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squeezebox
04-02-2015, 11:32
Yesterday I lost my wallet.
I was a block away from my house decided to change out of my shorts. I put my wallet on top of my car, forgot about it and drove off. 10 minutes later I recognized my mistake. Went back, no wallet. It took me 4 hours to change credit cards, debit card, checking account. luckily I've been at the same bank for 15 years, so they bent the rules and let me start a new account without ID and take out some cash, and gave me a few checks to use. Otherwise they would have required a birth certificate. Nor easy to get out of state. The driver license folks accepted a 20 year old license as ID. So I got a new ID. All of the plastic cards are gonna take 1-2 weeks to get to me. I also lost the $50 in my wallet.
But my main point is how much worse this situation would be if I was on the trail out of state.
Maybe we should take a copy of our birth certificate in case we lose our ID.

Walkintom
04-02-2015, 11:42
I keep a digital picture, front and back of my driver's license on my phone and in a cloud location.

Lyle
04-02-2015, 11:46
I lost mine once at the very beginning of a trip. Got a shuttle from Carver Gap in NJ, back to Lehigh Gap, PA. My shuttle driver was the owner of the Outfitter in DWG. On the way to Lehigh, we stopped at the bakery in DWG for coffee. When we got to Lehigh, I went to pay for the shuttle and couldn't find my wallet. Searched the car several times, went through my pack, even though I knew it had been in my pocket, was pretty frustrated and "knew not what to do".

The shuttle driver, just on a whim, called the bakery. My wallet had been found in the parking lot and turned in to them, and still had cash in it! He asked them to hold it for me until I hiked to DWG. I then instructed him to help himself to the payment for the shuttle when he got back to DWG (he was good friends with the Bakery folks, so that wouldn't be a problem). He even offered to loan me some cash until I was reunited with my wallet, but I had no need for that so refused and thanked him profusely. When I passed through DWG, I picked up the wallet and gave a "reward" to the employee that held it for me.

No way to express how relieved I was, and how thankful. You are right, the prospect of being far from home, with no money, no ID, no credit cards - NOT PLEASANT.

garlic08
04-02-2015, 11:49
Sometimes we are our own worst enemy. First rule of a road trip--never, ever, put anything on top of the car, even "just for a sec." At least it wasn't a baby! Good luck getting back on track.

On the trail, it is of paramount importance to keep your valuables on your person at all times, and when doing laundry or bathing extra care is needed. Not so much for theft, but for simply leaving things behind. I once found a bright yellow SPOT device in the corner of an empty AT shelter, for instance.

A passport should work for good ID instead of a birth certificate, and on some trails a passport may be required, or a real good idea, anyway. I carried mine on the PNT because many of my possible bail out points were into Canada. I carried it separately from my other valuables, in a map bag, and kept the number written down along with other account numbers and important phone numbers in yet another place.

colorado_rob
04-02-2015, 11:57
I keep a digital picture, front and back of my driver's license on my phone and in a cloud location.Fantastic idea, thanks. Sorry OP, I have a similar story, won't bore anyone with details, but agree, lesson learned never, ever leave a wallet or anything valuable on top of a car... (I left mine on a rear bumper! equally bad idea...)

swisscross
04-02-2015, 12:15
Driving cross country to see the Dead in Oregon I left my wallet on top of the car.
Did not notice my mistake until the next refill and had no idea where I might have lost it.

A MT Sherriff had found it and mailed it to my folks.

I called days later to check in with my parents and my father asked "did I lose something"?

Way before cell phones. All cash was there.
Traveling with a group I was able to borrow until we got home.

Those were some fine shows.
Little Feat opened both days.

Crazy Larry #1
04-02-2015, 12:29
Good advice.............
Yesterday I lost my wallet.
I was a block away from my house decided to change out of my shorts. I put my wallet on top of my car, forgot about it and drove off. 10 minutes later I recognized my mistake. Went back, no wallet. It took me 4 hours to change credit cards, debit card, checking account. luckily I've been at the same bank for 15 years, so they bent the rules and let me start a new account without ID and take out some cash, and gave me a few checks to use. Otherwise they would have required a birth certificate. Nor easy to get out of state. The driver license folks accepted a 20 year old license as ID. So I got a new ID. All of the plastic cards are gonna take 1-2 weeks to get to me. I also lost the $50 in my wallet.
But my main point is how much worse this situation would be if I was on the trail out of state.
Maybe we should take a copy of our birth certificate in case we lose our ID.

steve0423
04-02-2015, 12:36
Something else to think about…
For my 2013 thru, I opened a separate account at my bank (in Missouri) and used a debit card for several purchases. I kept some cash on me for hostels, mom and pop businesses etc., but for larger $ amounts and grocery store/big boxes I used the card. In PA my feet got wider and I needed to replace my shoes with a larger size. At the Cabelea’s in Port Clinton my card got denied. I’d made purchases from GA all the way to PA when my bank suddenly found the account activities suspect and locked it down until I called to explain. In the grand scheme it was a minor pain in the A$$, but still something to keep in mind.

perrymk
04-02-2015, 16:21
It's not an uncommon practice to have several credit cards for different uses. The idea is fraudulent charges /lost cards are most likely to occur while traveling. Having to update the card for all safe, recurring charges is a hassle so use a different card.

