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AliciaG
02-19-2015, 16:11
Safety is so important in the backcountry and it's always a big dilemma for me deciding what to carry and, what to leave behind.

Take a look at this backcountry safety gear list (http://bc25.com/safety-items-always-in-backpack-backcountry/) blog post and let me know how you feel about this list.

Have I missed anything? Too much? Too little?

thanks!

Nodust
02-19-2015, 16:16
A way to keep warm, dry, hydrated, and get found.

PilotB
02-19-2015, 16:22
A container to collect / carry / drink from. Possibly something to purify also.

Tipi Walter
02-19-2015, 16:25
Your thread makes it sound like you're talking to Backpackers but really you're more focused on Dayhikers, a completely different animal. Backpackers carry alot of stuff and most of it could be considered survival items---tent/tarp, bag, pad, food, water, stove, headlamp etc etc etc.

Dayhikers go from nothing but flip flops, shorts and a t-shirt to guys with a full daypack containing the items you mention.

Tom Murphy
02-19-2015, 16:30
Safety is so important in the backcountry and it's always a big dilemma for me deciding what to carry and, what to leave behind.

Take a look at this backcountry safety gear list (http://bc25.com/safety-items-always-in-backpack-backcountry/) blog post and let me know how you feel about this list.

Have I missed anything? Too much? Too little?

thanks!

1. radio - provides a false sense of security; replace with leave your trip itinerary with someone.

5. Down jacket - replace with sufficient insulation layers to survive the expected overnight lows; in case you are benighted

7. Map or GPS - replace with map and compass and the skill/experience to use them properly

10. Fire Starter - add the skill/experience to create and sustain afire in the expected conditions

ADD hard shell (rain protection) required to keep insulating layers dry while moving.

Items I consider required - extra set of wool socks, wool hat, wool liner gloves

Donde
02-19-2015, 16:49
Why do people still suggest old school fire starters? A bic lighter is cheap effective and reliable, just pop it in a ziplock or someother waterproof storage (say the plastic case that came with your PocketRocket perhaps, and your good to go. Tom accurately points out having the ability to start and maintain a fire in challenging conditions is esential for any of this to be useful.

Connie
02-19-2015, 16:59
I like the premise.

However, the photos are of big and bigger items. Are you kidding? Are you nuts?

If I had the skill set to make a slick Blog format website, I would have illustrations of gear I recommend at my website, specifically, a lumbar pack or sling pack or a fashion day pack with useful lightweight and low volume gear for an overnight bivy w/shelter or w/out shelter, ready-to-eat food, and add the simple out-and-back "keychain" GPS units.

For example, the lightweight sleeping quilts available, now, are beautiful enough to use at home as well.

The CCF foam can circle around the contents of an otherwise shapeless lightweight daypack. The bivy is low-volume. The excellent value lightweight and low volume "extra clothing" packs well.

I do hope the dayhikers or overnighters or weekend hikers that use their SPOT you obviously think substitutes for every problem get a big fine! Maybe jail!

I advocated so hard to get PLB's for "the lower 48" and not only Alaska, or pilots, so I feel "emotionally invested" in the matter of abuse.

I know people won't purchase maps at national parks; it is really something if they look at the big relief map model.

More affordable "keychain" backtrack GPS units, please.

If they can responsibly "make fire" with a backpacker stove, good. Otherwise, handwarmer packets strategically placed in pockets.

If fire, a reflective surface "rescue" sheet to reflect the heat of the fire back to you.

Yes, "beginners" don't know how to do stuff.

But, they need to start "somewhere".

Dayhikers, tourists and travelers, will not purchase a big honking backpack and a big honking first aid kit to "dayhike" away from the parking lot at the national park or a day hike, or out-and-back hike from another public signage trailhead.

at_travis
02-19-2015, 22:53
Sounds like a good list to get people to buy things...

Equipment can not replace knowledge.

rickb
02-20-2015, 05:49
A quick review of this poster's history will speak for itself.

Starchild
02-20-2015, 08:56
A compass would be nice. So would water purification.

Starchild
02-20-2015, 17:04
Equipment can not replace knowledge.

At one time this was true. It no longer is the case with our technology.

Connie
02-20-2015, 17:17
I helped to an extent in a major rescue, involving the first arrest in a national park.

I assure you, those young people had the best of the best equipment.

Knowledge is everything, except perhaps wisdom.

RockDoc
02-20-2015, 17:29
The radio should be programmed with NOAA weather stations. Monitor them regularly and you will know when storms are about to hit. If you plan to use VHF/UHF radios, you need to pass the Technician test and be licensed by the FCC. This is a good idea even for urban life (in case of disaster) and not very hard. If you do this you can use repeaters along the mountains to communicate. Otherwise with just a cell phone you are SOL because of poor signal and battery limitations.

Don't rely on a GPS or a silly watch. Gadgets. Geez. If you care about your life carry a real map and study it every day.

A down jacket but no mention of decent rain gear? We used to joke about 100 lb down sleeping bags once they got wet.

Connie
02-20-2015, 17:38
For awhile, REI had a nice topo maps for that region and a few highlights of big mountains, then added a topo map computer. Now, you don't see that promoted.

I like it when I see an outdoors store have maps, national park maps, road maps, topo maps, river access maps.

Having maps in the store heightens awareness of maps.

Those cute little keychain GPS units with few waypoints back to the parking lot are so nice for the dayhiker.

I wish there were many more, like keychain temperature guage-compass available in practically every outdoor store.

I also wish the price would come down so there would be no excuse to try it out, first down to $19.95 then diwn to $5.99

I think even tourists would purchase those. The gift shop clerk could go over the instructions with their customer.

So much better than nothing.

Here's one: $90
http://news.discovery.com/tech/gear-and-gadgets/get-back-to-where-you-started-with-this-keychain-gps.htm

Here's one: $79.95
http://m.hammacher.com/Product/Default.aspx?sku=78558&refsku=75968

Here's Amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/Personal-Pocket-GPS-Locator-tracker/dp/B00MYZ2QOW

Demeter
02-28-2015, 09:05
That is good, but I think mine is better. And I have a full "shameless plug" disclosure. Even if it's at the very bottom :) Just saying, I don't think anyone with experience should be telling those without experience to carry a gps or a map. IMHO, everyone should still have a map.

http://demeters-dish.blogspot.com/2014/03/the-ten-backpacking-essentials.html

Uriah
03-02-2015, 12:10
I helped to an extent in a major rescue, involving the first arrest in a national park. I assure you, those young people had the best of the best equipment. Knowledge is everything, except perhaps wisdom.

Well said Connie. I used to help volunteer with SAR here in Colorado and we were frequently retrieving a wide array of fools with the nicest, most expensive of equipment, equipment most of us on the squad could never afford.

