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squeezebox
01-20-2015, 13:52
I'm thinking of oatmeal in the morning ( The real stuff, not the cardboard instant stuff), with a honey bear or maple syrup, grits some evenings. Help me with some interesting grits recipes. I'm thinking of grits and poached eggs on top, grits and veggies, curried grits, cheezy garlic grits, Grits are pretty neutral flavor on their own, so will accept the flavors you add.
Any other ideas appreciated.

Rocket Jones
01-20-2015, 14:20
The only difference between "real" oatmeal and instant is that the instant is ground finer to cook quicker.

LonghornAT
01-20-2015, 14:30
Try adding bacon bits. Haven't done it personally, but real bacon in grits is tasty.

Rain Man
01-20-2015, 15:15
The only difference between "real" oatmeal and instant is that the instant is ground finer to cook quicker.

Sorry, but not true at all. "Instant" this and "Instant" that has most, if not all, of the good stuff processed out of it. Otherwise, it wouldn't be instant.


I'm thinking of oatmeal in the morning ( The real stuff, not the cardboard instant stuff), with a honey bear ...

Good start, but many "honey bears" are super-processed as instant oatmeal, removing many/most of the good nutrients. In fact, investigations have found that much of it from China contains some sort of processed sugar mix. Just a heads-up to read labels closely.


Help me with some interesting grits recipes.

I like cheesy grits on the trail, but am happy to add lots of margarine and salt/pepper to plain grits. Agree with the comment about bacon bits, but be careful some are real and some are processed artificial stuff. Just know what you are getting. I suppose you could take a small foil package of shrimp.

Enjoy!
Rain:sunMan

.

Odd Man Out
01-20-2015, 15:24
I like to make oatmeal like freezer bag cooking. Add boiling water and let steep, but don't boil. When you boil, you melt the starch granules and this is what makes oatmeal thick and sticky. When you steep (like FBC) the texture is completely different. Also if you do it a bowl, it's much easier to clean up as the cooled starch doesn't set up like glue. I just add Nido, cinnamon and maple syrup.

Connie
01-20-2015, 17:20
How do you make grits not thick and sticky?

Is it the same preparation technique as oatmeal?

I have had delicious grits. I would like to know how to do that.

Since grits are not available in grocery stores, here, I would like to know how to prepare basic grits before finding grits to purchase online.

upstream
01-20-2015, 19:43
I eat grits once or twice a week for dinner, when my family is at work. My favorite is a handful of shredded cheese and a handful of bacon bits. (added after the grits are cooked) But anything is good, leftover fish, porkchop, barbecue, sausage, chicken, roast beef or chinese food. Sometimes just butter, salt and pepper. Sometimes I add leftover veggies too, like cabbage, bok choy, or broccoli.

On the trail, bacon bits or jerky, or sometimes just cheese (white vermont extra sharp), and one time with dehydrated spinach.

I do NOT like instant grits though, and I haven't had any luck with freezer bagging the quick ones, so I have a pot to clean.

rblackburn
01-20-2015, 20:43
I love grits, but haven't tried them on the trail as I usually only do FBC, and don't like instant grits. I wonder how they would dehydrate?

rblackburn
01-20-2015, 21:16
found this:

http://www.backpackingchef.com/grits-recipes.html

Connie
01-20-2015, 22:05
I don't think grits and polenta are the same. I have had grits. I have had polenta: the texture is entirely different. I would say: polenta cakes, same texture as crab cakes I have had.

Grits and seafood?

Anyway:

Grits are white, perhaps from white "dessert" corn.

Polenta is yellow, perhaps from yellow "table" corn.

No?

Rain Man
01-21-2015, 12:30
How do you make grits not thick and sticky?

Mostly it's just a matter of practice. But the good thing is you can add water at almost any time during the process from box/bag to plate. The consistency is a matter of personal preference.

As a kid growing up in South Carolina, I complained one time too many to my older cousin who was our "nanny" at the time, that my grits were too thick. The next morning I got a few grit granules in a glass of hot water with a straw! LOL

This is the same cousin who put me off the school bus and made me walk the rest of the way home one day. She took lots of gruff off me, but did have a limit after all. LOL (In SC at that time, students drove the school buses. I did all through 11th and 12th grades to make spending money.)

