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Joe Rogowski
12-04-2014, 18:45
So after watching a lot of gear videos and getting advice from you guys I have everything I think I need my base weight is 16lbs any suggestions on stuff I missed would be appreciated. Leaving March 20th
Nexpak HB002 w bag liner 70L
2L Platypus
2 water bottles
Sawyer mini
Alcohol stove
Heet
3 cup pot
Wind screen DIY
2 mini bics
pocket knife
spoon
Black diamond spot headlamp
Therm-a-rest sack
Kelty gran mesa 2
Kelty gran mesa 2 footprint
2 pairís exoffici boxers
Exofficio long tee 2 short sleeve (camp shirt)
2 pairs of long johns (hike/sleep)
3 pairs darn tough socks (2 hike/1 camp)
Running shorts
north face tka 100 fleece
frogg toggs rain pants probably cut to knee length or not bring
North face venture jacket
Gaiters
Maxpedition edc (med kit/notebook/hygiene)
Youngstown winter work gloves (waterproof/windproof/very warm)
Big Agnes insulated air core
Sea to summit food bag w rope
Eboot 5000mAh charger
Black diamond trail ergo cork
Sea to summit pack cover
Underground 20 degree down quilt
Salomon discovery gtx boots
galaxy s4

jred321
12-05-2014, 12:14
Seems pretty good. Something to consider as the date gets closer is how many warm layers you'll need. Depending on the year and how the winter goes it could be more or less. I'm not finalizing what I'm taking with me for clothing until closer to departure

freightliner
12-05-2014, 12:49
Nailed it good job only thing I can see there that you don't have listed or maybe you forgot is just hat to sleep in

TomN
12-05-2014, 14:49
Warm Hat, Sunscreen (I skipped it last trip and got burned), pot lid, something to use under your sleeping pad in a shelter

Joe Rogowski
12-05-2014, 18:07
Thanks for the replies. Yea i forgot i have a winter beanie, if i stay in the shelters ill just use my tent footprint, and i work outside in Florida so ill be fine with the sun

takethisbread
12-05-2014, 18:17
1. Sawyer mini sux, get the full size it's like 1oz more
2. One Vic is enough, it'll get you a long way
3. 2 pairs boxers 2 pairs long johns. ? Seems excessive. That's 4 pieces of clothing and I had none of these.
4. Boots. That usually isn't the best, but go for it.
5. There is no final gear list. It's changing as you walk. I don't weigh my gear, but I know I carried less than most.
6. Hyoh !!


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Chair-man
12-05-2014, 18:26
Am I missing something? I don't see a down coat or parka only a 100 weight fleece.

takethisbread
12-05-2014, 18:33
Am I missing something? I don't see a down coat or parka only a 100 weight fleece.

U are missing something it's there


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hazmat
12-05-2014, 18:49
Hi Joe, Your list is very similar to mine and that is re-assuring. I'm leaving on the 17th, I guess we'll see how well we did. I am considering taking my microspikes even though they add to the weight. Might be worth it though.

Regards,
hazmat

TomN
12-05-2014, 19:02
I find a down jacket very useful in camp at night

colorado_rob
12-05-2014, 20:01
I find a down jacket very useful in camp at night
I do as well, a 100 wt fleece just isn't enough for me in the spring. There are a bunch of 6-7 ounce down "sweaters" out there, I carry a Montbell, I think 6.5 ounces, and put it on both at camp at night and first thing in the morning (but it comes off when I hit the trail). That's the only "flaw" I see in your list.

freightliner
12-05-2014, 20:49
I was a down man for years but recently I've changed over to the Montbell Thermawrap which I can use while hiking. It is a couple ounces heavier but it's the same warmth and it washes up better. I was going to suggest a down jacket too but he's got three shirts two longjohns the fleece and a jacket. I don't really think he is going to be cold. There are things that he's probably missing and gonna wish he had. Some of the things I could think of is an ass pad firestarter(something more than a lighter) and a water tank so you only have to go to the spring once. They are luxury items so I would never say to take them just think about it.

Joe Rogowski
12-06-2014, 00:08
I usually stay pretty warm im originally from new jersey and i wore the fleece and jacket i have in to 5 degree weather so i think ill be good if not ill have one sent to me i have a fire starter and a buff as well that i forgot to mention.

Chair-man
12-06-2014, 01:47
I usually stay pretty warm im originally from new jersey and i wore the fleece and jacket i have in to 5 degree weather so i think ill be good if not ill have one sent to me i have a fire starter and a buff as well that i forgot to mention.