Knowledge is knowing that an avocado is a fruit; wisdom is knowing not to put it in a fruit salad.

Of course, the best sort of knowledge (and perhaps wisdom) comes only with experience and that takes a willingness to learn and therefore make some mistakes en route. What we see up here are those who skip the steps and go straight to the big, life-threatening errors. Heck, a month or so ago we had a guy trying to cross Trail Ridge Road (12,000+ feet) on foot with little more than summer street clothes and a plastic bag of groceries (here (http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_27419478/new-york-man-missing-at-rmnp-fled-rangers)). Luckily, most of us aren't that dumb (or suicidal).

The ten "essentials" I value are:
1) Wisdom (though I'm not quite there myself)
2) Knowledge of thyself (strengths, weaknesses, limits)
3) Knowledge of the goal and all that it takes
4) Knowledge of Ma Nature (terrain, weather, potential weather, etc)
5) Fitness (structural, aerobic, metabolic)
6) Ego (confidence in your ABILITIES, not your capacities**)
7) Lack of ego (i.e., a willingness to "fail" by retreating when needed, etc)
8) Water access and food supplies (regardless of metabolic fitness)
9) Knowledge of equipment (and Nature's equipment)
10) Equipment (clothing, fire starter, shelter, map, compass, H2O filter, etc)

**Ability is measurable; capacity is a condition

I personally don't look at thru-hiking or hiking as risky propositions, though there's obviously some risk involved (just as there is in life, which always ends up the same regardless). What we see up here is an inverse relationship: that the risk decreases as the wisdom and knowledge and fitness increase. Historically we've seen that equipment is not a panacea like its manufacturers want you to believe.

Joey
03-31-2015, 03:18
Well said Connie. I used to help volunteer with SAR here in Colorado and we were frequently retrieving a wide array of fools with the nicest, most expensive of equipment, equipment most of us on the squad could never afford.

Knowledge is knowing that an avocado is a fruit; wisdom is knowing not to put it in a fruit salad.

Of course, the best sort of knowledge (and perhaps wisdom) comes only with experience and that takes a willingness to learn and therefore make some mistakes en route. What we see up here are those who skip the steps and go straight to the big, life-threatening errors. Heck, a month or so ago we had a guy trying to cross Trail Ridge Road (12,000+ feet) on foot with little more than summer street clothes and a plastic bag of groceries (here (http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_27419478/new-york-man-missing-at-rmnp-fled-rangers)). Luckily, most of us aren't that dumb (or suicidal).

The ten "essentials" I value are:
1) Wisdom (though I'm not quite there myself)
2) Knowledge of thyself (strengths, weaknesses, limits)
3) Knowledge of the goal and all that it takes
4) Knowledge of Ma Nature (terrain, weather, potential weather, etc)
5) Fitness (structural, aerobic, metabolic)
6) Ego (confidence in your ABILITIES, not your capacities**)
7) Lack of ego (i.e., a willingness to "fail" by retreating when needed, etc)
8) Water access and food supplies (regardless of metabolic fitness)
9) Knowledge of equipment (and Nature's equipment)
10) Equipment (clothing, fire starter, shelter, map, compass, H2O filter, etc)

**Ability is measurable; capacity is a condition

I personally don't look at thru-hiking or hiking as risky propositions, though there's obviously some risk involved (just as there is in life, which always ends up the same regardless). What we see up here is an inverse relationship: that the risk decreases as the wisdom and knowledge and fitness increase. Historically we've seen that equipment is not a panacea like its manufacturers want you to believe.

Now that is the best 10 essentials I have seen! Perfect!!!

Minos
11-16-2017, 22:42
Safety is so important in the backcountry and it's always a big dilemma for me deciding what to carry and, what to leave behind.

Take a look at this backcountry safety gear list (http://bc25.com/safety-items-always-in-backpack-backcountry/) blog post and let me know how you feel about this list.

Have I missed anything? Too much? Too little?

thanks!

OK, this is just a shameless plug to get amazon referral kickbacks... Next..

Sarcasm the elf
11-16-2017, 22:53
Safety is so important in the backcountry and it's always a big dilemma for me deciding what to carry and, what to leave behind.

Take a look at this backcountry safety gear list (http://bc25.com/safety-items-always-in-backpack-backcountry/) blog post and let me know how you feel about this list.

Have I missed anything? Too much? Too little?

thanks!

#11: Mossberg 500.

gracebowen
11-17-2017, 00:07
Why would they get a fine or jail for using a spot?

Sarcasm the elf
11-17-2017, 00:17
Why would they get a fine or jail for using a spot?

Presumably they were beating somebody with it. Otherwise I'm at a loss as well.

Luna Anderson
11-17-2017, 05:14
These items is just for a day hike, if you're going to hike overnight, pls add the tent, tarp, sleeping bag, food container, stove...

D2maine
11-17-2017, 05:40
OK, this is just a shameless plug to get amazon referral kickbacks... Next..

why would you necro a 2 year old thread just to let everybody know this?

Another Kevin
11-17-2017, 12:05
Why do people still suggest old school fire starters? A bic lighter is cheap effective and reliable, just pop it in a ziplock or someother waterproof storage (say the plastic case that came with your PocketRocket perhaps, and your good to go. Tom accurately points out having the ability to start and maintain a fire in challenging conditions is esential for any of this to be useful.

I don't know what's 'old school' here. My 'go to' for lighting fires, including my alcohol stove, is a firesteel. I think it may have been lifesaving on one occasion when I slipped at a ford and wound up swimming - in 35įF air temperatures. I was getting hypothermic enough by the time I was starting a fire that I'm not sure I could have operated a Bic, but striking flint uses gross muscle coordination more than fine, and that worked. I knew the ford was dodgy, and gathered a small amount of wood on the near bank before starting to cross, to have a safe place to retreat. It had been raining for a week, but I found a mouse's nest for the first dry sticks and even a blown-down limb of a birch tree.

Also, I don't find Bics to be that reliable in deep winter (the butane doesn't evaporate well enough, the lighter gets chilled when I take it out even if I've had it inside my jacket), or if the wheel gets wet (as with falling in at a ford, see above). The cotton-ball-and-Vaseline fire starter and sparks from a firesteel is pretty foolproof.. Of course, you need the skills to lay a fire and keep it going once you've got it alight.

Of course, I'm an old dinosaur as well as being a clueless weekender, so the kids might be on to something I don't understand.

OCDave
11-17-2017, 14:50
Why do people still suggest old school fire starters? A bic lighter is cheap effective and reliable, ...l.

