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Skye15
01-09-2015, 10:53
I was having a conversation with a fellow hiker last night and she brought up a couple stories where friends of hers woke up the next morning with gear missing. I haven't seen anything in the thread or blogs regarding theft on the AT, so I feel like it's probably not that big of a deal, but thought I'd ask.

Has anyone ever experienced or saw it happen? As a thru-hiker, you're pretty dependent on your gear so that could be a huge set-back.

mrcoffeect
01-09-2015, 11:23
It is not common, But not unheard of. I always keep a watchful eye on my stuff if interacting with folks i havent gotten to know yet. on trail or in town.

illabelle
01-09-2015, 11:27
We've never experienced or witnessed a theft in 970 AT miles. But we don't hike with the thru-bubble, nor do we hike alone. From what I've read (mostly here on WB), an unattended pack can be vulnerable to pilfering by other backpackers, dayhikers, and of course wildlife. Some people say they carry their stuff with them when they get water from an off-trail source, not even leaving their pack at the shelter. Some people take the packs inside grocery stores and restaurants. Others don't worry about it.
At the very least, I would think you'll want to keep cash and credit cards secure. Find a buddy and look out for each other.

Starchild
01-09-2015, 11:27
IMHO it's a non-issue. But I've heard it happen, one person from Germany had their pack stolen along the AT, bought all new gear, continued, the police napped the person and returned the pack. Another, rummered, was at a trailside shower in IIRC TN. While in the shower they took everything leaving the hiker naked.

But with that said it is very rare the the AT community is very helpful and I would suspect that trail angels may offer replacements to get a thru going again (FWIW I was offered a sleeping bag that got lost, but was able to recover mine, the stipulation was a photo at K and the return of their bag when I was finished.)

So even if something did go astray, you may get overwhelming help as well.

rocketsocks
01-09-2015, 11:38
Saw this bowl of confusion the other day at an outfitters...what da! :confused:

http://www.amazon.com/Pacsafe-120-Anti-Theft-Backpack-Protector/dp/B004RJWFZ8

full conditions
01-09-2015, 11:41
When I did my thru ('76) I know a couple of guys had their packs stolen from the summit of Mt. Greylock. That's the only theft I ever heard of on the Trail. As an aside, I worked at NOC during the 80's and I used to worry about hikers leaving their packs outside of the restaurant but I never heard of one being stolen or stuff being stolen out of one. On the other hand, it's never a bad idea to take common sense precautions.

jdc5294
01-09-2015, 11:44
It had been raining for about 3 straight days coming into Catawba, VA and I had been tent camping, so most of my stuff was wet. I came into the free hostel outside of town (I forget the name, it's set up in a big 4 car garage). Anyway as luck would have it the next day when I woke up it was sunny and 70 out, so I took a zero to recover and dry out. I set up my tent on the lawn outside to dry and took a 15 minute cat nap inside, when I came back outside my tent was gone. I just stayed in the shelters the rest of the way.

Slo-go'en
01-09-2015, 12:52
Bears like to steal unattended packs which have food in them, or just have a heavy scent of food on them. 99.9% of all pack disappearances are due to bears.

Since everyone has similar looking gear, if your in a crowded shelter and leave your stuff laying around and the person next to you is an early riser, they can accidentally pick up something of yours when they pack up in the morning. Sometimes you'll get it back, sometimes not if they are moving faster and farther then you are.

It's also pretty easy to loose stuff by forgetting it in a shelter or hostel. I've lost lots of knifes, spoons and water bags that way.

Basically, keep small valuables out of sight such as wallets, cameras, pharmaceuticals and the like, especially in hostels. Don't tempt someone with an easy snatch. It's not likely someone take the time to dig through a pack looking for something to steal since there is a big risk of someone walking in on them.

Sandy of PA
01-09-2015, 12:59
I write my name somewhere on every thing I carry. If lost they can be returned, if "borrowed" identified. Still have everything after 2000+ miles of hiking.

Just Bill
01-09-2015, 13:35
Town or tourist areas are the bigger threat, never leave your pack unattended. Last two posts were excellent as well.
Theft is based upon opportunity, reduce the opportunity when in public places.