Rain Man

zelph
01-22-2015, 12:09
google is my friend :-)

How Corn Grits are made at Falls Mill
The first step in the production of our whole corn grits is the purchase of hybrid white corn from a local farmer. We pull a small grain wagon to his storage bin and auger out about 125 bushels of corn at a time. We weigh the corn and then bring it to the mill for unloading and cleaning. We auger it from the wagon into the mill building, where it is deposited in a floor bin. An elevator, running off our water wheel, picks up the corn a bucket at a time and carries it to the second floor grain cleaner. The cleaner has two shaker screens and a bottom blast fan, which operate to remove stalk, cob, unwanted seeds, cockleburs, and other field trash from the corn. The cleaned corn then drops into a basement auger, which moves it to a second elevator, where it is again carried upstairs and may be conveyed to one of four grain storage bins (usually the grinding bin above the millstones). It takes about five hours for us to unload and clean the 125 bushels.

When ready to mill, we belt up the millstones, fan suction system, and grits separator, and step up the speed of the water wheel, which drives all the machinery through a series of gears, flats belts, line shafts, and pulleys. The millstones we use are a set of 42-inch horizontal granite buhrs manufactured by the R.D. Cole Company of Newnan, Georgia, around the turn of the century. The granite was quarried at the Esopus Quarry in New York state. The millstones rotate about 125 revolutions per minute, and the upper (runner) stone weighs more than 1,500 pounds. Corn is fed into the stones via the hopper and shoe, from the upstairs storage bin. The stones are separated wider than when milling pure corn meal to obtain a coarser product. However, the milled product is a mixture of cracked corn, grits, and corn meal, so must be separated in a sifter (grits separator). As it comes off the stones, it falls into a pipe where the fan suction carries it to the second floor and drops it into the sifter. The corn meal is first sifted through a #20 screen and drops into a bagging bin on the first floor. The coarser product travels over this screen and grits drop through a #12 screen next, into a second bin below. The cracked corn tails off the end of the sifting drum and we regrind it to obtain more grits. The final yield is roughly 55% corn meal, 40% grits, and 5% light bran. The grits, however, will still contain a little bran or chaff. This is usually skimmed off prior to cooking.

No lye products are used in the processing of Falls Mill's grits.

John and Jane Lovett, Owners, Falls Mill & Country Store, 1873We hope you learned a lot about grits from reading this!

zelph
01-22-2015, 12:19
Once you try steel cut oats you wont go back to the other mushy oats.

(quote)
Start your morning with the hearty texture and rich, nutty flavor of steel cut oats. QuakerŽ Quick 3-Minute Oats cooks in just 3 minutes. Try them with a drizzle of maple syrup, a splash of milk, or topped with fruit. It’s the delicious wholesomeness you expect from Quaker.

Connie
01-22-2015, 12:48
I do know that grits I had in The South in the 1950's I found delicious are made from ground dried hominy, referred to as hominy grits.

I also find I like whole hominy in a stew.

Hominy is processed with lye, a good thing, transforming the corn for digestibility.

For example, olives off the tree are transformed by processing with lye.

The only requirement for food safety is a good washing afterward.

All commercial corn is hybridized. However, there exists heritage seed corn of all colors corn kernels.

I know this, because we had white "desert corn" in our garden. There was also yellow "sweet corn" or referred to as "table corn".

I want to purchase authentic hominy grits processed with lye, dried and ground.

I do not know what brand to purchase.

OCDave
01-22-2015, 12:52
Once you try steel cut oats you wont go back to the other mushy oats.

+1, Love my steel cut oats.

WingedMonkey
01-22-2015, 13:08
The only difference between "real" oatmeal and instant is that the instant is ground finer to cook quicker.

You are correct. They are from the smaller grains, plus the are precooked a bit more (steamed, but so are "old fashioned" oats, just not as much).

