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Ground Control
10-25-2014, 14:01
Anyone have experience with food allergies?

I'm just learning I'm allergic to milk, corn and nuts. Until I see an allergist to further define the allergies, this is pretty limiting. I have a decent amount of food knowledge, but still. Dairy, corn products and nuts is sort of like the tri-fecta.

Clearly this will dramatically change my hiking prep. Cliff bars contain all three allergens, Gorp is obviously out. Larabars have nuts. I've become good at making my own jerky, and I know I can replace the Ramen spice packs with an all non-corn product alternative... that part is way off, though. Currently needing to re-define my kitchen and shopping.

Any directions for resources, phone apps, recommended reading is much appreciated. Sorta stumped. (and hungry...)

rafe
10-25-2014, 15:55
You can still eat aged cheese -- cheddar and the like, just not the soft gooey kinds like brie.

http://lifehacker.com/the-best-cheeses-to-eat-if-youre-lactose-intolerant-1563386663

Ground Control
10-26-2014, 08:31
You can still eat aged cheese -- cheddar and the like, just not the soft gooey kinds like brie.

http://lifehacker.com/the-best-cheeses-to-eat-if-youre-lactose-intolerant-1563386663

Thanks for the reply...

Unfortunately, I believe that rule holds true for folks with lactose intolerance. Allergies are different, and in many cases means avoiding all kinds of dairy, including hard cheeses. My current instructions are to avoid it all. Non-dairy cheeses are also not an option for me, as most seem to be flavored with a corn-by product.

It turns out that corn allergies are extremely rare, and false positives on the test are common. I'm hoping that more extensive testing from an allergist will show that I have just corn sensitivity, which is fairly common. If so, that might open me up to some of the corn by-products, such as xantham gum, maltodextrin, dextrose, glucose... (it's a terribly long list of corn derivatives...) I'm crossing my fingers that I can open up the corn floodgate again when my the allergist okays it and my health returns.

So far, this has been a valuable resource.
http://www.foodsmatter.com/allergy_intolerance/index_allergy_intolerance.html

I'd love to hear from other hikers/ppl who have food allergy experience and how they overcame the obstacles both on and off the trail. Recommended reading, products, recipes... any information is much welcomed. Thanks in advance.

July
10-26-2014, 11:50
Sometimes 'eliminating' a food from your diet for a period of time ie 2-6 months will help. Can then reintroduce at a moderate level, often what we crave most is the worst for us.

Rocket Jones
10-26-2014, 14:26
Sounds like an opportunity to improve your hiking diet. More dehydrated veggies and meat. Use reduced sodium chicken stock cubes instead of instant milk in your mashed potatoes. Make your own dehydrated stuffing, chilies and soups. Other than being dirt cheap, I've never understood the infatuation with ramen.

Think about it, you're not as limited as you think.

tf bear
10-26-2014, 20:56
Peanut allergy for my son. It limits options for resupply and sharing food since I like peanuts. We jus have to look for ingredients. Gorp is made specific for him. Also lots of gummie bears and skittles. He trades skittles with other hikers. No power bars or Clift bars. He does the sport beans or blocks which are more expensive

Trailweaver
10-27-2014, 02:33
If your nut allergy is "tree" nuts, then you may well be able to eat peanuts. There's one gorp ingredient you can have, so make your own with stuff you can eat. It's better that way: you can fill your baggie with your favorite things!

There are dairy substitutes too. You may have to make some taste adjustments, but it shouldn't be too difficult once you just know it has to be done. There are many food suppliers (other than grocery stores) online which sell things like this in bulk. You may have to have someone at home sending you care packages a little more than the average hiker, but you won't starve.

swjohnsey
10-27-2014, 03:57
Have you wondered how you made it this far being allergic to these very common foods?

Ground Control
10-27-2014, 09:21
Thanks for all the replies, suggestions and thoughts. Sure do hope that possibility of re-introducing at least SOME of the foods in 2 - 6 months. Milk, cheese, and peanut butter are what I crave the most, so the adage about "what you crave the most" appears to hold true here.