But agree with others 100%, it is pretty rare. Loss or shelter mistakes are the bigger concern. A good packing system solves most of those.

kayak karl
01-09-2015, 14:01
bills right towns are the worst. just use common sense and watch out for posers. they will act like thru's but usually hike between tows and try to con or steal from thrus. most hostel owners figure it out and chase them off.

adamkrz
01-09-2015, 14:11
I take a Alite mantis and just love it, Never been a weight weenie so it's a great pleasure at the end of the day..

adamkrz
01-09-2015, 14:13
I take a Alite mantis and just love it, Never been a weight weenie so it's a great pleasure at the end of the day..

Oops wrong place for this post

mattman578
01-09-2015, 16:33
Ok I am planning a section hike this spring if accidentally take somebodies gear were should I take it to try to give it back to them ?

saltysack
01-09-2015, 16:44
Ok I am planning a section hike this spring if accidentally take somebodies gear were should I take it to try to give it back to them ?

Easiest solution....stay away from the rodent infested shelters and keep ur stuff at your tent


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Skye15
01-09-2015, 16:52
I write my name somewhere on every thing I carry. If lost they can be returned, if "borrowed" identified. Still have everything after 2000+ miles of hiking.

Yup, I plan on writing my name of all my gear. Should I put an address or anything on it? What do people usually do with gear they found or mistook for theirs?

Slo-go'en
01-09-2015, 17:41
Yup, I plan on writing my name of all my gear. Should I put an address or anything on it? What do people usually do with gear they found or mistook for theirs?

If you carry a cell phone, maybe you phone# would be better then an address. It would take less room to write.

Gear I find, if I like it or need it I keep it. If not I leave it. There is no lost and found box on the AT (well, hiker box might qualify). If you notice you have something which isn't yours try to find that person. If you know their behind you, give it to someone going the other way or wait until they catch up.

Just north of Springer I found a nice brand new North Face fleece jacket laying in the middle of the trail. As I walked by I scooped it up and threw it over the back of my pack without missing a beat. About 10 minutes later I came upon two guys ahead of me. Saw one reach behind his pack looking for something and then turn around with alarm written on his face. I reached behind me, grabbed the jacket and waved it in the air and shouted "looking for this?". He was very grateful.

Slo-go'en
01-09-2015, 17:49
When I did my thru ('76) I know a couple of guys had their packs stolen from the summit of Mt. Greylock.

There's a road to the top of Gerylock so that's a place to be careful. Unattended packs can also be mistaken for abandoned gear in a place like that.

Coffee
01-09-2015, 18:16
I much prefer to always keep my pack in my possession or within my sight but that isn't always entirely possible. There are stores and restaurants that simply prohibit packs inside. It is easy to say just don't patronize those establishments right now, but not so easy at times on the trail when a pizza is calling or you have to resupply. I have had luck keeping my pack with me in most places by keeping the volume small, not having all sorts of things hanging off of it, putting my trekking poles in the ice axe straps of my pack rather than carrying them, and trying to clean up at least a little before going inside. If I have to leave my pack outside, I do so briefly and always keep my money, phone, and keys with me at all times.

It is interesting - we should probably trust hikers more than random people but other hikers know the value of our gear. We probably should trust random people in town less, but those people usually have no idea about the value of our gear. I've been mistaken for a homeless person a couple of times, once only a mile or so away from the AT. No one is going to steal a homeless person's smelly backpack.

Thinspace
01-09-2015, 18:23
Not on the AT but I had a heavyweight Patagonia Capaline 1/4 zip stolen from me in one of the shelters in Tuckermans Ravine. Only thing I ever lost in all my years of hiking

Rain Man
01-09-2015, 18:30
I think it's amazing that people don't put their contact info in their cameras and camera cards. It's easy as pie. Take a photo of your contact info. Make sure it gets onto each memory card AND the camera's internal memory. Also, set those photos as "locked," so they can't be erased by mistake.

Studlintsean
01-09-2015, 18:35
This thread reminded me of the time by buddy dropped his tent 1/3 of the way up the priest SOBO. He was not a happy camper that night. Another guy walked right past it SOBO but didn't know if it belonged to a SOBO or NoBO and it was thru hiker season so he played the odds.