Nothing is removed from instant that is in old-fashioned.

The problem comes when they add all that crap to the "flavored" instant oatmeal. There are some good quality instant ones out there.

I don't use instant anymore though, because pouring boiling water over the old-fashioned and letting them sit covered cooks them just fine. I bag up a serving with some raisins and some brown sugar and they are good to go.

zelph
01-22-2015, 16:27
googled again:

quote:
Rolled oats are traditionally oat groats (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Groats) that have been de-husked, steamed and then rolled into flat flakes under heavy rollers before being stabilized by being lightly toasted. The oat (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oat), like the other cereals (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cereal), has a hard, inedible outer husk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Husk) that must be removed before the grain can be eaten. After the outer husk (or chaff (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaff)) has been removed from the still bran-covered (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bran) oat grains, the remainder is called oat groats (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Groats). Oat groats are a whole grain (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whole_grain) that can be used as a breakfast cereal (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breakfast_cereal); various forms of oatmeal and rolled oats, and pinhead oats are cooked to make porridge (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porridge) or porage.[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolled_oats#cite_note-perfick-1) Steel-cut oats (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steel-cut_oats) (pinhead oatmeal) are oat groats that have been chopped into smaller pieces before any steaming and thus retain bits of the bran layer. Since the bran layer, though nutritious, makes the grains tough to chew and contains an enzyme (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enzyme) that can cause the oats to go rancid (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rancidification), raw oat groats are often further steam-treated to soften them for a quicker cooking time (modern "quick oats") and to denature the enzymes for a longer shelf life.
Rolled oats that are sold as oatmeal (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oatmeal) usually, but not always, have had the tough bran removed. They have often, but not always, been lightly baked or pressure-cooked or "processed" in some fashion. Thick-rolled oats are large whole flakes, and thin-rolled oats are smaller, fragmented flakes. Oat flakes that are simply rolled whole oats without further processing can be cooked and eaten as "old-fashioned" oatmeal, but more highly fragmented and processed rolled oats absorb water much more easily and therefore cook faster, so they are sometimes called "quick" or "instant" oatmeal. Oatmeal can be further processed into coarse powder, which, when cooked, becomes a thick broth. Finer oatmeal powder is often used as baby food (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_food). Rolled oats are also often the main ingredient in granola (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Granola) and muesli (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muesli).

Connie
01-22-2015, 17:45
Huh? I gave my horse rolled oats.

Zelph, here is an article for you. http://www.thekitchn.com/polenta-versus-grits-whats-the-difference-187807

I would like to know what brand grits are, in fact, hominy grits.

Anyone?

zelph
01-23-2015, 00:53
Huh? I gave my horse rolled oats.

Zelph, here is an article for you. http://www.thekitchn.com/polenta-versus-grits-whats-the-difference-187807

I would like to know what brand grits are, in fact, hominy grits.

Anyone?

Your horse loves you more for it!!

Quaker: Quick Enriched White Hominy Grits, 24 Oz


http://www.walmart.com/ip/10312475?www=true&productRedirect=true

upstream
01-23-2015, 08:42
In the south, all the grits on the store shelves are hominy grits. Untreated grits require refrigeration.

Hikes in Rain
01-23-2015, 08:58
Don't let them fool you; the best hominy grits are the ones I make literally from scratch. Start with dried corn; soak overnight in lime water. (OK, I really soak them for more like a day by the time I get back to them.) That's a process known as nixtamalization. It removes the hulls, frees up the niacin that's bound up in corn, seriously improves the flavor and aroma, and reduces the mycotoxins. (People who eat nixtamalized corn don't get pellagra)

Rinse very well (taste it from time to time. If it's bitter, rinse more), then dry (or not). Grind it in a Corona hand cranked grinder and cook. Longer the better. Add whatever flavorings you like (I'm partial to bacon and cheese in copious amounts).

Note: I don't do this when hiking!:)

rocketsocks
01-23-2015, 09:11
I like boiled corn meal...Porage, of which I'll share with you, my feet are my only carriage, I've got to push on through, but while I'm gone...no women no cry, no women no cry.