Great point on the opportunity to get more adventurous with the dehydrator, Rocket Jones. I'm starting that process today.

Dairy substitutes are made more challenging with the corn allergy. Even Coconut milk has Xantham Gum, so that's out. Almond milk is out until I see an allergist and get more information on the "peanut allergy" - for now I'm told to avoid all nuts. Every vegan butter substitute I saw in Sprouts Grocery Store yesterday included a corn by-product. So far, I've got Veganaise and Silk (soy milk)... Certainly a learning curve here. Keep the suggestions coming!


Have you wondered how you made it this far being allergic to these very common foods?

Very much, yes. Dumbfounded by it, actually, as I'm 39 and I drink a LOT of milk. Interestingly, my theory is related to hiking:

Starting two summers ago, each 3-4 day hiking outing included a homemade 3-4 lb bag of GORP. The rest of my hiking diet was heavy on Nido and Cliff bars, which contain all 3 of my allergens. I'd feel a little sick after each hike, but attributed it to getting wet, cold, or whatever hardships I had encountered while hiking.

Because I use a phone-app to chart my weight, I can see a significant spike in my weight after each hike during the last 2 years, where I had been on this diet of allergens. Interestingly enough, I wasn't healthy during this two year period. Missed work, saw the doctor quite a bit, sometimes had elevated white blood cell count. I had abdominal pain, couldn't seem to process alcohol, some other odd symptoms.

Before the more recent decline, we were doing a great deal of traveling. Traveling light, my diet had reverted to the box of granola bars (contains all 3 allergens) and a huge bag of GORP. After telling the Doc I had been on the AT, he tested for Lyme, water-born parasites and contagious diseases. Other tests were on my organs, CT, ultra-sound... a HUGE amount of testing, and so far the only answer is these three food allergies.

Based on this, I believe I have a peanut (or nut) allergy that was exasperated by the heavy GORP intake and it made my sensitivities to corn and milk worse by depleting resources in my gut. (Data from bloodwork shows the the peanut allergy was at 0.3, while the other two were barely above the threshold of 0.1) I probably haven't had it all my life; it likely developed in recent years.

FWIW, this pretty new to me and my theory might be wayyyy off.

-------------

Anyway I remain very interested in harvesting intel from the whiteblaze community, which has been a boon of knowledge on a vast array of topics. Thanks again to those who have posted, and any other intel is most welcomed.

misprof
10-27-2014, 09:38
I am lactose intolerant and allergic to eggs. My husband has problems with gluten. So between the two of us we have had to be creative. For calorie loading we carry olive oil or coconut oil. Your case you would need to go olive. I also pound/ grind together craisins, raisins, dates and dark cocoa and some oil to hold it together. You can add oats and honey to this. I add coconut to it but that won't do for you. You can use dried avocado, pemmican. You may have to make a lot for yourself, but then you know what is in it.

When I first found out I was allergic I thought I could eat almost nothing. I have learned there is many things I can eat esp. if I am willing to start from scratch.
I would also look up a Paleo website.

If you can do wheat then try couscous for starch. It's measurements are about 1 to 1 for cooking, does not need to simmer as a cozy works great for it. You can also do dried, sweet potatoes or regular potatoes, or dried powdered beans. The last one is hard to find.

rhjanes
10-27-2014, 09:52
I don't tolerate corn. It started 30 years ago (I'm in my mid-50s). At first I had to cut out whole corn and corn on the cob. Then creamed. Now, I avoid as much as possible. Frito's are a no-no. Doritos, Just a few at a time. I avoid corn, it is easy to do. However, the corn sugars and such, probably do bother me some, but I'm OK with not cutting them out.
Milk, my mom, at like 80, went from LOVING all dairy to total intolerance. She is a retired nurse and is able to control it with diet. I believe I am also mildly intolerant and so I discussed with my primary care doctor on my physical. His advice was to cut out as much dairy as possible. So I switched to Lite Soy milk (I like it better anyway!), and cut out ice-cream and yogurt. I've been able to add some yogurt back in. But what the doc said was to buy some of the generic lactase tablets, the bottle and some in the individual packets to have in a pocket. Doc said to take one with every meal and every snack also. Even if you THINK there isn't milk in it, there is! Read the ingredients on even bread....yep, milk solids and such. So, when I eat, I take a tablet. It does help. But avoidance isn't all that hard either.