CC1 - for safe, recurring expenses. magazine subscriptions, newspaper subscriptions, online vendors one is familiar with and shops with frequently, etc.
CC2 - for shopping at unknown establishments or traveling.
CC2 - for business use only to keep separate from personal charges

bigcranky
04-02-2015, 16:58
Useful things to keep: your old driver's license when you renew. The DMV will usually accept an expired license as ID. I also photocopy or take a digital photo of everything in my wallet. If I'm traveling I have it available in the cloud (though there are security concerns) and also leave a copy with a family member. That makes it a lot easier to know whom to call to cancel cards, etc. Also keep copies of your passport.

On the morning we left for the Long Trail last summer, we had a fraudulent charge on our main (and normally only) credit card. Man, tough to travel for a month+ with no credit card. I had just received a second card from USAA, but never used it. I called them up, explained where we were going, and they were great - everything went through. (I got the second card after the whole fraud thing happened more than once in the same year - man, what a total pain in the rear.)

HeartFire
04-02-2015, 17:06
a friend of mine lost her wallet - downtown Asheville, it fell in the street. Wallet was made from tyvek - next day, it was still in the street. People must have seen it, thought it was trash and left it there.

rocketsocks
04-02-2015, 18:51
I lost mine once at the very beginning of a trip. Got a shuttle from Carver Gap in NJ, back to Lehigh Gap, PA. My shuttle driver was the owner of the Outfitter in DWG. On the way to Lehigh, we stopped at the bakery in DWG for coffee. When we got to Lehigh, I went to pay for the shuttle and couldn't find my wallet. Searched the car several times, went through my pack, even though I knew it had been in my pocket, was pretty frustrated and "knew not what to do".

The shuttle driver, just on a whim, called the bakery. My wallet had been found in the parking lot and turned in to them, and still had cash in it! He asked them to hold it for me until I hiked to DWG. I then instructed him to help himself to the payment for the shuttle when he got back to DWG (he was good friends with the Bakery folks, so that wouldn't be a problem). He even offered to loan me some cash until I was reunited with my wallet, but I had no need for that so refused and thanked him profusely. When I passed through DWG, I picked up the wallet and gave a "reward" to the employee that held it for me.

No way to express how relieved I was, and how thankful. You are right, the prospect of being far from home, with no money, no ID, no credit cards - NOT PLEASANT.You were always in good hands. The owner of "into the woods" outfitter, Chuck, his family owns the bakery, and the chicken pot pie is awesome...ate a whole one myself, good coffee too, pastries..fugataboutit, good stuff! hit em up.

Migrating Bird
04-02-2015, 21:02
First day on a 2 week vacation in Maui, I lost my wallet, a granite gear nylon thin hiking wallet, drivers license, credit cards and $100 in cash. Retraced my steps and there it was laying in the middle of a sidewalk. I walked the 8 miles back the hotel just to drive home point as to how stupid, lucky I was.

sfdoc
04-02-2015, 21:30
About 15 years ago, when going for a 5-6 hour bike ride in NJ, I left my wallet on top of my car, in the roof rack of a Jeep Cherokee. When I realized it about 3 hours later, I called a store near that parking lot, actually a parking lot for a train station, and asked one who worked there, a complete stranger, if they would go out, retrieve my wallet, and hold it for me. They did all I asked. I rewarded the individual in spite of protestations. There are still good people in this world. In the 5-6 hour interim, I was VERY nervous, but it worked out.

Damn Yankee
04-02-2015, 22:14
I lost my wallet once, only ONCE. Biggest pain in my butt. Hopefully I won't make that mistake again. Lost my checkbook once also, just like you lost your wallet. Luckely I drove around and retraced my steps and found it in the middle of the road. Glad all worked out for you.

squeezebox
04-02-2015, 22:15
I'm the OP, I have one of those European style neck pouches that will fit my Zpack wallet, cash, cards, med info etc. I believe it's waterproof. I might even shower with it on.