I also like this for making tortillas, it has lime in it. Good for tamales, sopas...ect, ect.
https://encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTvmBA2jzuSAtuJ53d0CK4lGY0gFXrSf k4xZXYA9q5ofK1ddRUS:www.mimaseca.com/application/public/i/productos/detalle/maseca-regular-detalle.png

rocketsocks
01-23-2015, 09:14
https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTT5fWgKqZWoWfWCee1m9Jej-lpDxVfyIlCpxnL_6kdx-MEXLoV:www.americansweets.co.uk/ekmps/shops/statesidecandy/images/quaker-yellow-corn-meal-mix-680g-tub-dated-04-11-14-625-p.jpgthis for corn porage, don't forget the butter...Mmm good.

rocketsocks
01-23-2015, 09:24
found this while pokin' around for for hominy

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nixtamalization

July
01-23-2015, 09:45
found this while pokin' around for for hominy

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nixtamalization

As back in ancient civilization, I concur with the justification of nixtamalization!

squeezebox
01-23-2015, 10:55
Cream of Wheat might be another possibility.

Connie
01-23-2015, 11:29
I didn't know what it did to the corn, thank you for that.

I just knew it was better, more digestible, and healthier because nutrients were more easily assimilated.

Wheat is like that: when wheat is made into flour, the flour has to be sifted repeatedly, then "rest". This was to keep from using fresh flour immediately. There is a substance in raw fresh wheat that the air will destroy, and, the wheat flour is better if that is destroyed by the air. Then, proceed.

Connie
01-24-2015, 00:39
QUOTE:

Thanks for reaching out to us here at Quaker. We're happy to give you some background on grits and hominy.


The definition for hominy is essentially that the corn has had the hard outer shell (the hull) and the small oily center part (the germ) removed from it before being ground. Quaker Grits do not have any hulls or germ.


Historically, the hulls have been removed by treating the corn kernels with a mild solution of hot lye. However, we do not treat any of our grits with lye or any other chemicals during processing; we use mechanical methods to remove the hulls instead.


While the process is a little different, the term "hominy" is common throughout many regions of the U.S., so we didn't change the name. However, it may be up to individual interpretation as to whether the traditional lye step is required for something to be truly called "hominy".


I hope this information is helpful for you in deciding if you want to try Quaker Grits. Thanks for checking with us.


Jessica
Quaker Consumer Relations
A Division of PepsiCo
Ref# 060393346A


It is "helpful". It is not hominy grits.

Hominy is the result of using "wood ash" or "lime water" to remove the hulls.

Dried and ground, it is hominy grits.

Connie
01-24-2015, 00:43
If you do not have vitamin B3, relying on corn products like this, you will have pellagra.

Three regions of the world unnecessarily that have corn products have pellagra.

Hikes in Rain
01-24-2015, 10:33
They do, unless the nixtamalization process is common. Decades ago, pellegra was common in the south. Not so in the southwest. Both were corn based, but the south didn't use the process much. Connie, do you have a reference for the wheat? I grind it, too, and often use it right after grinding. I can't really tell a difference between it and older flour I've ground, but I could certainly be missing something.

Connie
01-24-2015, 12:19
I don't have the reference.

He said, pt-tal-in I think.

He was a bicyclist in the PanAm games.

He showed me how to discard the first cream off raw milk, and, the temperature of pasturization. He showed me how to make yoghurt, to make "farmer cheese".

He said caffeine "kills" B-complex. (I had native americans tell me "black water" is for constipation. It is not a "refreshment".)

He added "nutritional yeast" to popcorn instead of salt.

He knew about wheat. He didn't know about corn.

I am not certain, but I think unprocessed corn "robs" B1, B2 and B3.

Hominy corn is processed corn.

There needs to be a more accepted term than "processed food".

People worldwide have been "processing" food to rid harmful effects and improve bioavailability.

For example, tempeh and tamari is processed soy.

There is the benefit for harmful fungus, but the word etymology "nixtamalization" refers to wood ash in the process: the process transforms the "corn" chemically making the nutrition bioavailable.