Just Tom
10-27-2014, 14:21
My son has multiple food allergies, including dairy, sesame, and nuts. Check out Sun Butter (http://www.sunbutter.com) as a peanut butter replacement. In place of power bars or cliff bars, check out the ones from Candice Foods (http://www.candicefoods.com). There are lots of alternatives, but it takes work and usually costs more. Any other specific items you are looking to replace on your hiking trips?

Dogwood
10-28-2014, 12:44
Have you wondered how you made it this far being allergic to these very common foods?

Excellent question! One, you're not likely to get a decent answer from other than a list of possibilities from most M.D.s

Neemor
11-08-2014, 13:49
I have quite the allergy to Milk and shellfish. fortunately shellfish isn't a problem on the trail. but milk is in everything now a days... i dont ever buy the mountain house meal bags or any of the other brands. I have gotten some of the mountain house 1 gallon boxes of ground beef to mix with ramin noodles.

I am also allergic to wheat and a ton of other weird things like green apples and salmon. but not as bad. so i still have them on occasion.

My allergies to milk and shellfish have been with me since birth, so i don't really ever have cravings for things with them in it. but after a while you find ways around it. and find other things to take its place.
when my wheat allergy was really bad i had a lot of rhy bread and "rice spaghetti"

Nuts is a tough one though. maybe swap the nuts in your trail mix for different dehydrated meats.
dehydrated ground beef in a trail mix tastes amazing!

Good Luck!

Just Tom
11-08-2014, 16:01
Swap in pumpkin seeds for the nuts in trail mix, work great!

The Old Boot
11-08-2014, 17:04
You might also want to look at carob chips for mixing with other things to make your own gorp. I buy mine at the bulk food store as I'm lactose intolerant.

Wise Old Owl
11-08-2014, 17:13
Peanut allergy for my son. It limits options for resupply and sharing food since I like peanuts. We jus have to look for ingredients. Gorp is made specific for him. Also lots of gummie bears and skittles. He trades skittles with other hikers. No power bars or Clift bars. He does the sport beans or blocks which are more expensive

There is hope on the horizon & peliminary testing around several places in the US - 2nd round is in Pittsburg for children in the near future.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/07/31/peanut-allergy-treatment-patch-study/2606103/
http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/10/22/us-dbv-techusa-listing-idUSKCN0IB0QQ20141022
http://www.wrcbtv.com/story/25923630/new-food-allergy-treatments

I have a weird allergy to fresh little neck clams... but canned is OK.

Ground Control
01-03-2015, 10:04
OP here.

Rather than bore you with tales of the allergist scratch-test, and elimination-reintroduction diet, I'd just say that food allergies or sensitivities appear unrelated to my problem.

It was an expensive and time consuming process that ultimately gave us few real answers. Often the information seemed even contradictory. I would caution anyone, other than those that have the most extreme symptoms & reactions, to invest themselves heavily in the diagnosis of food allergies.

Connie
01-03-2015, 12:22
There are severe symptoms, and, symptoms can increase.

I get puffy from milk and wheat. That's it. Not so bad.

I have Rice Dream at home, for milk in cereal and milk in recipes. I select store-bought bread with malted barley that eases the puffiness symptom. Lately, I tried gluten-free packaged mix for brownies, etal. I have been trying to find out what is it about wheat that is the problem. Spelt is "not a problem".

I have started looking up recipes to make things I like that use wheat, to substitute spelt flour.

It is "only" puffiness, but I have low energy from milk and wheat.

None of this helps backpacking, except over time I have gotten away from everything milk and wheat.