Connie
01-09-2015, 19:20
I have no first-hand experience of the AT.

I have had packs full of expensive gear stolen. It hurts: not only for the money involved, which is considerable, just try to find the replacements.

I am still replacing items from the last theft.

I have a black backpack. My gear is either black or grey. If not, at least a dark color to not be obvious inside my shelter.

I figure a black backpack on the floor, or under stuff, is not as noticeable inside my vehicle.

I have no more than 40-45 liters total packed in those smaller backpacks so I can easily keep my backpack right with me.

Sarcasm the elf
01-09-2015, 22:09
Saw this bowl of confusion the other day at an outfitters...what da! :confused:

http://www.amazon.com/Pacsafe-120-Anti-Theft-Backpack-Protector/dp/B004RJWFZ8

Weighs as much as some people's tents.

Connie
01-09-2015, 22:22
Those are for traveler's where backpacks are slashed and the contents taken.

I would think a kevlar bear bag would be more effective: backpack inside.

http://www.ursack.com

MuddyWaters
01-09-2015, 23:42
Not common, but it does happen.
If losing your pack would ruin your hike, best to make sure that doesnt happen.

on the trail, i never leave my pack unless someone i know and trust is going to watch it.

I like solo lodging in town, just because worrying about leaving my stuff in hostels with strangers coming and going when im not there, concerns me enough that i dont feel relaxed.

Damn Yankee
01-09-2015, 23:54
I like to think that for the most part most people are honest but also realize when presented with opportunity, some people may do the dishonest thing. I like to also think that most thru-hiker know how critical this gear is to your survival and to also hopefully finish your thru. In my own opinion I feel it would happen by non-hikers in town, day or week-end hikers on trail. This is not to single these groups out but, they just don't understand the importance of your gear to you. I err on the side of caution always and never give anyone an opportunity or temptation. Same as when I was in the military. Believe it or not, thievery happens there also. Just be vigilant.

Subie Love
01-09-2015, 23:54
The only thing I seen/heard about being stolen on my thru hike happened to me. For the life of me, I can't remember the name of the hostel right now. Its right before the Whites, word of mouth advertisement only, owner is in a wheelchair. Anyway, I had a food drop sent there. I was zeroing and left the box opened under a bench on the porch. I was out and about in the town and when I came back, all my food was gone and the box was ripped up in the garbage. The box was CLEARLY a hikers and not a "hiker box" for freebies. 99% of the people on the trail won't steal from you but watch your stuff just in case.

Hangfire
01-09-2015, 23:56
In my experience you don't have to worry about fellow thru hikers so much as no one wants to carry an extra ounce that they don't have to. Be careful near towns, and make sure your pack looks dirtier and less appealing than those around you. I was always concerned that trekking poles would get mixed up and taken by accident but I only heard of one set stolen from a thru hiker and it was in a nice town (Lincoln NH) that seemed very friendly and safe. Do your best to keep an eye on your stuff, it was a real rarity to hear of theft on the trail last year.

Sly
01-10-2015, 01:59
99.9% of all pack disappearances are due to bears.



How could you possibly arrive at that number? Bears steal 999 out of a 1000 lost packs. Especially at Trail Days!

evyck da fleet
01-10-2015, 02:23
Only time I heard of something being stolen in 2012 was a hiker had his laundry stolen in Damascus while he left the laundromat to do other things.

As far as returning things left behind or accidentally taken, hostels can be helpful. I found a camera on the trail first thing in the morning in the rain in VT, picked it up, called the closest hostel and left my name and number since I didn't know whether it belonged to a SOBO or NOBO. I actually ran into its owner on the trail that day. I also had a pair of shorts gets lost in a hostel's wash but another hiker who knew me and was skipping ahead left me a message and I just told him to drop it at a hostel and let me know which one so I'd stop there. It turned out the guy who returned my shorts was the guy whose camera I had found.