Fortified corn "grits" products "add" B3 niacin.

Pellagra is a nutritional deficiency, not a disease.

At Hopi, they know how to "do" hominy: I had "irish stew" with white rose potatos and hominy. I think "wood ash" had been used.

The problem with "wood ash" is knowing what vegetative matter and wood is safe to use. There are poisons in plant matter and in some wood, as well.

The problem with "lime water" is too much chemical, the wrong chemical, and/or insufficient clean water supply for the rinse.

I would like to know how to make hominy from "scratch". No pun intended. :-) i would need whole kernal white corn and the right disc for the Corona hand mill.

It is either that, or, true-hominy grits from a grocer, or, maybe from a food service for restaurants?

Hikes in Rain
01-24-2015, 12:41
The old pioneers used wood ash and water to make lye. I've done that; it comes out a little weak. If memory serves, the pH was around 10 or so. I think they used to boil it to concentrate it. Sounds like a risky business to me!

A rough soap can be made by adding hardwood ash to the grease in your pot or skillet while it's still on the fire. The saponification process happens quickly, and makes a brownish liquidy soap that'll clean the pot nicely. The excess alkalinity can do a number on your hands, though. Found that out by repeated experimentation. :)

The process with corn works equally well with lime or lye; it's the strong base solution, with a pH of 12 to 13 that causes the reaction. Boils down to whichever you're more comfortable using or which is available. Modern day "pickling lime" is what I use. It's food grade and easy to come by, and just seems a lot safer to handle than pouring a strong liquid lye into water where it could splash. I'm rather partial to my eyes!

I make yogurt, too, but haven't branched out into cheeses yet. It's on the list, but said list is growing faster than I can check stuff off. I use nutritional yeast (brewers yeast) when I brew my beer and mead, so I end up getting a lot of it in my system. Why not; it's the source of B vitamin pills. I like my way of ingestion better. :D

Thanks for the explanation on the wheat; I think I can use it as a start to researching it. After all, I don't have enough obsessions yet. Really appreciate the help.

Connie
01-24-2015, 12:45
His recipe for natural yoghurt, started with raw milk. He used unprocessed organic "greek yoghurt" for a "starter". The milk was from "Brown Swiss".

Farmer cheese sits in layers of cheesecloth. Nothing more special.

Brewer's yeast is a great source of B-complex if never over-heated.

I don't know the effect of alcohol on B-vitamins.

I thought mead was apple-jack, not beer.

Ah, obsessions is it? Good food, I say.

I really like true-hominy grits. Good food!

Hikes in Rain
01-24-2015, 13:27
Apple jack is hard cider, freeze concentrated. That is, you take a good hard cider (preferably homemade), freeze it, and throw away the ice. Curiously, doing so is illegal in the US, so I can't recommend it. Mead is fermented honey. I like to use 3 pounds per gallon (that's a pretty high initial specific gravity.) Varietal honeys from the local bee keepers are my favorite source of honey. I also use a good Champagne yeast to attenuate it down to around 12% alcohol, about that of wine. It, too, could be freeze concentrated. That concentrates the honey (or apple) flavors as well as the alcohol. Honey jack? I like Isenmead better. More like Isenbier. Oh yeah, there is a freeze concentrated beer. I haven't done any of them, as my normal beer, mead and cider are very good.

I'm not sure what alcohol does to the B's, either. They're water soluble, not fat soluble, but alcohol? Beats me.

I like Jim Butcher's quote: my resume contains a laundry list of skills that were obsolete a couple of centuries ago.

Connie
01-24-2015, 14:06
My hope is that "good food" will never be pushed out by "commercial products".

Is grits and gravy, good?

I know soneone who said he likes grits and gravy. White gravy? Brown gravy?

Hikes in Rain
01-25-2015, 15:13
If it is, it won't be for the lack of my trying! Grits and gravy never "did it" for me, but lots of folks seem to like it. Mostly, I've seen white or sausage gravy, but I don't see why you couldn't use either one. Try it and see if you like it.