I actually like grits, hominy, barley flake based museli. I like couscous, which is wheat but somehow it is different. Is it durum wheat? I do better with durum wheat.

I am looking into receipes for grits. I am creative about museli.

I like all rice based dishes: main entree, desserts.

I find walnuts are more than okay, but I should avoid cashews for the effect on my tract. I like walnuts, hazelnuts, or blanched almonds.

There is a lot I can do for backpacking with these primary ingredients.

I think you can find such answers.

swjohnsey
01-03-2015, 13:20
Being allergic is fashionable? How did you make it this far being allergic to three very common foods?

Connie
01-03-2015, 13:32
Fashionable?

There are life threatening allergies, and, there are less risk allergies.

I could make breakfast. That's it, so I learned how to cook.

Learning how to cook, the worst that can happen is burning the food. That was my experience.

Everything else, was edible.

In fact, for backpacking I learned how to make biscuits and scones, pan bread and focaccia using spelt flour. Dumplings are easily added to stew or soup.

I had biscuits and gravy for breakfast. If I can do it, anyone can learn.

The only recipe app I have so far, is All Recipes app.

I rely on Search.

It is possible hominy may be okay, if corn isn't.

Hominy is corn, but different.

Corn syrup is common, read ingredients.

No Lactaid, if allergic to penecillin.

swjohnsey
01-03-2015, 14:39
Gluten intolerance is just the latest in a long list of fads.

Connie
01-03-2015, 15:46
I agree. I live near a very small town. One grocery store: Albertson's.

First, flax was in every loaf of bread sold. Now, gluten-free is prominent on the shelves.

squeezebox
01-03-2015, 17:48
Celiac disease ( gluten intolerance) starts showing up in fairly young children, it produces resparatory distress, not GI distress. So if you are 20 + yrs old and suddenly show up with Celiac you're wrong. Most kids die from it by age 20. How much time have you spent in the hospital on IV antibiotics?
Lactos intolerance :The more tropical your ancestors were the more likely you might be lactos intolarent, the more northern European the less likely, again starts young not when you're 30. That's why the make soy infant formula.
And it seems most of this stuff is self diagnosed,

Dogwood
01-03-2015, 19:32
Have you wondered how you made it this far being allergic to these very common foods?

Again, excellent point!


Being allergic is fashionable? How did you make it this far being allergic to three very common foods?

Have to agree 100% again.


Gluten intolerance is just the latest in a long list of fads.

Again, agree, although it may be on the increase or becoming more readily detected which makes me wonder why. Gluten SENSITIVITY affects about 6% of the U.S. population. And that does not mean having some gluten sensitivity equals having Celiac Disease or having a significantly high sensitivity to gluten. Only about 1 in 130 U.S. citizens have Celiac Disease. Seems like someone is pushing some food ideas including those surrounding the ever MASSIVELY popular and PROFITABLE HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL U.S. diet and food industries.

If I wanted to avoid corn products I'd learn to spend 70 % of my time shopping for food in mainstream U.S. grocery stores in the Produce Dept almost exclusively staying away from the highly processed prepackaged dry and frozen food aisles as up to 85% of the food products in U.S. grocery stores contain corn products largely in those type of products. Thank companies like Monsanto for that as they have a national and growing global monopoly on corn through their GM corn patents.

Ground Control, you mentioned being a milk lover extraordinaire, that's specifically COW'S milk, on and off trail. Humans drinking COW'S milk into their adulthood are one of the MAJOR causes of allergies and is implicated in exacerbating or causing other allergic reactions. Every allergists knows this. It's hidden and ignored though by the American Dairy Associations and through extensive lobbying of Gov't oversight groups. Your allergists and you were on the right track IMO when you said: "I believe I have a peanut (or nut) allergy that was exasperated by the heavy GORP intake and it made my sensitivities to corn and milk worse by depleting resources in my gut. (Data from bloodwork shows the the peanut allergy was at 0.3, while the other two were barely above the threshold of 0.1) I probably haven't had it all my life; it likely developed in recent years." Again, this can work in reverse - the milk allergy AND DAIRY CONSUMPTION leading to other allergies AND OTHER health related issues even in otherwise not currently significantly recognized unhealthy individuals. And yes, an allergy to COW'S milk is not the same thing as being lactose intolerance.