HooKooDooKu
01-10-2015, 02:25
Be careful near towns, and make sure your pack looks dirtier and less appealing than those around you.
Reminds me of an old trick I've heard for guests at Disney World with strollers. Pretty much all rides have stroller parking areas, and as people come and go, the strollers get rearranged by guests and employees alike. So it's not uncommon for someone to accidentally walk off with a similar looking but wrong stroller. One experienced guest said they always tied one of those bags for holding a dirty diaper to the handle of the stroller (which actually just contained a damp hand towel) and they never had their stroller "stollen".

illabelle
01-10-2015, 06:09
I think it's amazing that people don't put their contact info in their cameras and camera cards. It's easy as pie. Take a photo of your contact info. Make sure it gets onto each memory card AND the camera's internal memory. Also, set those photos as "locked," so they can't be erased by mistake.

Never thought of that, but it's a great idea. :)

Booshay
01-10-2015, 06:49
I never leave my pack if possible, unfortunately there are thieves everywhere you go, the trail is no different, probably worse. I met a guy one time who even told me "I found a tent full of great stuff" lol

yerbyray
01-10-2015, 08:24
A good take away from this discussion is when you label your gear, you ought to add a note if you are NOBO or SOBO to increase the odds that it might find you. Something like "John Smith '15 SOBO"

A friend of mine from Trail Talkers forum (RIP) had his pack and contents stolen at 2009 Trail Days. Whoever it was, opened his tent and grabbed it and walked away.

peakbagger
01-10-2015, 12:18
It think is pretty simple, hikers usually don't steal from hikers, but locals may. The farther you are from a road the less concerned you should be. Of course a lot of "theft" is sometimes a messy hiker misplacing stuff. Some folks spread the contents of their pack all over a shelter or a campsite and sometimes it doesn't get back in the pack.

I also have run into folks who got drunk in a trail town and gave away stuff then complained it was stolen the next day.

Nooga
01-10-2015, 12:24
In 2012, 2 hikers had their food bags stolen at a shelter in PA. The food bags were hung on the bear lines. The shelter was near a road and it was thought that some locals had stolen the food. One of the hikers not only had his food in the bag, but also his pot and stove.

Lyle
01-10-2015, 13:07
I've known a couple of folks who had gear stolen while hitch hiking. Lesson learned: If traveling in two's (as you should while hitching), one of you gets into the vehicle prior to loading the packs into a trunk or back of a pick-up. Both times I know that gear was stolen was when the pack was placed into the vehicle while the driver was still inside, then drove off before the hiker was able to get in. Watch for locked doors too.

While on the trail proper, I've never experienced a problem, but I always sleep with my ID, money, credit cards on my person. I also take these things with me when I go to get water and leave my pack at camp. Gear can be replace fairly easily - ID, money, credit cards are what allow this, and are not so easily replaced.

Generally, hikers are very respectful of other hiker's pack and gear. Most are even reluctant to move another's pack out of the way or into shelter when it rains unless they know the owner well. Good attitude in most instances. I never even go into a close friends pack to retrieve an item unless specifically requested to do so. Saves a lot of grief, and questions.

Bronk
01-10-2015, 13:24
Worry in town or near roads. On the trail people mostly don't want to carry the weight they have much less add more of yours.

Old Hiker
01-10-2015, 13:26
Only had one theft - 2 Coleman meals out of my pack while I was waiting on a drop at Standing Bear. Didn't find out until up the Trail.

A couple of posts made comments like: The thieves don't realize how important your gear is to you. Uh, sorry - they don't CARE how important it is. They STOLE it. That shows me that they don't care about you or your possessions at all. I have NO, repeat, NO sympathy or empathy for a thief.

Connie
01-10-2015, 14:52
Rain Man, How do I lock a photo with "if found" information in my digital camera, so it cannot be deleted?

How is that done?

Odd Man Out
01-10-2015, 22:28
It had been raining for about 3 straight days coming into Catawba, VA and I had been tent camping, so most of my stuff was wet. I came into the free hostel outside of town (I forget the name, it's set up in a big 4 car garage). Anyway as luck would have it the next day when I woke up it was sunny and 70 out, so I took a zero to recover and dry out. I set up my tent on the lawn outside to dry and took a 15 minute cat nap inside, when I came back outside my tent was gone. I just stayed in the shelters the rest of the way.

That's the Four Pines Hostel. High on the funkiness scale. But still surprised to lose something that way. Bummer.