I do like shrimp and grits for hiking. I figure if it's good enough for a low country fisherman's breakfast, it should work for me. http://www.backpackingchef.com/shrimp-and-grits.html

Rain Man
01-26-2015, 19:07
I know soneone who said he likes grits and gravy. White gravy? Brown gravy?

Heavens no! Red-eye gravy. ;)

Rain Man

.

gunner76
01-26-2015, 19:55
From an article I found....


How are grits any different than polenta ?
Both polenta and grits are made from stone-ground cornmeal, dried corn that’s ground down into smaller, coarse bits. So how do the two differ? Some people think the difference lies in geography: the Italian version is known as polenta whereas the Southern version is known as grits. Others think that polenta is made with yellow corn while grits are always made with white corn.


Anson Mills founder Glen Roberts is quoted in the piece describing the difference as he sees it: while both grits and polenta are made from stone-ground cornmeal, "Southern grits and Italian polenta are traditionally made from two vastly different types of corn. How many times it's milled and the fineness of the grind also differ. And then there's the taste and texture."


Most grits in the South are traditionally made from a class of corn called dent corn whereas in Italy, most polenta is made from a class of corn called flint corn, which holds its texture better. Why do these different classes matter? Because of the different type of corn, grits can even come across as almost mushy while polenta is often more coarse and toothsome.


I find polenta to be much sticker than grits

Virginia Son
01-27-2015, 00:39
Quaker grits? Only when I run out of Carolina grits. Picked up a bag in lovely Charleston in the fall. Call 877-742-3496 to order. In SNP in September the menu read -- Grits for breakfast: once grits are cooked fold in scrambled dried eggs, salt/pepper, bit of oil. Grits for dinner: add dried veggies, chunks of dried hot sausage, hot pepper flakes. Seed Savers Exchange Winter 2014 issue feature on grinding your own from dent or flint corn. Gonna plant some this summer.

Mags
01-27-2015, 01:47
I kept on reading this thread as "Curried Gifts"...seriously! :)

Now I have hankering for an AYCE Indian buffet. ;)

rocketsocks
01-27-2015, 02:27
From an article I found....
How are grits any different than polenta ?
Both polenta and grits are made from stone-ground cornmeal, dried corn that’s ground down into smaller, coarse bits. So how do the two differ? Some people think the difference lies in geography: the Italian version is known as polenta whereas the Southern version is known as grits. Others think that polenta is made with yellow corn while grits are always made with white corn.


Anson Mills founder Glen Roberts is quoted in the piece describing the difference as he sees it: while both grits and polenta are made from stone-ground cornmeal, "Southern grits and Italian polenta are traditionally made from two vastly different types of corn. How many times it's milled and the fineness of the grind also differ. And then there's the taste and texture."


Most grits in the South are traditionally made from a class of corn called dent corn whereas in Italy, most polenta is made from a class of corn called flint corn, which holds its texture better. Why do these different classes matter? Because of the different type of corn, grits can even come across as almost mushy while polenta is often more coarse and toothsome.


I find polenta to be much sticker than grits
while I don't like grit in my teeth, I do love a toothy grit....go figure.

FlyFishNut
01-27-2015, 20:52
Man - I'm really glad I found this thread! I love grits: cheese grits with over easy eggs atop, garlic grits, shrimp and grits, grits with (insert whatever is in the fridge) mixed in, ... with veggies. Mmmmmm

In a related topic: I am thinking of getting a dehydrator (much of the dehydrated stuff will go in grits). I don't want to spend a mint and I don't want to cheap out.

Any suggestions on a good dehydrator that I won't grow out of, but that isn't an expensive behemoth?

July
01-27-2015, 21:26
Man - I'm really glad I found this thread! I love grits: cheese grits with over easy eggs atop, garlic grits, shrimp and grits, grits with (insert whatever is in the fridge) mixed in, ... with veggies. Mmmmmm

In a related topic: I am thinking of getting a dehydrator (much of the dehydrated stuff will go in grits). I don't want to spend a mint and I don't want to cheap out.

Any suggestions on a good dehydrator that I won't grow out of, but that isn't an expensive behemoth?