There are non dairy non corn product containing dairy alternative to things like COW'S milk and cheese and dairy products derived from COW's milk.
I've seen some less allergic sensitivity when COW'S milk allergic people made the switch to organic GOAT MILK dairy products including no cow product containing GOAT CHEESE. Goat's milk should be tested for your specific allergies pre switching though!

There are definitely coconut milks xanathan and guar gums free.
http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread60447-3.html Read this thread. Sewveral are mentioned.
Here's another specific list of ingredients that can be allergens that you may find extremely helpful by Edwards&Sons who also, but not only, make xanthan gum free coconut products.

Just Tom and The Old Boot were on the right track for you IMO. Don't think in terms of GORP. Change that into trail mixes. With some research, you'll find basically countless alternatives to nuts in trail mixes - SEEDS and corn product and dairy free CAROB being just two.

"It was an expensive and time consuming process that ultimately gave us few real answers. Often the information seemed even contradictory."
I've heard this almost exact statement from countless with allergies that have gone to the western medical community seeking answers on allergies. For some it becomes a black hole of never ending tests and initially mis diagnosed readjusted re-diagnosis.

GOOD LUCK wading through the deep hodgepodge of shart(information) that is media controlled by super large mega influential business interests often with ties to the very products causing allergies.

Dogwood
01-03-2015, 19:38
Forgot the link. http://edwardandsons.com/allergen.itml Check out their Special Diets sublink as well. Even if you don't buy a single Edwards & Sons product it still helps make the bugger picture clearer. As a Foodie I can attest that I like many of their products.

Dogwood
01-03-2015, 20:38
If you're a big cheese fanatic, and depending on you specific milk allergy, you might try sheep milk cheeses. If you're a cheese lover you probably already are as that's what Feta from Greece(may also contain goat milk), Pecorino Romano from Italy, Roquefort from France, and Manchego from Spain are made from.

It's not just the animal the milk or dairy comes from though either. It's how the animal is raised, fed, and its products derived. For some cow milk lovers by making the change to organic or specific cow milks organic in nature fed a free range of natural grasses, what cows normally have grazed upon, I've seen a few with cow's milk allergens quickly have fewer medical issues and, sometimes, the issue disappears seemingly so completely. Even though this is a UK based site, here, is their link that you might explore with your allergists as to their possibilities. http://www.freefromfoodsmatter.com/directories/animal-products.html I know some of these products or quite similar are available in the U.S. Some, right in large main stream U.S. grocery stores.

Seems like a lot though if you find your body inappropriately reacting to otherwise commonly believed harmeless food. It would make me wonder about the entire health of my body including my digestive/intestinal health. MANY in the U.S, have severely compromised and impaired digestive/intestinal health.

Connie
01-03-2015, 21:42
I think our milk, wheat and corn, in this country, are "GMO", and that cow's milk is, reputably, food for Northern Europeans. I think that is the soruce of our "food intolerances" and "allergies".

I am convinced better food, than that, is needed.

I have been enjoying health, I think, because I select authentic food. If I can't find it prepared, and, I usually do not, I prepare it. It turns out these are really simple dishes, or, simple "country cuisine".

Dogwood
01-03-2015, 22:36
Something like 90+ % of the corn and a little less than that of the soy grown in this country has been genetically modified by cell invasion technology. Some scientists, health, and medical groups have raised concerns about genetically modified organisms causing or being correlated with an increase in allergens/allergic reactions or other health related issues. What happens though is when this research is funded, and independent third party unbiased funding isn't abundant in this research area, and released it is quickly massively countered legally and scientifically by those with a pro GMO agenda or by those with ties to the GM purveyors. Proponents of GMOs don't even want the public to be made aware of what is in their food. They regularly fight such labeling laws and only begrudgingly give in when it suits their motivations for power and profit.

