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hooshr
01-26-2015, 09:34
I am new to this forum and am planning a 2017 thru hike with plans to attend Warren Doyle Appalachian Trail School in April 2015. I plan to use a tent and need assistance with sleeping system (bag) for thru hike with expected late March - Early April departure NOBO. I am 5' 11" and 210 lbs. Seeking suggestions/information. Thank you in advance for your input.

swjohnsey
01-26-2015, 09:52
It ain't rocket science but sleeping system threads here tend to be like oil threads on the car and motorcycle forums. You need a sleeping bag or quilt and pad. Whether you choose one that weighs 1 1/2 lbs or 5 lbs is the question. I went with the 1 1/2 lb option, Western Mounteering High Light bag rated 35 degrees and Thermarest Neoair Xlite pad. You are likely to encounter lower temperatures for a couple of nights. You can deal with it by wearing your insulating layer to sleep in. You might even suffer a little on those cold nights. You won't die.

Frye
01-26-2015, 09:55
You need to be more specific then that sir. What works for John Doe very well might not work for you. My best advice would be contacting someone like Tim at Enlightened Equipment (or any trustworthy manufacturer), describe your trip, how you sleep, and any particular info they might ask and go from there. It took me multiple bags and a ton of money to finally find what works best for me, best to try and avoid as much of that as possible and get it right from the start.

I will add that if you plan on splurging on at least one item, let your bag be it. Tents and packs will come and go, but a good down bag can last a very long time.


with plans to attend Warren Doyle Appalachian Trail School

I'm sure a lot of people will disagree with me, but I think you'd be better off just getting out there and learning without all the instruction. In my opinion you'll just find yourself hiking to someone else's standards. Hook up with one or two people who've done some backpacking and hit the trail for a few weekends. Just remember to pick up after yourself! Don't complicate a simple thing and enjoy yourself.

hooshr
01-26-2015, 13:54
swjohnsey,

Thank you for input. I think the lighter weight option is preferable. I have seen Western Mounteering mentioned frequently. I will check out. Thanks again for input

hooshr
01-26-2015, 13:58
Frye,

Thank you for input. I am trying to be a "sponge" i.e., soak all the available information. Can you give me contact information for Enlightened Equipment. I agree on keeping it simple, but I also want to learn as much as I can from others, but ultimately it is up to me, i.e., hike my own hike. Looking forward to the experience.

Havana
01-26-2015, 14:29
Frye,
Can you give me contact information for Enlightened Equipment.

It's the first entry under a Google search for Enlightened Equipment. ;)

Venchka
01-26-2015, 14:42
Be patient. The gear today won't be around in 2017. The gear in 2017 isn't on the market yet.
On the other hand, watch for sales. Closeouts. Discontinueds. Factory seconds. Low mileage used at this forum.
The smartest thing you can do: Buy quality once. Post #2 lists 2 trusted brands. Add Feathered Friends for bags. I passed my 1975 vintage REI 3 season down bag to my granddaughter last summer. I'm in the market for a replacement. I own a Western Mountaineering 5 bag with perfect internal dimensions my my shape. Unfortunately, WM only offers that bag in 5 and 10 versions. Feathered Friends offers a similar sized internal shell in 10, 20 and 30 versions. I have my eye on their Osprey 30 bag. I wish WM did the same.
Get outside! Have fun!

Wayne

Venchka
01-26-2015, 14:47
ps: I treated myself to a NeoAir Xtherm large and Exped Air Pillow (the red one with 2 valves) last spring. Best night's (actually used for 1 week to 10 days in a row) sleep ever!

Wayne

Tuckahoe
01-26-2015, 15:44
http://www.enlightenedequipment.com



I'm sure a lot of people will disagree with me, but I think you'd be better off just getting out there and learning without all the instruction. In my opinion you'll just find yourself hiking to someone else's standards. Hook up with one or two people who've done some backpacking and hit the trail for a few weekends. Just remember to pick up after yourself! Don't complicate a simple thing and enjoy yourself.

How is hooking up "with one or two people who've done some backpacking" different than taking a class from Warren Doyle? Either method will result in influences from the mentor.

WILLIAM HAYES
01-26-2015, 17:17
I met warren several years ago in the hundred mile wilderness if you are going to his school you will learn a heck of a lot about hiking the trail he has thru hiked it many times and can give you great advice about a sleeping system I personally use a hammock with a top quilt and a bottom quilt and a light weight pad if it gets cold I have never been cold with the system I use

Dogwood
01-26-2015, 17:44
With a 2017 AT thru-hike planned and everything I'm gleaning about you take Doyle's AT Class. You will better understand a AT thru-hike and make you better prepared for your hike in 2017.

Frye
01-26-2015, 18:58
http://www.enlightenedequipment.com



How is hooking up "with one or two people who've done some backpacking" different than taking a class from Warren Doyle? Either method will result in influences from the mentor.

Hooking up with a few people who backpack will cost less and you'll get more time on the trail.

I'm not following the line about being influenced. Just about everything we do is influenced by someone or something else, that doesn't mean we need to sit down and take a class. It's backpacking, and backpacking on the Appalachian Trail at that, hardly rocket science.

I also don't care if someone wants to take the class, I hope it's a lark, I just don't see the point

Like I said though, I'm sure a lot of people will disagree with me. It really was just a passing thought...