Perhaps because a firesteel is more reliable, wet or dry, lasts forever and has no moving parts to fail. Can't imagine choosing a Butate bic over a quality firesteel.

fiddlehead
11-17-2017, 16:25
Most important item (to me): Bic lighter.
Next: water.
Then: Phone, rain coat, sleeping bag, hat, gloves (depending on season), duct tape, piece of plastic (or tarp)

rocketsocks
11-17-2017, 19:57
Twice that I recall, my Bic’s **** the bed, both at an inipportune moment...but to be fair I think one was a cricket. It happens.

Sarcasm the elf
11-17-2017, 20:30
Most important: Bic Lighter
Second most important: Bic Pen
Third most important: Bic razor

But seriously I am a big fan of the bic lighter.

Redrowen
11-17-2017, 20:55
Why do people still suggest old school fire starters? A bic lighter is cheap effective and reliable, just pop it in a ziplock or someother waterproof storage (say the plastic case that came with your PocketRocket perhaps, and your good to go. Tom accurately points out having the ability to start and maintain a fire in challenging conditions is esential for any of this to be useful.

Old School Fire Starters are not fragile and susceptible to leaking or braking and will last a lifetime. Once proficient with it, all you do is toss it in your bag and never have to worry about it until in a time of need.

Ethesis
11-17-2017, 23:19
OK, this is just a shameless plug to get amazon referral kickbacks... Next..
Exactly. Those schemes annoy me.

Sarcasm the elf
11-17-2017, 23:48
Hilleberg tents are not fragile and susceptible to leaking or braking and will last a lifetime. Once proficient with it, all you do is toss it in your bag and never have to worry about it until in a time of need.
Fixed that for you. :rolleyes:

NY HIKER 50
11-18-2017, 13:29
Oh, I get it. Gotta watch these forums. Some of them are taken over by people trying to sell you things. Thee! I said it.

JJ505
12-09-2017, 22:00
@Demeter: Your's is a lot better.

kestral
12-09-2017, 23:21
About $800 per the article’s recomendations to go on a day hike! Buy,buy,buy and you will be safe !
i totally agree that knowledge and humility are much more important, along with basic water purification, shelter, rain protection and an additional layer for warmth. I think these articles are only designed to sell unnecessary and expensive gear to the newbe.

SoaknWet
12-10-2017, 07:17
As for the fines for using a SPOT. Seems I remember seeing an article about two morons who used theirs to try to get more pizza and beer delivered! I think that should be a fine and jail time!

D2maine
12-10-2017, 09:50
As for the fines for using a SPOT. Seems I remember seeing an article about two morons who used theirs to try to get more pizza and beer delivered! I think that should be a fine and jail time!

you can send text and e-mail with spot, not all communication is directly to emergency response, might be they simply did not understand the features correctly. even if the did hit the 911 button the rescue team would text them for the nature of the emergency before responding.

jail time with exclamation marks is just a tad harsh...

LAF
12-10-2017, 10:05
This! Well said


Now that is the best 10 essentials I have seen! Perfect!!!

JohnBelly
05-17-2018, 07:49
Well written article and great listing overall
Quite Helpful for me :)

Sarcasm the elf
05-17-2018, 09:35
https://i.imgflip.com/2aggab.jpg (https://imgflip.com/i/2aggab)via Imgflip Meme Generator (https://imgflip.com/memegenerator)

CalebJ
05-17-2018, 10:02
JohnBelly's posts are all odd comments like that.

KCNC
05-17-2018, 10:45
I attended a Wilderness First Aid course last weekend. The instructor reported several real-world scenarios. One was a group day-hiking a popular 8-ish mile trail in the Shenandoahs. Lady fell and busted up her leg about 4 miles up the trail on the way out, about 2:30 in the afternoon.

No cell service.

Someone walked out to find help, lucked up and met a ranger within 30 minutes.

It was 12:30 the next morning before they got her to the trailhead.

You can't be prepared for everything, but you can be prepared enough to avoid becoming another patient, even on a short day hike.

Riocielo
05-17-2018, 11:48
Sounds like a good list to get people to buy things...

Equipment can not replace knowledge.

1+


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Time Zone
05-17-2018, 21:27
I attended a Wilderness First Aid course last weekend. The instructor reported several real-world scenarios. One was a group day-hiking a popular 8-ish mile trail in the Shenandoahs. Lady fell and busted up her leg about 4 miles up the trail on the way out, about 2:30 in the afternoon.

No cell service.

Someone walked out to find help, lucked up and met a ranger within 30 minutes.

It was 12:30 the next morning before they got her to the trailhead.

You can't be prepared for everything, but you can be prepared enough to avoid becoming another patient, even on a short day hike.

What exactly is the lesson here? What should have been done differently?

KCNC
05-17-2018, 21:48
The lesson is to be prepared for unexpected circumstances, even if you're going on a short hike and expect to be home for dinner.

Have some snacks, a light, a jacket, etc. - you don't need 50 lbs of equipment, but a few basic items in case things go south.

If you end up weak and hypothermic with no way to see your way down the trail after dark then you aren't any good to anyone, you just became another liability - on top of the person who is already hurt.

As I said - you can't be prepared for everything, but you can be prepared enough to avoid becoming another patient.

BuckeyeBill
05-18-2018, 15:37
I feel that day hikers should carry the following in order of importance: Water, food/energy bars, Shelter of some type (could even be a cheap orange/shiny emergency blanket), some means to start a fire, rain jacket and warm clothes.

walkinmyshoes
08-07-2018, 04:52
And don't forget about warm clothing - cold weather gloves (https://under-the-open-sky.com/best-hunting-gloves/), socks, etc.

ErinKay
09-04-2018, 08:30
I think, you've collected a good list :sun

Venchka
09-04-2018, 08:34
One more time.
The 10 Sssentials.
They are still essential.
Wayne

Heliotrope
09-04-2018, 22:19
One more time.
The 10 Sssentials.
They are still essential.
Wayne

And letís not forget navigation tools. [emoji3]


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

nsherry61
09-05-2018, 08:45
One more time.
The 10 Sssentials.
They are still essential.
Sorry, but you just picked a pet peeve of mine.

The ten essentials are NOT essential. The ten essentials is a nice reminder list of gear or gear categories that should be seriously considered if you want to be prepared for a wide range of unexpected surprises when spending time in the back country. THEY ARE NOT ESSENTIAL!!

What do you think? Should we spend a few minutes shredding the "essential" idea of the ten essentials?

1) The 10 essentials won't keep you safe without the knowledge to use them wisely and effectively. So, suggesting that there are 10 essentials leads some people to think carrying such gear will keep them safe. IT WONT!

2) If you have the knowledge to use the 10 essentials wisely and effectively, you probably also have the knowledge to prune that list significantly depending on the type of trip you are taking, when you are going, how long you are going for, and where you are going.