Consider, 85% of products in a U.S. grocery store contain corn products. That is not by accident. It is by design surreptitiously foisted upon an unwary public. Information surrounding GMO's is overwhelmingly controlled by the very groups that profit from them. For example, Monsanto controls by GM patents a monopoly of corn production in the U.S. When chemical conglomerates take over the food supply what do you think happens? - MORE CHEMICALS involved in food production. Yet, they largely hide it by flooding informational outlets with misinformation confusing they heck out of the public.

swjohnsey
01-03-2015, 23:58
It's a giant conspiracy. The same folks who are foisting genetically modified foods off on us are keeping the 100 mpg carburetor off the market.

Traveler
01-04-2015, 10:21
Being allergic is fashionable? How did you make it this far being allergic to three very common foods?

People can develop various allergies and/or intolerances at any time in life. Lactose intolerance is probably the most common example of one that develops later in life for a lot of people. Another example being people who had a high threshold of tolerance to poison ivy when young and never seemed to have a reaction. After years of exposures the plant oil will sensitize skin cells and cause reaction in ones immune system. Some allergies are developed over time, others one is born with.

Peanut allergies have spiked fairly recently in the US that has delivered life threatening allergenic reactions. There are foods with additives in our food chain that can cause a reaction with continued exposure that impacts someones sensitivity to the substance.

Ground Control
01-04-2015, 10:22
OP here.

I'm realizing how confusing this thread must be, given the ever-changing information I've gotten from the doctors. Perhaps a short timeline would illuminate and illustrate what I mean by a "time consuming and expensive process that ultimately offered more contradictions than real answers."

Presenting Problem:
I'm seeing the doctor for 2+ months of moderate to severe abdominal pain that followed an inguinal hernia re-repair on 9/2. Once the surgeon opened me up, he saw no hernia recurrence. The source of the pain remains a mystery.

10-24-14
Blood testing says I have 1) Allergies to Milk, Peanuts & Corn and 2)weak positive for Celiac Disease. I immediately discontinue eating all of these products and there derivatives - no small task given corn derivatives!

11-11-14
I see an allergist who performs a food allergy panel scratch test, supposedly more reliable than the previous blood test. This test yields 14 food allergies in my regular diet, but not milk. (14!) "Milk must have been a false positive," he says. My new supposed allergies are corn, tomatoes, oranges, white potatoes, soybeans, green peppers, raspberries, peanuts, cashews, pistachios, almonds, coconuts, peas, cucumbers. The allergist explains that my body has quite possibly built up antibodies to each/any of these 14 foods, and we'll have to find out about each one with an elimination diet.

He advises me to get an upper endoscopy, and to eat a LOT of gluten leading up to this test so that any reaction could be noted.

I'm absolutely baffled by the new list of 14. All are items I consumed regularly. (yes, swjohnny, I've wondered...) My family and I all want an answer to my problem so badly, we are adhering to the advice and dramatically alter our meals, cabinets, shopping lists.

I immediately begin an intense elimination diet. I remove all 14 foods from my diet for ten days, and then re-introduce them one by one, 2 servings of each supposed allergen for 3 day spans, logging the results in a food journal.

12-16-14
Upper endoscopy performed, no evidence of Celiac disease. (This contradicts the earlier blood test.) So that Gluten-Free Christmass was all for nothing?

01-4-15 (today)
I have now worked through 12 of the 14 items on the elimination diet, and NONE of them have registered a reaction from me.

I've spent (wasted?) the last 72 days fettering out these supposed food allergies. I believe they have been successfully ruled out as the possible source of the pain that keeps me from living a normal life. Up next for me is a Barium Swallow test. I'm frustrated and concerned.

------

I'm not sure if I'd call food allergy testing a "conspiracy," but perhaps a "racket."

Again, I realize some folks have serious food allergies to nuts and shellfish that are a major health concern. But there are also a large number of people who, like me, were led to misdiagnosis through medical testing that is often little more than educated guesswork; testing with a high margin or error.