Fredt4
04-02-2015, 23:40
A photo copy of your passport, birthcerficate, and other docs is generally worthless at dmv now days due to increased requirements. A copy of my drivers license that I kept on the cloud by emailing it to my self has got me a motel room several times. Travelers checks can be recovered by having the serial numbers again by email. Be sure your remember your password.
A passport card is less weight and travels better than a passport, just keep it separate from your wallet. Or get a state issued id.

squeezebox
04-03-2015, 02:32
Again I'm the OP. My original point was, yes at home I lost $50, and it took all morning to get things straightened out. The bank knew me and bent the rules. It will take 1-2 weeks to get replacement plastic. They let me take out some cash, and gave me a few checks. My ID will take 2 weeks, right now it's a sheet of paper with my picture in the corner.
But on the trail, out of town, out of state! What a nightmare it would be. No money, no ID, all they say it will take 2 weeks. if even that. I'm an RN so my fingerprints are on record, that might help to ID
I wouldn't consider carrying a copy of my birth certificate or an old license before, now I will.
What would happen if you lost your ID on the trail??

garlic08
04-03-2015, 08:13
I don't remember ever needing to show a photo ID while hiking within the US borders, but I usually have my passport in my map bag anyway. If I lost my DL on trail, I'd notify the DMV and then worry about it when I got back home.

Astro
04-03-2015, 10:25
Once found a wallet wedged in the seat of a commercial airplane. Gave it to the attendant. Was tempted to count the money and mail the person later to see if all the money made it back to them, but figured it would just upset them if it didn't.

soilman
04-03-2015, 10:42
I ran into two people who lost their wallets on my thru hike. One left his essential bag with money, id, meds, etc. at the Blueberry Patch Hostel. Luckily when we stopped for lunch the day we left the hostel he needed to take his meds and realized his mistake. He called Gary and after about 20 minutes of searching Gary found it and called back. He then had to hike back to the hostel. Another hiker lost her wallet off the trail when she stopped for a comfort stop. I ran into her at the trailhead at Wind Gap. She was in a panic. She was going to hitch to DWG and try to figure out what to do. Lucky for her, a hiker following her set up camp where she stopped and found her wallet. He took it to her at DWG and she thanked him by treating him to a raft trip.

illabelle
04-03-2015, 11:44
On most trips I carry an expired DL, a credit card I rarely use, and a little cash. Husband carries more. On a trip north, by air, I forgot to bring current ID to the airport security line. They let me through reluctantly, and only after "special handling." Won't make that mistake again!

We found a wallet over Thanksgiving on the trail in Georgia. Took a bit to locate a phone number for the owner, but they were grateful to have it back. If you carry your wallet on your person while hiking, I'd suggest keeping it in a pocket you're not using for other things. My guess is that this guy's wallet fell out while he was getting something else from that pocket.

Bronk
04-03-2015, 12:02
Dude you need to do your banking somewhere else if they're telling you it takes 1 to 2 weeks to replace a debit or credit card. I had a credit card fraud issue awhile back and needed to cancel a card and I called them at 3pm and Fed Ex was on my porch at 1030 the next morning with a new card...and my bank didn't charge me anything for it.

Wolf - 23000
04-03-2015, 12:31
On my first AT thru-hike many years ago, I lost my wallet too Story Spring Shelter, VT. I spent a full day looking everywhere for it. Sad to say, I believe a hiker going the opposite direction stole it from me. It had my ID, some pictures, and a little bit of money.

4 years later, while doing the PCT, out of the blue a package was sent to my home from VT. When my Mom opened the package, it turned out to be my wallet I had lost. It was all weather and the pictures were destroyed. A hiker had found my wallet in the woods and mailed it back to me. It was really nice of someone.

My point being, never give up hope. It still might pop-up when you donít expect it.

Wolf

Sly
04-04-2015, 16:55
I've lost my wallet out of state with license and credit cards and have everything replaced online or on the phone (mailed to a friends address) within a couple days. I was lucky I had a bit of cash to tide me over though.

Hoop
04-04-2015, 19:50
500 mi from home lost wallet at interstate rest stop in VA, had enough gas to get to destination in Maryland. No other ID, no money. Saturday morning at bank, had to convince skeptical manager I'm me. Asked her to pull debit card (has image of my face) from computer, and there I was, so she issued me a temp card on the spot. She also could confirm the fuel and food I'd bought the day before (I had receipts). Anyhoo, in a few days I open the mailbox and there's the wallet - maintenance guy mowing found it in the grass on entrance ramp. All there except the cash. I'd taken steps to replace everything but it was heartwarming for a stranger to make the effort.

Bronk
04-05-2015, 09:09
Dealing with the lost and found where I work I can tell you that "found" wallets almost never have any cash in them. And judging from the description many people give of where/how they found them the person who turns the wallet in to lost and found is almost never the first person to have found it...my guess is the first finder takes the cash and tosses the wallet for someone else to find. Though one time someone did turn in a wallet with about $800 in it.

swjohnsey
04-05-2015, 10:27
It is always a good idea to have an ID that will get you on an airline, a credit card and a little cash squirreled away when you travel.