Traveler
01-11-2015, 09:14
My view, for what its worth, is there is a certain percentage of the population that will steal if the opportunity presents itself. That same percentage of people exists everywhere, including on the AT, but because people are usually near their gear the incidence of theft is lower.

Remove the opportunity you'll reduce theft. Just the same as you would do anywhere else.

Abatis1948
01-11-2015, 10:25
Last July I started a section hike from Neel Gap and just up the trail I past a new pack just sitting in the middle of the trail. My group thought nothing of it since we do the same when nature calls. Several days later a day hiker reported the pack to the folks at Mountain Crossing who called the law. Turns out the pack and all the other equipment in it was new. A hiker had a mental break just after leaving Mountain Crossing and left his pack with a Go Pro camera and some $3,000.00 cash. From the information in his pack the sheriff department was able to tract his family and eventually find him somewhere up the trail in North Carolina. The AT is much safer than most towns.

bangorme
01-11-2015, 13:46
My view, for what its worth, is there is a certain percentage of the population that will steal if the opportunity presents itself. That same percentage of people exists everywhere, including on the AT, but because people are usually near their gear the incidence of theft is lower.

Remove the opportunity you'll reduce theft. Just the same as you would do anywhere else.

I agree with this, and also the poster that highlighted the logistics involved. Not many would want to carry someone else's pack miles and risk getting caught red handed. I've never had something stolen, but then again don't camp with others.

ATAdam
01-11-2015, 14:26
Theft Happens on the AT, just like everywhere else in society - nothing is 100% safe. Just be cautious of your equipment, dont leave your gear strewn about. Always make it a habit to clean as you go, repack things constantly. After making food, looking for your camera, etc. Get used to being in and around your equipment. It'll help keep an honest person honest, just alittle longer ;)

I stealthd the trail in 2009, didn't run into too may people. And at 6'3, 200lbs I'm not generally a target. But I heard plenty of instances - missing camera, stoves and coats a few pair of chaco's that grew legs.

The AT is a vacation, if you go to europe you dont just leave your stuff lying around, dont do it on the AT. You wont have a problem.

Sarcasm the elf
01-11-2015, 15:06
I think it's worth noting that while theft certainly does happen on the trail. You are far more likely to lose something by accident or leave something behind by mistake.

I've never had anything stolen on the trail, but I have lost gear that fell out of my pack when I was taking something else out and I have left something at a campsite before. Now whenever I open my pack, to remove something while hiking, I zip it back up immediately. Then I check the ground around me before I start to walk again to make sure nothing managed to escape. I am similarly careful when I break camp in the morning.

Slo-go'en
01-11-2015, 15:28
I think it's worth noting that while theft certainly does happen on the trail. You are far more likely to lose something by accident or leave something behind by mistake.

I agree. The chances of loosing stuff is much greater then having it stolen. Or just misplacing it. Some are quick to assume something was stolen, only to find it rolled up in their sleeping bag or at the bottom of their pack later. Sometimes days later.

Of course, you shouldn't be careless about what you leave laying around unattended.

Teacher & Snacktime
01-11-2015, 15:34
Is theft on the AT a concern?

Yes, it will steal your heart. :)

PennyPincher
01-11-2015, 19:01
Saw this bowl of confusion the other day at an outfitters...what da! :confused:

http://www.amazon.com/Pacsafe-120-Anti-Theft-Backpack-Protector/dp/B004RJWFZ8

Not for backpacking but thought this review was interesting:

5.0 out of 5 stars PacSafe - Keeping Us Prepared For The Zombie Apocalypse, July 29, 2013
By
Joe Cox (http://www.amazon.com/gp/pdp/profile/A161FSYBVAHP3Z/ref=cm_cr_pr_pdp) - See all my reviews (http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A161FSYBVAHP3Z/ref=cm_cr_pr_auth_rev?ie=UTF8&sort_by=MostRecentReview)



Verified Purchase(What's this? (http://www.amazon.com/gp/community-help/amazon-verified-purchase))
I have a huge MOLLE pack in my truck loaded with survival gear (my GO bag for natural disasters etc.). I wanted it locked away to protect it from heathen scum that break into trucks and the occasional zombie looking for brains to eat. This Pacsafe Backpack works like a charm! It wrapped the bag, locked it in place in an accessible hard point underneath the rear seat and ... badda-bing - protected.