I believe there is cause for concern related to the homogenization of our food source and how this may affect humans. (GMOs)

I would caution anyone that does not have the most severe reaction to supposed food allergies or gluten intolerance to invest themselves heavily in such diagnosis.

Offshore
01-04-2015, 10:38
Celiac disease ( gluten intolerance) starts showing up in fairly young children, it produces resparatory distress, not GI distress. So if you are 20 + yrs old and suddenly show up with Celiac you're wrong.

This is completely wrong.

While there is some childhood-onset celiac disease, celiac disease can manifest itself at any age. Celiac symptoms include recurring abdominal bloating and pain, chronic or recurrent diarrhea, constipation, nausea or emesis, liver and biliary tract disorders, weight loss, pale, foul-smelling stool, iron-deficiency anemia unresponsive to iron therapy, fatigue, failure to thrive or short stature, delayed puberty, arthralgia, tingling numbness in the legs, pale sores inside the mouth, dermatitis herpetiformis, abnormal dentition (tooth discoloration, loss of enamel), unexplained infertility or recurrent miscarriage, osteopenia or osteoporosis, peripheral neuropathy, psychiatric disorders (anxiety or depression), and increased risk of lymphoma. So you see, it is much more than "resparatory" distress.

To learn some actual facts about celiac disease, take a look at the University of Chicago Celiac Center site http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/

Offshore
01-04-2015, 10:50
OP here.
12-16-14
Upper endoscopy performed, no evidence of Celiac disease. (This contradicts the earlier blood test.)

That's actually pretty common. The typical diagnosis methodology of celiac is to first run the gluten antibody blood tests and if they are positive, follow with a endoscopy with a biopsy of the villi. A positive blood test results in only a presumptive diagnosis. The actual diagnosis is made upon a pathology exam of the biopsied villi from the small intestine lining. Given your equivocal positive blood test, it was appropriate to go forward with the endoscopy, but not unusual that it was negative.

Connie
01-04-2015, 10:59
In any surgery there are cut nerve pathways. It is likely a small but sensitive nerve pathway has been severed. It can reroute and reconnect, however that requires rest and recovery, not strain. That would be my guess.

I had a surgery, an appendectomy: three months later the scar stretched, simply reaching to the lower shelf of a kitchen cabinent.

I was slow to heal, from that kind of cut thru the layers of skin and tissue, while surface cuts and scrapes had always healed quickly.

Your surgery may need more time for healing.

The transient allergy-sensitivities may be attributed to a stressed system, working hard to heal the surgery.

"R&R" Rest and Recovery: be active when your energy is restless to do things, and then, "take it easy" and be found resting when energy wanes.

If "hard work" and "pushing thru pain" and "no pain - no gain" or "take a pain pill" and "fix me doctor" is your motto, get a new philosophy.

Those hard-driving ideas are not helpful for recovery from injury.

Just Tom
01-04-2015, 11:29
Wow, lots of stuff going on in this thread.

There is a difference between a food sensitivity and intolerance and a food allergy, but it does not negate the fact that the one suffering either has valid reasons to look for alternate backpacking foods. It is a great topic to have a few posts on, if we can take out the anecdotes, opinions, and competing (pseudo) scientific claims. Whether it is food intolerance, food allergy, medical condition (diabetes), religious, or lifestyle choice, these can create difficulties in assembling your backpacking menu. And these are things that I think are worth asking about on here to gain from group experience.

Gracie
01-04-2015, 11:47
yes, I am concerned that my intolerance to gluten will become an issue on the trail. Everyone tells me to just prepare with my own food, etc. but it would be nice to be able to go into a town to eat with other hikers once in awhile or partake of trail magic offerings. As someone who has done plenty of trail magic over the years, I always be sure to have gluten free foods available for hikers who may have the same food issues as I do. I'm hoping more trail angels will consider having gluten free offerings available. :)

Gracie
01-04-2015, 11:48
Gluten intolerance is certainly NOT a fad. It is a very real issue for me and many other people. Believe me, life would be so much easier if I could eat what everyone else does.