3) The idea of the 10 essentials is focused primarily on day hiking or climbing since most of those essentials are automatically included for most all overnight trips. And frankly, a key point of the 10 essentials is being able to unexpectedly spend the night safely if you have to.

4) If we're talking day hikes, weather forecasts in some areas during some times of the year make the idea of hauling rain gear, shelter, and extra clothing just plain silly.

5) Nobody has died due to a lack of having an extra day of food while waiting for a rescue.

6) I don't need to carry water at all on trips where there is ample water along route.

7) I don't need to carry a map and/or compass in an area with straight forward topography that I hike regularly and know every trail in. . . although, I do almost always carry a map on compass.

8) I rarely carry any form of fire starter on a day hike unless it is winter. What is this obsession we have about being able to start a fire, especially in the middle of summer??!!

9) If we are concerned about safety, why haven't we updated the 10 essentials list to included electronic communication which has been transformative in saving lives in the back country with the advent of those new portable gadgets like cell phones and Satellite communicators and Personal Locator Beacons. Not to mention, if we added electronic communication to the 10 essentials we'd drive a lot of business and development money into that segment of the outdoor industry.

10) Why in the world isn't knowledge and training #1 on the ten essentials list. It's so, so much more useful than any of the other ten essential items, all of which are useful, just not essential.

Time Zone
09-05-2018, 10:33
It's still a good framework for considering whether you have your "bases covered." So hydration IS essential, but as you note, if there's ample water about, you simply check that off (and consider carrying a filter). It's still worth putting hydration on a list, just so that you have your plan for that figured out.

Some lists of essentials, e.g., REI, have gone from prescribing specific items, to recommending having a system or plan for a given category (hydration, illumination, insulation, navigation, etc).

The understanding and skill of using items you bring is implied; it does not need to be on the list as an item, IMO.

Electronics can be considered tools that meet one or more of the categories - navigation & illumination, for instance. One should be aware of their limitations, however. Batteries run down. The unit (or charger) may fail, either through blunt-force damage or component failure.

Anyway, while I agree that it's unnecessary to mindlessly pack a list of prescribed essentials for every situation, I do think going through a checklist of systems or categories is helpful in thinking through what you might need for a given hike if you get lost or hurt.

zelph
09-05-2018, 10:50
Quote:Most cases of hypothermia, during any season, occur when people are working or playing outdoors. In the summertime, hikers often fall prey to hypothermia because they fail to dress appropriately and plan for changes in the weather. This is especially true for those who set out to hike on mountainous trails. When the weather is hot and clear at the base of a mountain, people mistakenly believe it will also be hot and clear near the top, or will remain so throughout a long day of hiking.Heading up a long trail on a hot day wearing nothing but a pair of light shorts and a cotton t-shirt may seem like a good idea, but it can take as little as a heavy fog or a cool afternoon rain shower to create a life-threatening situation. Without a waterproof jacket, you can quickly become soaked through by cold rain or mist and get chilled. Because natural fabrics, like cotton, take a long time to dry, it can take hours to warm up — sometimes hours too long. There have even been reports of unexpected snowstorms claiming hikers’ lives in late spring and early summer.

zelph
09-05-2018, 17:49
If you read it already, read it again:

How to Survive Waterborne Diseases on the Appalachian Trail (https://thetrek.co/appalachian-trail/how-to-survive-waterborne-diseases-on-the-appalachian-trail/)
https://thetrek.co/appalachian-trail/how-to-survive-waterborne-diseases-on-the-appalachian-trail/

nsherry61
09-05-2018, 21:41
Quote:Most cases of hypothermia, during any season, occur when people are working or playing outdoors.
Now that's just plain brilliant! I thought it only occured indoors. :banana



In the summertime, hikers often fall prey to hypothermia because they fail to dress appropriately and plan for changes in the weather.

And, that gets to the point that knowledge is far more important than the gear, and basic knowledge and skills should really be #1 and #2. In the above cases, the ten essentials might have helped some people by encouraging them to bring warm cloths and rain gear. But then, the ten essentials is essentially a soundbite about being prepared. Taking the soundbite at face value, I can still die while bring all the extra warm cotton cloths, a tent I don't know how to set up, waterproof matches that don't help if I'm not really darn good at building a fire in the pouring rain (most people aren't), and a map and compass that I don't know how to use.

And, to reiterate the outdatedness of the ten essentials, if we are really using them as a guide for safe mountain travel, they really should to include electronic communication, as electronic communication devices have saved far more lives in the back country than an extra day of food, waterproof matches, or probably even a knife.

That being said, I often travel in the back country without electronic communication, without and extra day of food, without matches, and without a shelter. I do so rarely without a weather forecast however. I do it a lot. I'm still here. And, I have helped manage other people's emergency situations on multiple occasions without issue due to my choice of "essentials" that I do or don't take. In fact, I can't think of a time ever that I wished I had an "essential" that I didn't have. On the other hand, I have often wished I had and number of non-essentials that would have made my time more fun, more comfortable, or more adventurous.

Traveler
09-06-2018, 08:13
4) If we're talking day hikes, weather forecasts in some areas during some times of the year make the idea of hauling rain gear, shelter, and extra clothing just plain silly.

Except when it doesn't.

Weather can develop on a day hike with a forecast of sunny skies and 80 degrees that can cause people to leave rain gear and/or clothing that can keep you warm behind. I have had cloudbursts develop over me despite weather forecasts, some of them stalling over the area and brought temperatures down from the 80s into the 50s with a fairly stiff wind that exacerbated the condition.

These cloudbursts don't sound serious in casual discussion and are easily discounted as inconveniences, not how dangerous can they be in late July. These types of weather evens are not usually forecasted, will turn a dry trail slippery very quickly. Coupled with unsure footing, the potential of an accident increases greatly with wind driven rain impairing vision, which can lead to slips and falls. Fall by yourself and break a bone, hypothermia becomes a very real threat. Having been in those conditions before, it is impressive how fast the human body goes from hot to very cold.

Experience being the best teacher, its rare that I don't carry a shirt and/or rain jacket even on day hikes.

nsherry61
09-06-2018, 08:42
Weather can develop on a day hike with a forecast of sunny skies and 80 degrees that can cause people to leave rain gear and/or clothing that can keep you warm behind. I have had cloudbursts develop over me despite weather forecasts, some of them stalling over the area and brought temperatures down from the 80s into the 50s with a fairly stiff wind that exacerbated the condition.

Of course it can. And frankly, that is the danger of this discussion. As you say yourself, it is rare that you don't take extra clothing or rain-gear, but, there are apparently times when you probably prudently choose not to. And, I guess that is what I am getting at with my criticism of the soundbite nature of "The 10 Essentials". They are not essential, but they are absolutely wise to consider for every trip along with a good trip plan and telling people where you are going, practices which I almost, but not quite always adhear to.

