with a Ridgerest Solite regular (72" I think..) under it. I prop my legs up on my pack which lets my bag loft a bit under my legs. I also wear a pair of silk thermals when I'm sleeping in cold weather. I'm also not above taking my down booties but don't tell anybody. :)

Works around here, not sure how it'd do in serious winter weather.

Slack-jawed Trog
10-23-2014, 20:05
It's been a while since I set up a tent on the snow/frozen ground but here's my $.02...

I've found that a couple of CCF pads is tolerable, for me. Slightly more tolerable if one of the CCF pads is a nice thick Z-rest. When the temps fall below 30 F, a single pad is never enough for me, and a bag-liner helps. When the temp is the single digits or (-)s the bag-liner is a must, for me, as is a dry sleep-dedicated base layer, including a fleece balaclava. I've been known to sleep on the concrete floor of a certain So. Berkshires cabin by the door on a January trip or two. :rolleyes: In spite of the wood stove (a very good one for the $!) that concrete is a heat-sink, and never warms up.

And FWIW, a cheap WallyWorld blue CCF pad makes a great sit/kneel pad for camp and kitchen chores, too. YMMV, and invariably will...

Mags
10-23-2014, 20:15
I have the little pump as well and get all kinds of grief from my less enlightened UL hiking friends. Jealousy is tough.

A certain Australian hiker was telling me about your pump. Not sure if there was jealousy or not in his voice. :P

(He also spoke very highly of you, being serious!)

On another serious note, you'll want at least an R value of five total for deep winter backpacking.

Something I wrote a while back that may be helpful.

http://www.pmags.com/sleepings-pads-a-grounded-view

Rolex
10-23-2014, 20:56
I use a Neoair XLite short with a Ridgerest Solite regular (72" I think..) under it. I prop my legs up on my pack which lets my bag loft a bit under my legs. I also wear a pair of silk thermals when I'm sleeping in cold weather. I'm also not above taking my down booties but don't tell anybody. :)

Works around here, not sure how it'd do in serious winter weather.

Thanks for that 10k. I use the neoair xlite regular and have been wondering what to do in the less than 30 degree ranges.

Malto
10-23-2014, 21:42
A certain Australian hiker was telling me about your pump. Not sure if there was jealousy or not in his voice. :P

(He also spoke very highly of you, being serious!)

On another serious note, you'll want at least an R value of five total for deep winter backpacking.

Something I wrote a while back that may be helpful.

http://www.pmags.com/sleepings-pads-a-grounded-view

major league jealousy. Same with Bobcat and Snorkel. That said Aussie hiker has a rather funny video with alternate ways of inflating pads that I expect to see on his site any day. He recorded it on the first night of the Wonderland hike that you could have hike with us. :)