You may very well see 5 degree weather so that's great you can stay warm with a light fleece and a Venture rain jacket in those temps. I guess everyone's different and like you said, if you do get cold, you can always have one mailed to you. Just hope you don't die from hypothermia while you're waiting for your mail drop.

TomN
12-06-2014, 10:48
Or just get in your sleeping bag

Connie
12-06-2014, 11:22
I can be very comfortable, active. Sitting in a campsite, I get cold. You do not?

For me, it is either a down belay jacket and even bib overalls for hunting, or, get in my sleep system.

CarlZ993
12-06-2014, 11:36
My $0.02: I'd go w/ the larger Sawyer Squeeze rather than the mini. Lots of people complaint about the slow flow of the mini (regardless, keep the filter inside your sleeping bag @ night in the beginning so it doesn't freeze & turn into a paperweight; fyi - I used Aquamira drops & was pleased with them). I'd ditch the second pair of long johns & upgrade my thermal jacket. I used a 100 wt fleece vest as hiking insulation along w/ a 3 oz wind jacket & was fine for hiking in the mid-teens (I sent both home when it warmed up some). I used a Montbell Thermarest (synthetic) jacket for camp warmth (note: I started on 3/21 & was surprised how cold it was in 2013). I wouldn't cut the pants legs of my Frogg Toggs. At least until it warmed up considerably. I'd consider a lighter tent (1-person; Big Agnes or one of the single-wall tarp tent of cuben fiber - if you can afford it - or silnylon).

Regardless of what you take at the beginning, you have some chances to add or subtract gear in the early going (Neels Gap, Franklin, etc.). Best of luck on your hike.

q-tip
12-06-2014, 11:41
+ on camp jacket. I froze my buns off between Springer and Neels Gap, got a Mont Bell X lite and it saved the day (actually the nite) . 6.0 oz.

1azarus
12-06-2014, 12:32
i suggest you keep the legs on your frogg togg pants until it gets a bit warmer, then cut them off -- or throw them out. they really do help keep you warm in camp. ...and try stuffing your sleeping bag inside your jacket, with the hood over your head. if it fits, free warmth in camp.

colorado_rob
12-07-2014, 12:58
I was a down man for years but recently I've changed over to the Montbell Thermawrap which I can use while hiking. It is a couple ounces heavier but it's the same warmth and it washes up better.The Thermawrap is an excellent choice. I own and use extensively both the MB Thermawrap and the UL down sweater, as Fl says, the Thermawrap is exactly 2 ounces heavier (at least mine, both men's Large), and can indeed be worn hiking whereas the down version is just too darn warm to do so in most conditions (and certainly all conditions back east March-November, IMHO). The only thing I disagree with is that the down version is a bit puffier and it is warmer.

freightliner
12-07-2014, 13:26
The Thermawrap is an excellent choice. I own and use extensively both the MB Thermawrap and the UL down sweater, as Fl says, the Thermawrap is exactly 2 ounces heavier (at least mine, both men's Large), and can indeed be worn hiking whereas the down version is just too darn warm to do so in most conditions (and certainly all conditions back east March-November, IMHO). The only thing I disagree with is that the down version is a bit puffier and it is warmer.

Yes I agree with you that a down jacket is like a hug from an angel. The thing is spending so much time around camp fires and washing it so many times that when it was time to replace it I made the tough choice to go with a thermawrap. It seems to be more bulletproof. The one thing I do like about it the most is I can wear it out of camp when it's so cold in the morning.

xrayextra
12-08-2014, 17:52
Kelty gran mesa 2 footprint
galaxy s4On the footprint I'd leave that behind and find some Tyvak. Footprints are heavy. If you pass by a construction site building a new home, look for Tyvak scraps. (Be sure to ask first.) You should be able to find one big enough for your tent without much trouble. They're super lightweight and work better than a footprint.

For the Galaxy S4, do you have spare batteries? I recommend two spares. They're relatively cheap (around $10 each) and worth their weight in gold when you need them. What about charger and cables?

Do you have dry sacks? I recommend Sea to Summit in various sizes. Some people like to use a single trash can liner bag but I prefered to use dry sacks. Everything packs better and it's easier to keep track of things in your backpack. Get different colors so you can color code them. I had med stuff in a small green one, electronics in a small blue one, clothes in a larger green one, used the Exped Schnozzle bag as a dry bag for my sleeping bag and had a spare for miscellaneous wet items (wet tent fly in the morning to dry out later on the trail during lunch breaks, wet socks, etc to keep them separate).