So, in the end, I'm not interested in doing away with the 10 essentials. BUT, I do think they need to be treated with less dogmatic rhetoric and included in a broader discussion of being prepared and managing risk. In other words, the ten essentials are absolutely NOT essential and they DO NOT stand up on their own without a broader, knowledge driven context.

Venchka
09-06-2018, 10:25
If ONE Flatland Rubbernecker survives their own ignorance because they had the foresight to carry most, if not all, of the 10 items then I believe that the concept is worthwhile.
It is a matter for individuals to decide.
YMMV.
Wayne
PS:
Iím reminded of the group of college age individuals who were rescued from themselves on the AT after a winter snowfall. In February I believe.
Who knew that it could snow above 5,000í at night in February?
A member of the group said, and Iím paraphrasing, ďWe couldnít find any water. There was snow everywhere.Ē
You canít fix stupid.
Carry what you want.
Cheers!

rickb
09-06-2018, 14:28
I thought of this thread over the weekend while reading a list that a hostel had posted by their sign up sheet for those slacking over the Kinsman ridge.

Since they drop/pick up hikers (thrus mostly) at both ends, I asked what they did if hikers failed to show up for their ride. Seems it doesnít happen very often, but the hostel manager did end up putting together a crew to rescue one idiot SOBO in a storm who started his slack very late, without a flashlight, warm clothes or rain gear.

After hearing that, I donít blame them a bit for posting the reminder about taking some essential gear.

illabelle
09-06-2018, 15:08
Sorry, but you just picked a pet peeve of mine.

4) If we're talking day hikes, weather forecasts in some areas during some times of the year make the idea of hauling rain gear, shelter, and extra clothing just plain silly.


Except when it doesn't. ....

I think the key to understanding Nsherry's statement is "some areas" "some times of the year."

Most of us understand that there are some places (like big mountains) where sudden weather changes can increase the risk level at any time of year. Be prepared.

On the other hand, if I am day-hiking a familiar, low elevation trail in summertime temps of 80į and higher with a calm dry forecast, I can leave the rain gear, tent, and jacket behind. In that situation, packing the 10 essentials without considering whether they're actually needed simply because they're on a list is "just plain silly." All he's suggesting is to use our brains.

Venchka
09-06-2018, 16:01
On second thought...
The Terminally Clueless wonít know that a list of 10 Essentials exists. They wonít be prepared for anything.
Carry on.
Wayne

zelph
09-06-2018, 16:32
Now that's just plain brilliant! I thought it only occured indoors. https://whiteblaze.net/forum/images/smilies/banana.gif

It happened to me indoors. Food poisoning(Oriental Restaurant) When it advanced to "uncontrollable shivering" I was fully aware of how important it is to be prepared. I realized I would not be able to start a fire to get myself warmed up to stop the shivering. My wife came to my rescue 43620

Traveler
09-07-2018, 08:07
Of course it can. And frankly, that is the danger of this discussion. As you say yourself, it is rare that you don't take extra clothing or rain-gear, but, there are apparently times when you probably prudently choose not to. And, I guess that is what I am getting at with my criticism of the soundbite nature of "The 10 Essentials". They are not essential, but they are absolutely wise to consider for every trip along with a good trip plan and telling people where you are going, practices which I almost, but not quite always adhear to.

So, in the end, I'm not interested in doing away with the 10 essentials. BUT, I do think they need to be treated with less dogmatic rhetoric and included in a broader discussion of being prepared and managing risk. In other words, the ten essentials are absolutely NOT essential and they DO NOT stand up on their own without a broader, knowledge driven context.

We may be in "violent agreement" as Another Kevin would say. How can I get warm, how do I stay hydrated, how can I be found, which is the second post in this discussion, should always be considered before going off into the forest alone. For me, lists with labels like the "10 Essentials" act as a fair guideline. These are questions most everyone can ask themselves for any hiking activity, be it an hour walk in flat woods, a 10 hour day hike, or overnight jaunt.

I don't argue for the "10 Essentials" list per se to be included in every day pack, I do argue the elemental considerations above are at the root of the list. Its not just a simple walk in the woods if there is a slip or fall that immobilizes someone in an area where few hikers pass by. These considerations is why there is some gear that never leaves my pack regardless of where I am going or the prognostications of weather forecasters who have a fairly broad range of accuracy as I have experienced. Always in the pack are a rain jacket, a long sleeve technical fabric shirt, a CD disc (acts as a signal mirror), a whistle, a headlamp, wax covered matches and Vaseline coated cotton balls, water container, small knife, and a cap. As seasons change so does the pack contents, but those items are always with me when I have the pack.

BuckeyeBill
09-07-2018, 18:32
People say and do the dumbness things. If they didn't, Bill Ingvall wouldn't have much of a comic routine. In discussing the ten essentials, they can all be placed under four simple to remember rules of three.
The rules of three are in order:

1. 3 minutes without air. Should by any chance a person's windpipe be blocked or crusted, you have three minutes to act properly. Take a basic first aid class, learn CPR (things have changed in recent years) and remember if someone is choking and coughing they are still getting air. Learn the Heimlich maneuver.

2. 3 hours without shelter. Depending on the current and predicted weather reports, you could die. Under this rule you should have carried something that is specifically a shelter or something that can act ass a shelter. Your ability to start a fire is filed under this rule. While you're at it, put your map and compass or GPS device here too. Just make sure you know how to use them and they have the latest updates as far as road access goes. Don't forget that survival whistle. I can't remember where I downloaded it from, but I have an app/book on my phone that is the US Army survival manual. I covers many things about shelters how to obtain water without a lake or stream. First Aid is a couple of chapters long. Finally it shows various ways to set snares and traps for small game to supply you with food. It is somewhat dated, but is still enough to get you through tough times. If it has fur or feathers you can eat it.

3. 3 days without water. If you can't find a reliable water within 72 hours, your bodily functions will begin to shut down, and no you don't want to drink your urine. This is where water filters and or purifiers get filed. There are several lightweight units available and drops you can add that will kill any nastiness things that will harm you. Again a good map and compass or GPS unit should show the way to water sources. Try and get as closest to the source of the water as possible to avoid animal feces in the water or being secreted into the water.

4. 3 weeks without food. Here is where prior planning prevents pi** poor performance. The extra time set planning ahead will leave you not carrying coming in short of food. I usually carry an extra days worth of full meals and plenty of extra high calorie/protein snacks. home made gorp, peanut butter and any thing else I can find without a ton of extra weight.