Offshore
01-04-2015, 18:37
Gluten intolerance is certainly NOT a fad. It is a very real issue for me and many other people. Believe me, life would be so much easier if I could eat what everyone else does.

Gluten intolerance and celiac aren't fads, but the gluten free diet is - most people on it are self-diagnosed and have no medically indicated reason for it. Having celiac, I find the current popularity of gluten free to be a bit of a double edged sword. On one hand, gluten free prepared foods are easier to come by, but on the other, people assume that I'm just doing it as a fad diet and get annoyed when I hold the line. It gets pretty old.

Good to Go http://goodto-go.com (based in Maine) has gluten free backpacking meals that meet the new FDA labelling requirement of tested to below a detection limit of 20 ppm and are absolutely delicious. I use them on the trail all the time and even keep some in the office for when I'm stuck there late and ordering a pizza isn't an option. When the FDA regulations for gluten free labeling first came out in August 2014, I got in touch with the major dehydrated backpacking food manufacturers to see if they met the requirements and none did. Good to Go does - the owner is a professional chef and really knows what she's doing.

Bati
01-04-2015, 21:46
Send plenty of mail drops including things like lentils and quinoa since they can be more difficult to find in stores. Pre-pack spice mixes so that you're not eating the same thing every day. Substitute sunflower and pumpkin seeds for nuts. Dehydrate tons of veggies (or look for just tomatoes types of dehydated food) and make your own fruit leather (or find organic or near-organic brands). Send dark chocolate to yourself if you can't find it along the trail
Include a "heavy" dinner and breakfast in your mail drop if you need to, so you can cook a nice meal that you wouldn't have on the trail if you can't find one at restaurant (in most trail towns you likely won't find a good meal.) Eat your dinner, then head out with your hiker friends and chow down on a side salad with a slice of lemon for dressing along with a glass of wine to match their pizza and beer.

You will need someone packing your mail drops and adjusting them as you hike; don't try to set up each one before you leave or you'll end up sick of eating the same thing every time.

Most of all, figure out what you can eat before you hike, then figure out how to get it in a lightweight form in a mail drop (or occasionally at a small grocery store.)

sarbar
01-08-2015, 13:05
An allergy can show up at ANY time in life. Anytime. So please do not think it is "fashionable". Yeesh.

My youngest son has severe, and not so severe allergies to food. His ones to cashews and peanuts is life threatening (hence, we carry Epi-Pens for him). His allergies to wheat, eggs and dairy are milder - they cause severe eczema, which is no fun ride I can assure you, but hey, at least it won't kill him. Sigh.

Anyhow, after much testing and doctor appointments, we have it mostly figured out and knock on wood, no ER visits since he was 16 months old (he will be 3 in February). We overhauled our entire way of eating due to this. Now having said that....allergist doctors have been trying to point out that secondary allergies to nuts and peanuts is growing (as to wheat, as well), once a family quits eating them - then when they do eat it, they can have an allergic reaction.

Something I noticed about myself: After we banned PB in the house, I felt better. I used to eat PB a lot for lunch, and often would have a flushed face after eating it. So, do I a minor allergy? I don't know. But I do not eat ANY peanuts now to be safe.

Anyhow, Alistaire is actually more allergic to cashews - that one I was actually bummed over!

So...I make nearly all of his food from scratch. I have to be so careful. Eating out is a huge issue - but I always ask nicely - I have to know what they fry food in. There have been sadly many meals where all he eats is french fries :( There are brands I do trust - Enjoy Life is a huge one. Sunbutter is another. I love The Sneaky Chef's No-Nut Butter as well. Read every label. Never, ever buy bulk foods.

sarbar
01-08-2015, 13:14
Btw, if anyone wants to see what Anaphylaxis looks like AFTER an Epi-Pen (15 minutes out) plus allergy meds? This is our youngest son.
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