PDA

View Full Version : 2014 REI Quarterdome 1??



LogHiking
11-25-2014, 16:30
Hey All,

I'm a light weight gear guy edging toward ultralight sometimes but not quite at the cuben fiber level yet. Mostly just tarps and bivys and keeping things under 1.5 lbs. Recently my girlfriend has been getting more interested in backpacking with our two medium sized dogs so I ended up picking up the REI Half Dome 2 plus and for this purpose it is great. A little heavier with thicker flooring and other materials which is welcomed weight when bringing dogs. Less than 3lbs each on short girlfriend and puppy friendly hikes is no problem. After spending a couple nights in it, it made me realize I likely find some aspects of tenting worth the added weight in certain conditions. I could very much see myself taking a good one man tent on a 3-5 day trip in a buggy area where rain is expected some of the time as the overall process is easier and more comfy in a tent with those conditions.

I ran across the REI Quarterdome 1 and overall I like a lot about it. Given the specs there are lighter 1 man tents out there, but it is competitive, especially at the price. I was surprised to see that it didn't come up in any search here or at BPL so I wanted to ask if anyone had one or had any relevant thoughts on it?

http://www.rei.com/product/862421/rei-quarter-dome-1-tent#tab-reviews

At 2lbs 10 ounces packaged weight, I figure by replacing the stakes, guy, and stuff sacks with my lighter and better stuff I could drop that down to 2 lbs 5-7 ounces quite easily. The size seems to be pretty spacious based on REI and youtube reviews. At 6ft 2 in I really appreciate that. I'm also interested in the Tarptent contrail but the edge is leaning toward REI QD 1 due to the semi free standing design and that I can't actually sit up in the contrail. I would prefer a full free standing tent while going this direction, but the semi seems to be adequate and not a ton of staking is required to get this thing sturdy. I don't have serious reservations about using alternative staking methods for a small amount of stakes, would just hate trying to set up an 8-10 stake tarp on granite or some other difficult to stake surface.

So basically I'd be looking to take this along on some longer trips where both wet weather and bugs are a potential concern and I'd be willing to add a little weigh to my set up (This tent would bring my base weight (for me everything but food and water) to a couple ounces over 12lbs, so it isn't killing me there. I like trying to shave every ounce I can for some load outs, I think its fun. But my general rule is I can do anything as long as my base weight is under 15lbs.

My biggest concern is by specs and and price I would think this tent would be popular among this crowd, considering it isn't and I haven't even seen it talked about, I'm figuring there is a reason why that I'm missing.

Thank you in advance for any input or alternative suggestions you may have. Also just an fyi, as this is far from a necessity for me and more of a luxury add on to my arsenal of shelters, price is a bigger driving point than normal for me. Being able to try out a solo tent for 200 bucks and being able to take it back if I decide it isn't for me is one of the below the surface perks that also has me leaning toward the QD1.

Thanks again!

Franco
11-25-2014, 17:44
Re :your comment about not being able to sit up in the Contrail..That REI tent has a peak height (the pointy bit) of 37.5" , the Contrail has that at 45"
(also under the pointy bit) .
So I would think that if you can sit up under the REI tent , you can under the Contrail too.
BTW you can set up the Contrail at 48" if you like.
But of course they are completely different shelters so you need to chose the one you like.
If you use trekking poles the Notch can handle 6'5" guys, same for the Rainbow if you don't.


http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=78446
[email protected]

HooKooDooKu
11-25-2014, 17:51
I personally do not like cramped tents... and I find 1-man tents to be too cramped for 1 man.

When it comes to a 2-man trip, I want a 'real' 2-man tent such as REI Half Dome 2 Plus, REQ Quarter Dome T2 Plus, Kelty Gunnison 2.2.
These tents have quoted sizes of things like 98x56, 94x54, and 93x57.

Typical 2-man tents like the REI Quarter Dome, Marmont Limelite, Big Agnes Copper Spur UL 2 and have quoted sizes of things like 90x54, 88x55, and 84x50. I consider these to be too small for comfort as 2-man tents, but are great spacious tents for a 1-man tent.