The four rules of three are easy to remember and will act as triggers for the other items mentioned under them. While some of what I have written would not apply to the AT or other trails, I have hiked in places where you can get into a bad situation rather quickly if you don't have the right things with you, even on a day hike. I hope this helps , if not then just ignore it.

zelph
09-07-2018, 20:11
People say and do the dumbness things. If they didn't, Bill Ingvall wouldn't have much of a comic routine. In discussing the ten essentials, they can all be placed under four simple to remember rules of three.
The rules of three are in order:

I like it, "The Rules of Three"....thank you!

TexasBob
09-07-2018, 20:51
Why not just put the 10 essentials in your day pack and quit worrying about it? It is a day hike so what is the big deal about carrying a pound or two of stuff you might not need depending on the season? Does it really make that big a difference? Better to be over prepared than have an "Oh crud" moment when you realize that you need those items you left at home because you out smarted yourself.

nsherry61
09-07-2018, 20:52
. . . the US Army survival manual. I covers many things . . .

Don't get me started on that one. . . or do.


. . . about shelters how to obtain water without a lake or stream. . . Finally it shows various ways to set snares and traps for small game to supply you with food. It is somewhat dated, but is still enough to get you through tough times. If it has fur or feathers you can eat it.

Those army survival manuals often have a few good ideas in them buried in a lot of crazy stuff that is completely impractical in a real survival situation unless maybe you have an army and have no intention of self rescuing.

Snares and traps . . . give me a break.
1) Have you ever tried to feed yourself on snared and/or trapped animals? In most cases you spend more energy trapping than you ever will get out of any animals you catch.
2) Under almost no circumstances will you ever catch enough game to sustain yourself. You are far better using that same time and energy moving through your environment toward self rescue than you are trying to catch a measly few bites of food. As you note in your post, you have three weeks before starvation sets in, so why are you wasting your time and energy trying to catch food instead of trying to get out and find help? . . . this is also my biggest pet peeve about almost every TV survival show. Why would anyone stay put trapping food and building elaborate survival shelters when there are few places, at least in the lower 48 United States, that are more than a couple days walk from help. Even if you're lost, two to three days walk in any single direction pretty much anywhere will get you within reach of assistance.
As for collecting water, again the "Army Survival Manuals" often have some good ideas, but some are just silly. Kinda like food and shelter . . . a solar still? Really? You want to sit around all day in the sun to collect a cup of water? If you can move, just move out, find what water you can along the way, find what shelter you can to stay safe if you need to stop, and get the heck out of dodge!! Go find help. If you can't move, well, you can't run a trap line and you can't build an elaborate shelter either, so now, we're back to the 10 essentials maybe being a better idea than the army survival manual.


. . . I usually carry an extra days worth of full meals and plenty of extra high calorie/protein snacks. home made gorp, peanut butter and any thing else I can find without a ton of extra weight.

Really? Why? Sure, cary some snacks you love to help lift your spirits. But whole meals of extra food? Again, back to your point about 3 weeks without food. . .

RockDoc
09-08-2018, 12:23
Typical list from a Millennial beginner. Forget the high tech gadgets. They fail when you really need them. Ask Search and Rescue.
At least she didn't say to carry a cell phone.

Venchka
09-08-2018, 13:34
The Mountaineers have published a generic list since forever. In print. From the library even.
https://www.mountaineers.org/blog/what-are-the-ten-essentials
For those who feel the need for a list.
Wayne

BuckeyeBill
09-08-2018, 19:03
I like it, "The Rules of Three"....thank you!

Thanks Zelph. I'm glad someone sees the bigger picture of the rules than just in their backyard.

Traffic Jam
09-09-2018, 20:45
Oh geez...I’m going to die. I’m lucky if i remember to pack half that stuff. Usually (for dayhikes) it’s only my FAK, water, lunch, map, and maybe a jacket. Once, I was too lazy to pack food so went without. Not sayin’ it’s the right way but it’s my way.

(My whistle and knife are missing so haven't carried those in a while.)

:)

Dogwood
09-10-2018, 14:15
The overall list is not particularly bad but safety items should mirror the type of trip, who one is, what one is capable of, and should include experience if just a full demo with those safety items. For example, I see little use personally for a SAT ph or PLB on the AT between may - sept in otherwise "normalized" conditions. Yes, some folks consider the AT to have backcountry segments. I've seen others carry them, full FAKs, PLBs, compasses, maps, extra "safety" apparel, etc on front country and "backcountry?" high use highly maintained trails at high use times and they didnt know how to apply these items. These become similar to snake bite kits of the past.- wasted items to carry unless they meet someone else that knows how to apply these items....which IMO takes away from the notion of what backcountry is. Rarely to never do I see an absolute need for a heavy Leatherman multitool w/ screw drivers, bottle opener, corkscrew, multiple blades, nail file, etc.

Dogwood
09-10-2018, 14:26
Geraldine Largay relied too much on electronic connectivity which led to her death. She had extra food and water, maps, compass, cell ph, shelter, etc. She did leave her PLB behind which could have helped/saved her. BUT, what could ALSO have helped her regain the AT was some sense of which side of the AT she stepped off. If it was to her right and as she knew she was hiking NOBO with the AT generally running a north/NW direction she could have used her compass to head generally west to cross the well established known path of the AT. She was not injured. Sometimes survival is dependent on yourself traveling out NOT staying put especially with dwindling supplies and no more electronic connectivity after many days. I'm strongly opinionated the MOST IMPORTANT safety item to ever take into the backcountry is a widened skill set that is powered by emotionally level headed controlled awareness, thoughts, knowledge and wisdom.

rickb
09-10-2018, 15:47
I'm strongly opinionated the MOST IMPORTANT safety item to ever take into the backcountry is a widened skill set that is powered by emotionally level headed controlled awareness, thoughts, knowledge and wisdom.

Agreed.

In part because those skilled hikers will have thought to bring a flashlight if there is a realistic possibility that they might still be in the woods after sunset, or a rain jacket or such if there is a realistic possibility they might get caught in chilly downpour, or even a map if they are unfamiliar with the area.

We have a much-climbed mountain in southern NH that gets the gear part.

At the main enterence (not the best staring place for those who know Mount Monadnock, but most folks start there) the check in area will not only sell hikers lights and batteries and layers and snacks, but even microspikes.

I have no way of knowing, but I’ll bet helping new hikers with stuff — and experienced hikers who just were not thinking when they headed to the mountain — has cut down on the nuisance rescues by more than a little.

They even help impart a bit of wisdom — at least to the extent posting when sunset is qualifies as wisdom.