We have vehicle break-ins in my area once a week. Having ~$400 worth of gear that I've acquired over the years safe really puts my mind at ease.

This is my third PacSafe product and I have been pleased with all three. :)

Dogwood
01-11-2015, 19:32
One should be concerned about theft on the AT similar to one being concerned about not getting hit by a car when crossing the street, not choking on a chicken bone when eating chicken, not tripping on your face on the trail as a result of wet slippery rocks and tree roots, etc.

Funny Slo-go-en, I've let myself get so irritated assuming someone stole something from me only to find it later rolled up inside my pack, inside my sleeping bag, etc. at a later date. Souds like you have been there before as well.

Traveler
01-12-2015, 07:43
Great, now I have to be concerned with zombies among other fabled beasties of the forest....

RED-DOG
01-12-2015, 10:11
I have hiked the AT three times, the things I have learned to do is to keep my gear with me/ within eye sight at all times, I don't put valuables inside my pack I keep my wallet/cash,debit card on me( Don't advertise that your carrying a item of value like a Kindle or Ipods etc ).

When i go in to a grocery store i put my pack on the bottom part of the shopping buggy and i have never had an issue with tacking my pack inside a store.

Never leave your pack stashed at a road crossing or at a shelter.

Listen to your gut instinct, if you get a weird feeling about some one Hike On.

WATCH your Food Bag that seems to be the item everybody wants.

Don't let some one else watch your stuff while you walk to a store or someplace, don't trust every body you meet out their.

And remember don't get drunk and give your gear away just to wake up the next mornning and claim some one stole it ( this happens alot more than people thinks ).

If you remember to use a few simple rules and a little bit of common sense, you should be fine.

Seatbelt
01-12-2015, 11:02
I have a buddy who thru-hiked the AT and had his pack and entire contents stolen in MD a few miles north of Harpers Ferry. A local Ranger said it was a common occurence in the area, Just an FYI.

Speakeasy TN
01-12-2015, 11:47
Just to balance the OP's concerns, I've had people pick up and return bandanas and smart water bottles. Use the shelter registers. You will find gear or it will find you!

Connie
01-12-2015, 11:58
I hike a lot. My hikes are my vacation. My hikes are my favorite form of recreation.

I know many people think we are rich, spoiled kids even if "dressing down" and "acting like" "working class".

The fact is, most "vacationers" are on their big deal trip of a lifetime: they saved their money, this is it.

The theives have got it all wrong. They are ripping off underserving victims of their crime.

I wrote all this, because we are perceived as someone to "rip off".

I think, now, all the good advice in this thread is in proper context.

squeezebox
01-12-2015, 12:02
A few ideas. to counter the snatch and run folks, 1) clip your sternum strap around a post or such. that gives them 5 sec. of messing with your pack to be found out. 2) sew a loop on each side of your sternum strap and lock with a luggage lock. makes even more time. 3) same loops thing on the lid of your pack, real hard to get in your pack that way. lock up the straps of your hiking poles.
Mark all your stuff, get some of those kid's summer camp name tags for your clothes, sleeping bag, tent, etc, anything cloth, no discussion about who's sock that is.
Mark all your metal or plastic stuff, stove, bladder, etc, with colored electrician's tape. "There's a piece of yellow and blue tape on that stove it's mine"
and your real name ,trail name and hiking direction if possible.
Bring another trash compactor bag mark it, when you take your stuff out of your pack put it in your trash compactor bag,no questions about who's gear it is or where it is.
Take pictures of your stuff to show the cops if necc.
Use a small stuff sack as a "purse" // wallet , phone, camera, valuables, ID. Never leave it, take it to the privy, water source, shower, everywhere, never ever leave it.
Every once in a while there is a jerk out there,


Just because you're not paranoid doesn't mean they are not out to get you.

Paw_Paw_Drew
01-14-2015, 12:35
Dang you Connie for posting that link for ursack. I found the LuminAID Solar Inflatable Light, Semi-Transparent on there and had to order one to try as a soft light and pillow. At 2.4 oz I have to test it for section hike later this spring.