I personally carry the Copper Spur UL2 as my 1-man tent (but only because I got a great clearance deal).

Franco
11-25-2014, 18:08
An 84" floor can offer more usable space than one at 90" or even 92".
It depends on how much inward slope or not you have on the walls.

LogHiking
11-25-2014, 18:17
Re :your comment about not being able to sit up in the Contrail..That REI tent has a peak height (the pointy bit) of 37.5" , the Contrail has that at 45"
(also under the pointy bit) .
So I would think that if you can sit up under the REI tent , you can under the Contrail too.
BTW you can set up the Contrail at 48" if you like.
But of course they are completely different shelters so you need to chose the one you like.
If you use trekking poles the Notch can handle 6'5" guys, same for the Rainbow if you don't.


http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=78446
[email protected]


Thanks. I was simply going by Henry telling me sitting up would be a problem in the contrail based on my height and reading a review of the REI tent from a user an inch taller than me saying he could. Admittedly I have no first hand experience with either and didn't look into the measurements enough before stating that. I'll try the REI one out sooner than later and hopefully have a better idea about that. The notch does look very nice and Henry did recommend that to me, but I only use one pole and even that I don't always use any poles so that kind of rules out the notch for me.

LogHiking
11-25-2014, 18:20
I personally do not like cramped tents... and I find 1-man tents to be too cramped for 1 man.

When it comes to a 2-man trip, I want a 'real' 2-man tent such as REI Half Dome 2 Plus, REQ Quarter Dome T2 Plus, Kelty Gunnison 2.2.
These tents have quoted sizes of things like 98x56, 94x54, and 93x57.

Typical 2-man tents like the REI Quarter Dome, Marmont Limelite, Big Agnes Copper Spur UL 2 and have quoted sizes of things like 90x54, 88x55, and 84x50. I consider these to be too small for comfort as 2-man tents, but are great spacious tents for a 1-man tent.

I personally carry the Copper Spur UL2 as my 1-man tent (but only because I got a great clearance deal).


Yea I am aware that people are all over the map with regard to the sizing issue. I would have to actually get in the thing to know for sure, but based on the usable space provided via the unique pole design it looks to be enough room for me based on what I've seen in videos and pictures and such. I'm used to bivys and micro tarps so I expect it to feel like a palace in that regard.

Franco
11-25-2014, 19:00
Log Hiking,
Yes try out that REI for size . (no the Contrail is not ideal either , still it has more headroom)

You can get two strong poles for the Notch for 8oz for the pair.
Called Vertical Support poles, 0.0490", $16x2 (under Extras)
With those it is still about 6 oz lighter, more headroom but more expensive than the REI one.
Because of your wet weather, an advantage of the Notch is that it sets up fly inner together and with the two doors you can get better views/ventilation and can often leave one door open even when raining.
If by any chance you can cook inside the tent , that is easy to do in the Notch by unhooking the inner , you then have a shaped tarp...
(I don't need to do that with the Caldera Cone or JetBoil, they work in the vestibule all zipped up.
Another time I'll tell you the good bits of that REI tent.
[email protected]

juma
11-25-2014, 19:26
you can get fibraplex carbon fiber poles and lose about half the rei's current tent pole weight.

there are probably more folks using that tent than you think. they just have no reason to talk about it in the ever lighter gear banter on WB.

LogHiking
11-25-2014, 19:43
Log Hiking,
Yes try out that REI for size . (no the Contrail is not ideal either , still it has more headroom)

You can get two strong poles for the Notch for 8oz for the pair.
Called Vertical Support poles, 0.0490", $16x2 (under Extras)
With those it is still about 6 oz lighter, more headroom but more expensive than the REI one.
Because of your wet weather, an advantage of the Notch is that it sets up fly inner together and with the two doors you can get better views/ventilation and can often leave one door open even when raining.
If by any chance you can cook inside the tent , that is easy to do in the Notch by unhooking the inner , you then have a shaped tarp...
(I don't need to do that with the Caldera Cone or JetBoil, they work in the vestibule all zipped up.
Another time I'll tell you the good bits of that REI tent.
[email protected]

Thank you for the insight Franco. I was unaware of the poles being an adequate substitute. I do worry a bit that on your site it says trekking poles are still preferred, but it does open me up to thinking about it again. I've also started looking at the rainbow option. As it works fully staked but if I do decide I want two trekking poles it can be made free standing that way. That is an interesting thing I will have to think about a bit more.