I'm with ya on the cheese grits and eggs, I may have to go back to the kitchen tonight! Check out the 'excalibur' line of dehydrators, they seem to get good reviews. I switched from an old mr coffee round to one of these and it works great. Also not too expensive.

shelb
01-27-2015, 22:49
You might try adding some steel cut oats (Red Mill is one source that makes them - sold at Walmart and Meijer Stores).

These really add a "chewie" quality! (Like the Chobani Oats Yogurt).

Connie
01-27-2015, 23:02
http://mobile.nesco.com/products/Dehydrators/Dehydrators/FD-77DT-Digital-Top-Mounted-Dehydrator/session_9ac58d564b22/

Is this dehydrator good enough? $99

It provides for 12 trays. It has the top-mounted fan, it has 95-160 F temperature range, the timer turns it OFF.

It doesn't take up all the countertop in a small kitchen.

I want the recipe to make hominy. I want to know the right Corona grinder. I will make my own grits, and, other homemade dehydrated dinners I have seen at the forum and links.


Rain man, Thank you for Red-eye gravy.

Hikes in Rain
01-28-2015, 07:56
Hi, Connie,

This is for making tortillas, but the first step to do that (before grinding) is making hominy. It also has descriptions and links for the Corona mill and its clones. For grits, just let the hominy dry and set the grinder wide open. http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/18963/corona-mill-and-tortillas Be sure to hunt up the Alton Brown video on U-tube. Hilarious, and very informative.

I originally got the Corona (for $6.00 plus shipping!) at a home brew shop website. Useful for cracking grain for brewing. I wanted to grind flour, but it's not really suited for that purpose, and it didn't work well. It's also like real work! Remember the Biblical reference of "earning thy bread by the sweat of thy brow." Hand grinding flour in a hot garage in Florida in July pops up plenty of sweat on the manly brow! Grinding corn is much easier than wheat; grinding hominy into masa is a piece of cake. Not too eventually, we also got a WhisperMill (now rebranded as WonderMill), which was marketed as the quietest electric mill on the market. Like the old WhisperLite stove (neither quiet nor light), it's seriously misnamed. Thing sounds like a jet engine winding up and down, but it makes mounds of really fine flour in seconds. I can even make whole wheat cake flour with it!

Shop around for the grinder. Check eBay, too, for a lightly used one. They're cast iron; they don't wear out.

Nesco, I think, is a nice dehydrator. I'm currently still using a cheap Walmart special, with no fan or thermostat. It works, after a fashion, but it's due for replacement soon. It's really just a step up from using the oven, and a short step, at that.

RED-DOG
01-28-2015, 10:31
Try Hot Cereal with honey and some dehydrated fruit instead of oatmeal it's very awesome.

FlyFishNut
01-29-2015, 19:05
http://mobile.nesco.com/products/Dehydrators/Dehydrators/FD-77DT-Digital-Top-Mounted-Dehydrator/session_9ac58d564b22/

Is this dehydrator good enough? $99

.

Looks perfect-Thanks!

squeezebox
01-29-2015, 21:04
Red dog; by hot cereal do you mean cracked wheat, cream of wheat, or something else?

Connie
02-16-2015, 16:14
I am finding grits recipes, now, online.

http://www.cooking.com/recipes-and-more/soul-soothing-grits-article?CCAID=cknwfhne06075bd&s=s0099741314s&mid=2091025&rid=99741314#axzz3RwNDKIQ3

I find there are quite a few recipes websites, online.

Walkintom
02-16-2015, 17:12
Jim Dandy grits are pretty good. Better than the dog food they make, anyway.

sarbar
02-17-2015, 00:59
For those of you who can't find grits in a store - are you looking in the hot cereal section? That is where it is always sold in the Western states.

I love instant grits - I get the plain and add in all sorts of savory (2 packets makes a meal). Meat, veggies, cheese, etc. Also good prepped, then cooled and then fried......

woodguy
02-17-2015, 10:46
I hate Curry, but I like grits well enough, I would at least try.it..