Skye15
01-14-2015, 13:03
A few ideas. to counter the snatch and run folks, 1) clip your sternum strap around a post or such. that gives them 5 sec. of messing with your pack to be found out. 2) sew a loop on each side of your sternum strap and lock with a luggage lock. makes even more time. 3) same loops thing on the lid of your pack, real hard to get in your pack that way. lock up the straps of your hiking poles.
Mark all your stuff, get some of those kid's summer camp name tags for your clothes, sleeping bag, tent, etc, anything cloth, no discussion about who's sock that is.
Mark all your metal or plastic stuff, stove, bladder, etc, with colored electrician's tape. "There's a piece of yellow and blue tape on that stove it's mine"
and your real name ,trail name and hiking direction if possible.
Bring another trash compactor bag mark it, when you take your stuff out of your pack put it in your trash compactor bag,no questions about who's gear it is or where it is.
Take pictures of your stuff to show the cops if necc.
Use a small stuff sack as a "purse" // wallet , phone, camera, valuables, ID. Never leave it, take it to the privy, water source, shower, everywhere, never ever leave it.
Every once in a while there is a jerk out there,


Just because you're not paranoid doesn't mean they are not out to get you.

Definitely will use the "purse" idea. The idea of packing a lock makes the gram weenie inside me cringe. :)

Skye15
01-14-2015, 13:04
I have hiked the AT three times, the things I have learned to do is to keep my gear with me/ within eye sight at all times, I don't put valuables inside my pack I keep my wallet/cash,debit card on me( Don't advertise that your carrying a item of value like a Kindle or Ipods etc ).

When i go in to a grocery store i put my pack on the bottom part of the shopping buggy and i have never had an issue with tacking my pack inside a store.

Never leave your pack stashed at a road crossing or at a shelter.

Listen to your gut instinct, if you get a weird feeling about some one Hike On.

WATCH your Food Bag that seems to be the item everybody wants.

Don't let some one else watch your stuff while you walk to a store or someplace, don't trust every body you meet out their.

And remember don't get drunk and give your gear away just to wake up the next mornning and claim some one stole it ( this happens alot more than people thinks ).

If you remember to use a few simple rules and a little bit of common sense, you should be fine.

"get drunk and give your gear away" Man! Those are some nice drunks... Thanks for the tips, didn't think about the shopping buggy one.

rocketsocks
01-14-2015, 14:39
I have hiked the AT three times, the things I have learned to do is to keep my gear with me/ within eye sight at all times, I don't put valuables inside my pack I keep my wallet/cash,debit card on me( Don't advertise that your carrying a item of value like a Kindle or Ipods etc ).

When i go in to a grocery store i put my pack on the bottom part of the shopping buggy and i have never had an issue with tacking my pack inside a store.

Never leave your pack stashed at a road crossing or at a shelter.

Listen to your gut instinct, if you get a weird feeling about some one Hike On.

WATCH your Food Bag that seems to be the item everybody wants.

Don't let some one else watch your stuff while you walk to a store or someplace, don't trust every body you meet out their.

And remember don't get drunk and give your gear away just to wake up the next mornning and claim some one stole it ( this happens alot more than people thinks ).

If you remember to use a few simple rules and a little bit of common sense, you should be fine.
this sounds like a major cry for help to come off trail.

"Please, PLEASE take my gear, I just can't take it anymore" :D

Fireonwindcsr
01-15-2015, 00:54
Taking the shoot on sight approach. If caught stealing they have to know what's coming..... And it won't be nice. Sorry, I just don't have time for that nonsense.

Hot Flash
01-15-2015, 10:40
Those are for traveler's where backpacks are slashed and the contents taken.

I would think a kevlar bear bag would be more effective: backpack inside.

http://www.ursack.com

Yeah, those are for backpacking, European hostel style, rather than backpacking American style. I use one of them when I'm traveling, because it makes it easy to lock things up in a hotel room or an airport/train station while I sleep. Also, if you're in an area where pickpockets do slash and steal, the cable mesh security devices are quite good at deterring that.

RobUgly
01-20-2015, 11:27
WATCH your Food Bag that seems to be the item everybody wants.

Indeed. Had my food bag taken off a bear pole. Im pretty sure it was these two shady "section hikers" heading in the opposite direction.