Venchka
09-10-2018, 16:05
The Mountaineers have published a generic list since forever. In print. From the library even.
https://www.mountaineers.org/blog/what-are-the-ten-essentials
For those who feel the need for a list.
Wayne
For the late comers.
Wayne

nsherry61
09-10-2018, 16:22
I haven't read that bit in Freedom for years. Thanks. I love how the original text is often so much more informative and informed than references to it. Right there in black and white the authors themselves are expressing that the 10 essentials is a tickler list to be edited as needed with knowledge of both your skill and the environment you will be in. At no point is there any suggestion that one should always pack the ten essentials, but rather use the list as a reminder to make sure you've thought through the things are are likely to be, but aren't necessarily, essential for your particular hike or climb.

Venchka
09-10-2018, 16:29
I haven't read that bit in Freedom for years. Thanks. I love how the original text is often so much more informative and informed than references to it. Right there in black and white the authors themselves are expressing that the 10 essentials is a tickler list to be edited as needed with knowledge of both your skill and the environment you will be in. At no point is there any suggestion that one should always pack the ten essentials, but rather use the list as a reminder to make sure you've thought through the things are are likely to be, but aren't necessarily, essential for your particular hike or climb.
Exactly! Non-commercial low tech suggestions. One of my oldest bookmarks. I used to bring the book home from library all the time.
Wayne

SawnieRobertson
09-10-2018, 19:56
As we look towards the coming 10 days or so, I wonder if waterings or more serious life preservers might be worth their weight. Nah.

Venchka
09-10-2018, 20:00
As we look towards the coming 10 days or so, I wonder if waterings or more serious life preservers might be worth their weight. Nah.
Stay on high ground. Avoid sitting under trees. Hiking probably isn't a good idea.
Wayne

BuckeyeBill
09-11-2018, 09:52
No spirit of adventure there Wayne?

Venchka
09-11-2018, 10:06
No spirit of adventure there Wayne?
Too many years on the Gulf Coast. I donít do hurricanes if I can help it.
I go West for my adventures.
Wayne

BuckeyeBill
09-11-2018, 10:08
I'm with you on this. Just need to worry about earth shakers if you go too far.

Venchka
09-11-2018, 12:43
I'm with you on this. Just need to worry about earth shakers if you go too far.
Grinning. I know where to stop.
I donít go too far West.
Wayne

Dogwood
09-11-2018, 13:37
Why not just put the 10 essentials in your day pack and quit worrying about it? It is a day hike so what is the big deal about carrying a pound or two of stuff you might not need depending on the season? Does it really make that big a difference? Better to be over prepared than have an "Oh crud" moment when you realize that you need those items you left at home because you out smarted yourself.
How far do the majority of hikers get into the remote "backcountry" on a day hike anyway? Is it REALLY all that backcountry most day hikers get into? C'mon. IMO the vast majority of day hikers dont veer more than 10 miles from a TH or their car or a road(sometimes major well traveled one) or from a NP lodge, etc for a RT 20 miler. I'd muse the vast majority of day hikers dont even go 20 miles RT! The safety essentials should mirror the situation, trip, and one's abilities. OMG more FAK's with more stuff most folks dont know how to use as they dont have the knowledge. How much/how often do conditions dictate that a party needs a SAT or PLB in such day hike situations? Going solo to truly remote sites or encountering dangerous situations like The Maze or canyoneering on perhaps longer distance off trail day hikes the stakes are raised. How many day hikes does that include among all those doing day hikes?

TexasBob
09-12-2018, 19:52
How far do the majority of hikers get into the remote "backcountry" on a day hike anyway? Is it REALLY all that backcountry most day hikers get into? C'mon. IMO the vast majority of day hikers dont veer more than 10 miles from a TH or their car or a road(sometimes major well traveled one) or from a NP lodge, etc for a RT 20 miler. I'd muse the vast majority of day hikers dont even go 20 miles RT! The safety essentials should mirror the situation, trip, and one's abilities. OMG more FAK's with more stuff most folks dont know how to use as they dont have the knowledge. How much/how often do conditions dictate that a party needs a SAT or PLB in such day hike situations? Going solo to truly remote sites or encountering dangerous situations like The Maze or canyoneering on perhaps longer distance off trail day hikes the stakes are raised. How many day hikes does that include among all those doing day hikes?

If you are out by yourself I believe you should be prepared whether it is 5 miles or 50 miles back to the trailhead. I have never been in a car crash were I needed a seat belt but I won't drive without one on. Just because I haven't needed it doesn't mean I won't someday. I have the same attitude about the 10 essentials. Serious, what is the penalty for carrying the 10 essentials? I just don't get it.

nsherry61
09-12-2018, 20:09
. . . Serious, what is the penalty for carrying the 10 essentials? I just don't get it.
Because, for many of us, the ten essentials are not the same for each trip. So, why not just cary what you need for each trip. From one trip to the next I may want a more or less complex first aid kit. I may want a rain coat one day and a poncho the next. For a remote winter trip I may want a significantly more substantial shelter than I would carry on a short summer jaunt. I may not feel like taking the time to find and print out a map or an area I'm familiar with while I may want detailed maps on another trip. Why carry and empty water bottle if I have plenty of water along route and will treat and drink (or not treat) as appropriate along the trail. Frankly, I rarely give a rip about whether or not I have the ability to start a fire, so why bother carrying matches and fire starter for above treeline or in mid summer when nights get down to 60 degrees at most.

Since I tune my gear for each trip, I don't have a static bag of gear that I take each time. Since I'm going through and figuring out what I need for each trip and some trips don't need some of the ten essentials, why would I put them in my bag and add useless weight and bulk.

Seriously, what is the penalty for tuning your gear for each trip? I just don't get it.

BuckeyeBill
09-14-2018, 03:01
Because, for many of us, the ten essentials are not the same for each trip. So, why not just cary what you need for each trip. From one trip to the next I may want a more or less complex first aid kit. I may want a rain coat one day and a poncho the next. For a remote winter trip I may want a significantly more substantial shelter than I would carry on a short summer jaunt. I may not feel like taking the time to find and print out a map or an area I'm familiar with while I may want detailed maps on another trip. Why carry and empty water bottle if I have plenty of water along route and will treat and drink (or not treat) as appropriate along the trail. Frankly, I rarely give a rip about whether or not I have the ability to start a fire, so why bother carrying matches and fire starter for above treeline or in mid summer when nights get down to 60 degrees at most.

Since I tune my gear for each trip, I don't have a static bag of gear that I take each time. Since I'm going through and figuring out what I need for each trip and some trips don't need some of the ten essentials, why would I put them in my bag and add useless weight and bulk.

Seriously, what is the penalty for tuning your gear for each trip? I just don't get it.