No teasing though you have to tell me what you like about the REI QD1 asap :)

Thanks again!

LogHiking
11-25-2014, 19:51
you can get fibraplex carbon fiber poles and lose about half the rei's current tent pole weight.

there are probably more folks using that tent than you think. they just have no reason to talk about it in the ever lighter gear banter on WB.

That is a good piece of insight thank you. I had no idea about the fibraplex carbon fiber poles but if they can make them for the QD1 that may push me further toward it depending on the end number of weight saved. And yes that makes sense regarding people using it but not reviewing it. I guess that is what I was hoping to hear, people coming out and saying they or their buddies are using it with success.

I understand it not being made of cuben and it being semi free standing it isn't as sexy around a place like this. Funny thing is spending more time lurking at BPL than here I was beginning to think if your shelter weighed more than a pound and a half you were a worthless hiker (being facetious of course) but it wasn't untill coming here and reading up a lot more that I see the people out there actually hiking the miles and spending the nights are generally less concerned about getting extreme with the weight and just go "light enough" rather than as "light as possible". I found that to be a refreshing point of view and is one of if not the main reasons I'm opening myself up to a tent for my personal use.

Thanks for the insight and if you have any friends with the QD1 please send them this thread's way ;)

Franco
11-25-2014, 20:31
At TT we have two type of poles for non pole users.
The "substitute poles" around 2 oz each and the "Vertical Poles" around 4oz each.
The heavier ones are MUCH stiffer , similar to the LW trekking poles.

I am with TT so of course I am telling you the good bits of our shelters.
Of late I have been using the Notch because it works well for me.

johnnybgood
11-25-2014, 21:20
Having arrived at this thread a tad late I won't reiterate the negatives about the QD1, for they are true. I have an older version of this REI tent, a 2010 model which actually weighs 4 oz. more.
Like previously mentioned , a lighter carbon fiber pole can shave off a few ounces .

Now the positives on the REI Q1 ; It is a well constructed tent that while not roomy holds up extremely well in rainy weather .

* It has enough of a vestible to keep your stuff , pack included , shielded from the outside elements.
* It's easy to set up and being basically freestanding can be set up using only a trekking pole for the rainfly.
* Inexpensive shelter that is well designed and reliable .

LogHiking
11-25-2014, 21:57
Having arrived at this thread a tad late I won't reiterate the negatives about the QD1, for they are true. I have an older version of this REI tent, a 2010 model which actually weighs 4 oz. more.
Like previously mentioned , a lighter carbon fiber pole can shave off a few ounces .

Now the positives on the REI Q1 ; It is a well constructed tent that while not roomy holds up extremely well in rainy weather .

* It has enough of a vestible to keep your stuff , pack included , shielded from the outside elements.
* It's easy to set up and being basically freestanding can be set up using only a trekking pole for the rainfly.
* Inexpensive shelter that is well designed and reliable .


Thanks that is very helpful. I did notice that the specs for the earlier model were a little heavier and smaller inside, so it appears they addressed at least some of the negatives. Would you mind expanding on what you mean by using only a trekking pole for the rainfly? Thanks!

johnnybgood
11-25-2014, 22:22
The front entry is the rain fly which get staked out . I use a trekking pole in the grommet to do this if the ground isn't hard . I will use at least 4 stakes and the trekking pole if setting up in an open area exposed to wind.

LogHiking
11-26-2014, 13:42
The front entry is the rain fly which get staked out . I use a trekking pole in the grommet to do this if the ground isn't hard . I will use at least 4 stakes and the trekking pole if setting up in an open area exposed to wind.