What about a camera? I definitely don't recommend relying on your phone as a camera because you'll be reluctant to take pictures if the battery is low, and even reluctant to take a lot of pictures because you don't want your battery to drain. I highly recommend a good waterproof camera. I used an Olympus TG-1. It is waterproof, has GPS, and is shockproof (you can drop it from a height of six feet and no problems). It takes terrific pictures too! (I took over 6000.)

Good luck on your trip!

Flatfoot

p.s. If you're not yet sick of trail videos I have one up on YouTube. http://youtu.be/TlnUW8YNqDo

Texaco
12-10-2014, 21:06
Here are my thoughts:

1) Sawyer full size.. mini sucks.
2) No need for 2 pairs of long johns. Your hiking clothes will quickly become your camp clothes, shy perhaps of a different shirt
3) MORE SOCKS. Can't stress this enough. By the time I got to Katahdin I was carrying 5 pairs of socks. Yes it seemed excessive to many but my feet stayed in great shape throughout my hike despite long and hard days. Also, at one point when a friend needed a pair emergently, I was able to lose one without issue. They will become... crispy... having multiple pairs will allow one or two pairs to dry on my pack.
4) No need for rain pants
5) I was an April 4 start. I took a mid-layer North Face, and a Marmot rain shell. Even in days of 20 degree temps and crazy wind/snow, that combination was perfect. Looks like you're in the same range, so that should work!

Just my $0.02! Good luck!

Kiteman
01-02-2015, 06:21
Like your 2 cents :)

Connie
01-02-2015, 07:59
I think an ordinary pack cover is inadequate, if you get any real rain.

I like the Heart Fire Gear Rain Hoodie, because it covers the top of the pack where the shoulder straps attach to the backpack. This keeps water from entering there. It is on my list to purchase.

Footprint: Even lightweight and tough "Kite Tyvek" is bulky. I like Gossamer Gear polycryo ground cloth. Tough. Lightweight. Low volume - no bulk.

Maxpedition EDC: I don't think so. Backpackers have either packcloth, silnylon, cuben, or a small mesh bag with drawstring closure at the top, a ziplock bag, or pockets. It's a backpacking thing. I was active duty military. Now, I am a backpacker.

Wet gear: if you put a mesh bag outside the pack, inside the elastic cord, you can dry gear there, or, at least keep the wet tarp, tent, or footprint from inside your backpack. If no mesh bag, clip each item to the pack. While walking things fall out on the trail unnoticed.

ShamWow will absorb most water, after you shake as much water off that gear as possible, folding or rolling the dry side inside. See if you don't like an "extra" silnylon tarp to keep heavy rain off the tent, if there is heavy rain. Keep that tarp on the outside of the pack, inside the elastic cord attached to the backpack with a tiny "carabiner" clip. It will be good to stand around out of the rain, if you have an "extra" tarp to rig high enough to stand up and walk around. Otherwise, it is a real trick to keep from bringing the wet inside. Keep footwear off the inside of the tent. The tent vestibule is for wet clothing and wet gear. If you have an "extra" tarp, you can hang your wet clothing. Bring lightweight cordage like that sold at ZPacks accessories.

All that goes without saying, if you are experienced. Sit inside, feet outside: take off shoes. It may be you will not have real rain. But I have read at this forum 1 day out of 3 was rain. Maybe someone will comment?

Tent: 5 lb. tent gets "old" real fast. Maybe you will like a lightweight tarp, TiGoat bivy and Bug Baffler headnet, for example, after more than a few trail miles. Maybe not. [edit: The Kelty Ranger Tarp requires only the polycryo ground cloth for a "bombproof" design at 2.5 lbs.]

Layers: I hope those longjohns aren't cotton or cotton blend thermals. Never sweat in your clothing layers - cotton will hold on to sweat.

Footwear: consider low-cut hiking shoes, maybe Simblissity stretch gaiters to keep out dirt and debris. This will reduce your load by thousands of lbs. because you pick up your feet thousands of times.

comanche8f
01-02-2015, 09:46
Not really that big of a deal where gear is concerned, but you said you were taking the galaxy s4. I would recommend upgrading to the s5 if you can. You can keep the battery going for 3 or more days, better pics and panorama views, and is water proof. It also links with the fit bands, I am wearing a garmin vivofit since the battery lasts for a year, I want to see how many steps I take when I thru hike in march.