You bring up some valid points about tuning gear for each trip. I wonder how many "rookie" or lightly experienced hiker packed gear to handle a hurricane. More experienced hikers "know when to hold 'em and know when to fold 'em" so to speak. I see a lot of posts from members about "I'm going to do a weekend or two week hike thru so and so, should I be worried about the weather?" This is the penalty for not carrying the 10 essentials and not properly planning your trip. Until they start selling crystal balls at REI I'm going to pack all ten essentials.

Traveler
09-14-2018, 06:45
You bring up some valid points about tuning gear for each trip. I wonder how many "rookie" or lightly experienced hiker packed gear to handle a hurricane. More experienced hikers "know when to hold 'em and know when to fold 'em" so to speak. I see a lot of posts from members about "I'm going to do a weekend or two week hike thru so and so, should I be worried about the weather?" This is the penalty for not carrying the 10 essentials and not properly planning your trip. Until they start selling crystal balls at REI I'm going to pack all ten essentials.

Maybe thats the clue, inexperienced hikers may benefit from the "10 essentials", experience then takes over so the essentials can be trimmed or changed for the hike. Since we are not born with this knowledge, the learning process has to start somewhere.

nsherry61
09-14-2018, 08:44
. . . Until they start selling crystal balls at REI I'm going to pack all ten essentials.
To quote the Mountaineers Blog directly addressing the origin of the 10 essentials in their book "Freedom of the Hills" . . .

"The Ten Essentials is a guide that should be tailored to the nature of the trip. Weather, remoteness from help, and complexity should be factored into the selected essentials."

Why do we have such a tendency to turn good advice and guidelines into absolute dogma? I think we should treat the ten essentials an a gift of wisdom, not a club of law. A birthday dinner is a beautiful thing, but if I am allergic to dairy, it's best I leave the icecream for others to eat, and if the portions are extra

BuckeyeBill
09-14-2018, 09:03
Maybe thats the clue, inexperienced hikers may benefit from the "10 essentials", experience then takes over so the essentials can be trimmed or changed for the hike. Since we are not born with this knowledge, the learning process has to start somewhere.

You are very correct. That's why I would never tell anyone who asked if the ten essentials are needed, no they are not. I figure if they have to ask, they need to pack them.

Ethesis
09-14-2018, 11:21
Why do people still suggest old school fire starters? A bic lighter is cheap effective and reliable, just pop it in a ziplock or someother waterproof storage (say the plastic case that came with your PocketRocket perhaps, and your good to go. Tom accurately points out having the ability to start and maintain a fire in challenging conditions is esential for any of this to be useful.


It doesnít even need fuel for the flint and steel part to work.

Traffic Jam
09-15-2018, 09:19
The overall list is not particularly bad but safety items should mirror the type of trip, who one is, what one is capable of, and should include experience if just a full demo with those safety items. For example, I see little use personally for a SAT ph or PLB on the AT between may - sept in otherwise "normalized" conditions. Yes, some folks consider the AT to have backcountry segments. I've seen others carry them, full FAKs, PLBs, compasses, maps, extra "safety" apparel, etc on front country and "backcountry?" high use highly maintained trails at high use times and they didnt know how to apply these items. These become similar to snake bite kits of the past.- wasted items to carry unless they meet someone else that knows how to apply these items....which IMO takes away from the notion of what backcountry is. Rarely to never do I see an absolute need for a heavy Leatherman multitool w/ screw drivers, bottle opener, corkscrew, multiple blades, nail file, etc.
Good post. Nothing replaces some common sense and experience. Experience has taught me that I can survive just fine when I run out of food, fuel, or water, or forget to pack my shelter, headlamp, fire-making supplies, knife, whistle, maps, communication device, rain clothes, socks, hat... ;)

If a hiker needs to plan for every contingency in order enjoy the outdoors, go for it. People just need to get outside and go for a walk, no matter how they do it.

attroll
09-17-2018, 20:02
Fix test.

<b>Here</b>

Wise Old Owl
10-28-2018, 20:46
Fix test.

<b>Here</b> Not sure what this is about but what an old thread from 2015 and wow a wealth of information.

MaryaliceRitchlin
02-03-2019, 03:57
I always keep the following safety items while camping:

First Aid Kit: My kit consists of basic painkillers, ointments, bandage tapes etc.
Survival Knife: It is not enough good for fishing and hunting but could also be a great tool for self-defence.
Trash Bags: These are being used on regular basis but most of the campers neglect its importance.
Security Items for Wild Campings: I always keep a sharp small knife, a gun, a flashlight and a good plate carrier (https://bestazy.com/best-plate-carriers/) whenever I go for hunting in wild areas with my husband.
Pest Sprays and Repellents: Yes, these are also necessary.
Other things: GPS devices, maps, water, food, water proof clothes and fire burning stuff.

CalebJ
02-05-2019, 15:55
I always keep the following safety items while camping:

First Aid Kit: My kit consists of basic painkillers, ointments, bandage tapes etc.
Survival Knife: It is not enough good for fishing and hunting but could also be a great tool for self-defence.
Trash Bags: These are being used on regular basis but most of the campers neglect its importance.
Security Items for Wild Campings: I always keep a sharp small knife, a gun, a flashlight and a good plate carrier (https://bestazy.com/best-plate-carriers/) whenever I go for hunting in wild areas with my husband.
Pest Sprays and Repellents: Yes, these are also necessary.
Other things: GPS devices, maps, water, food, water proof clothes and fire burning stuff.

Where are you going that a plate carrier has value?

Sarcasm the elf
02-05-2019, 15:57
Where are you going that a plate carrier has value?

Flavortown.

kevperro
02-24-2019, 12:50
A way to keep warm, dry, hydrated, and get found.

Bingo... maybe add the common sense not to work yourself into exhaustion. I find when people make the dumbest mistakes is when they are physically at their limits. Don't put yourself in that state and you remove a significant amount of risk.

cmoulder
02-24-2019, 18:36
Where are you going that a plate carrier has value?
I think I'd find somebody else to go with. Husband? scratch... Dick Cheney?... scratch Greg Lemond's brother-in-law.... scratch

woodword2020
04-29-2019, 12:17
My bic lighter has worked after I have accidentally put it through the washer and dryer.

Thrifty Endurance
05-16-2019, 22:18
Holy cow! I think a lot has changed since AliciaG wrote this article in 2015. I would remark what my grandpa taught me at age six...it is always BETTER to have multiple devices for starting fire. I have two fire starters and one Bic lighter, but can make my own fire out of the forest resources, if needed. That first aid pack is not necessary during a thru-hike or hiking multiple days in the backcountry. It's too bulky. In wilderness first aid, you learn to improvise and use the things you already have. A lot of people don't think of about this but you can source rain water if you can't find any viable water source. I would definitely filter it first. ATStrong