I unfortunately am unsure what you mean, but that is surely a product of my inexperience with this model and this tent style in general and not your explanation, so no biggie there. I appreciate your input.

I would still like to hear from users of this tent if there are any out there but ultimately think I've gathered enough info via this thread and other research to go to REI and get a feel for it. If I like the size and the weight checks out there is a good chance I will give it a try.

Franco
11-26-2014, 19:35
Henry Shire just uploaded a new video clip comparing the Moment DW with the Notch and the StratoSpire 1.
Only about 2.5 min but very informative.
Henry is 5'10"
Under :
http://www.tarptent.com/ttvideos.html

Brvhrt
11-26-2014, 22:11
I used the REI Quarterdome 1 on my AT and LT thru-hikes this year. It seemed like a good deal to me because of the reasonable weight and price. I also wondered why I never heard of anyone using it as I was researching gear, but figured if it didn't work out I could return it. By then, maybe I would have had a chance to see other tents in use on the trail and know what I really wanted. Almost surprisingly, I have no complaints about it. I am only 5'4," but it seemed plenty big enough for me. I kept my pack at my feet and had room to put gear on both sides at the head end of the tent.

UofWHusky
11-26-2014, 23:59
I used the REI Quarterdome T1 on my AT hike and liked it. I have the 2012 model. I liked it because I could set up the mesh liner inside AT shelters if I wanted a bug screen. My TT Moment DW is way too long for that. I am 6 foot tall, 165# and had no problems inside the tent. I could bring my pack inside and stand it up in the corner of the tent by my head leaning against the support pole by the door and it would not interfere with my sleeping.

LogHiking
11-28-2014, 09:35
Thanks all. I no longer have serious reservations about the QD1. I'm looking forward to trying one soon!

LogHiking
12-03-2014, 18:49
I just got back from testing the QD1 at REI and there was a lot to like. Everything was well put together and obviously I like a lot of the features. It was easy to set up and the total package was small enough for my liking, although big compared to my usual stuff. Width wise it was great for a 1 person as I use a large thermarest and had a good chunk of room in there on either side. It would be snug but I could fit me and my pups in there no problem. Height wise I was able to sit up reasonably well. I probably had to scrunch an inch or two in the process of getting up but it was fine by me. Also it stands just fine by itself, which is part of the reason I wanted to try a "free standing" tent in the first place. So that is a positive. I hike in a lot of rocky terrain and not having to be super picky about a lot of stake locations brings a smile to my face.

My biggest concern is that despite having enough floor space to fit me, I also have size 13 feet and my toes grazed the end of the tent at the foot end. This isn't an immediate deal breaker for a couple reasons that I'll explain, but I also need some input from you good people.

1. It didnt affect my comfort at all as it was very light contact(I put my exact pad in there while testing also).
2. I rarely if ever sleep straight on my back. Most of my sleep is a slightly bunch but not full fetal side sleep with some semi sprawled out stomach sleeping thrown in there. And those positions were fine.
3. It was touching nylon as opposed to mesh, which from a long term durability perspective seems like a plus, but I do have some questions here.

What are the condensation ramifications of my feet grazing the end of the tent on nylon some of the time? As most of us know in a single wall tent or tarp touching the wall can make for a wet sleeping bag. But I have very little double wall experience and really have no idea what to expect. Is that grazing of my foot going to mean instant moisture? Or will the double wall keep it at bay for the most part, especially considering I wont be touching the end all that much and I'm hitting nylon as opposed to mesh?

Anyway I quite like the tent, and most of the decision points are where I need them to be, with the exception of this one. I just don't know how serious of an issue it is if it is an issue at all. Any insight on the subject is greatly appreciated!

LogHiking
12-03-2014, 18:53
Also something to add is it wasn't staked out fully. My girlfriend was pulling the two front stake out points but we both thought I would have had slightly more room if it was properly staked out as she couldn't hold it perfectly even and fully extended for any actual time.