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View Full Version : How many boils do you get per small canister?



saltysack
05-07-2015, 09:53
I realize there are several variables.....
In planning my 15 day JMT thru I'm trying to gauge re supply....
I use a SP lite max stove with SP 600 to pot/mug...
I always shield wind with pack, tent etc. How does altitude effect canister? I always sleep with canister if in cold weather. I've never been out more than 4 days at a time and start with a new canister....I use partials to boil water for coffee at home not to waste before throw in recycle bin..usually boil approx 2 cups of h20...never bring to full boil..



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bigcranky
05-07-2015, 10:52
The stove design makes a huge difference.

I did some testing last summer, trying to figure out how many canisters I would need for a Long Trail thru. Based on the Backpacking Light tests from a couple of years ago, I had been using a Coleman F1 Ultralight - the second most wind-resistant stove in their tests, and thus fairly fuel-efficient.

So I tested it on a couple of weekend training hikes, to see how much fuel I used in real world conditions. Boiling 2 cups of water averaged 15 grams of fuel per boil, all in very light breezes with the stove shielded with my pack, tent, etc.

That seemed like a lot of fuel, so I did some more research and found several UL hikers using Jetboils and getting 5 grams per 2 cup boil. So I found a Jetboil on a really good sale, and we used it for the whole hike. I was using 5-6g per boil, and water boiled more than twice as fast. It's harder to cook in the pot (smaller, and Jetboil recommends against it anyway), but we made do and it turned out to work pretty well.

This sounds like an ad for a Jetboil, but it's really a plug for fuel efficiency in canister stoves, and the Jetboil is just head and shoulders above the (many) other stoves I have used.

Some more info on this BPL thread (http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=48578).

Walkintom
05-07-2015, 10:59
Jetboil really does make a really efficient stove. The heat sinks help a lot to transfer energy to the pot.

If you're not willing to go to a Jet boil setup, another thing you might consider is buying a pot with a heat sink on it. GSI makes the Terra Weekend HE that sells for around $30 and is a pretty nice set.

bemental
05-07-2015, 11:04
+1 for the Jetboil, fast and efficient

q-tip
05-07-2015, 11:07
True, it is not just the stove. I did the testing on the Olicamp XTS pot and found a 40% reduced boil time!!!!! Jetboil pots also have heat fins.
http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/asset.php?fid=16780&uid=20935&d=1347658269
http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/asset.php?fid=16779&uid=20935&d=1347658244

saltysack
05-07-2015, 11:23
Thx..I dont really want to buy a new $100.00 heavier stove..I love my current set up under 6oz and much smaller in size....I realize it's not as efficient but for mainly weekend hikes works great and always want to start with a full canister anyway.....


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swisscross
05-07-2015, 11:46
Your looking at 6 boils of 2 cups of water per small canister.

RED-DOG
05-07-2015, 11:49
on a small MSR cannister i get 12 boils, 1 boil per day ( thats 12 days ) for my dinner, the rest of the time i eat none-cook.

saltysack
05-07-2015, 12:02
on a small MSR cannister i get 12 boils, 1 boil per day ( thats 12 days ) for my dinner, the rest of the time i eat none-cook.

What stove....


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Rocket Jones
05-07-2015, 12:16
Because of all the variables, the best answer you can get is to grab a couple of canisters and try it yourself.

PAHiker
05-07-2015, 12:21
Using a Coleman F1 and a Snow Peak 780 ml multi-compact aluminum pot with lid and 2 cups of water I get a year round average of 3 boils per oz. of fuel.

And, what Rocket Jones said.

bemental
05-07-2015, 14:44
From the JetBoil website (http://www.jetboil.com/Support/FAQ/How-much-water-does-one-canister-of-fuel-burn/)

A 100 gram canister of Jetpower fuel boils up to 10-12 liters of water. For trip planning, count on 10 liters per canister for some extra margin. If you're melting snow, assume 6 liters per canister. It never hurts to have an extra canister of fuel along, and it might make a big difference in comfort and safety. Please be advised, when in colder temperatures, it will take longer for your water to boil and thus your burner will use more fuel so adhere to the 6L rule.

MuddyWaters
05-07-2015, 20:04
http://whiteblaze.net/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=29097&d=1417908689
http://whiteblaze.net/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=29099&d=1417908761

My windscreen on my cannister stove weighs 0.35 oz, fits tight around the bottom of the pot.
This tight fitting windscreen here makes a HUGE difference.
With the flame on LOW, such that it takes about 7.5 min to boil, I use less than 0.2 oz fuel per 2cup boil. At higher rates I tested it approached 0.3 oz.
Measuring at home it was actually 0.18 oz.
On trail, I usually only boil 1.5-1.75 cups as well, not quite 2.

I used half of a 100 gm cannister on the JMT, 11 boils, based on floating it in sink when done, so Id say I could get 22 dinner boils from it.

Pot, stove, windscreen all weigh....3.1 oz

mattjv89
05-07-2015, 20:15
When I was making hot breakfast daily I got around 25 boils out of a small. Usually a 2-2.5 cup for dinner and two 1-1.5 cups in the morning for coffee and oatmeal. My setup is an Optimus vega, remote canister stove that allows a tightly wrapped windscreen, with a Primus Eta heat exchanger pot.

saltysack
05-07-2015, 20:19
http://whiteblaze.net/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=29097&d=1417908689
http://whiteblaze.net/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=29099&d=1417908761

My windscreen on my cannister stove weighs 0.35 oz, fits tight around the bottom of the pot.
This tight fitting windscreen here makes a HUGE difference.
With the flame on LOW, such that it takes about 7.5 min to boil, I use less than 0.2 oz fuel per 2cup boil. At higher rates I tested it approached 0.3 oz.
Measuring at home it was actually 0.18 oz.
On trail, I usually only boil 1.5-1.75 cups as well, not quite 2.

I used half of a 100 gm cannister on the JMT, 11 boils, based on floating it in sink when done, so Id say I could get 22 dinner boils from it.

Pot, stove, windscreen all weigh....3.1 oz

Link not working...pls try again


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MuddyWaters
05-07-2015, 20:23
Link not working...pls try again


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works for me. Might not if not logged in.

30698


30699

saltysack
05-07-2015, 20:44
What is it made from? Flashing?


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u.w.
05-07-2015, 21:11
Hey MuddyWaters,
That is the FM 116T stove correct?
I've got a 300T that I want to make a windscreen for - your post helps out a lot. Thank you

u.w.

MuddyWaters
05-07-2015, 21:23
Hey MuddyWaters,
That is the FM 116T stove correct?
I've got a 300T that I want to make a windscreen for - your post helps out a lot. Thank you

u.w.

Its a montauk gnat. This is easy because zelph flat bottom foster pot ( steel bottom), is smaller diameter than supports on the stove . there are other ways to support screen off of stove though. Its just flashing, rolls up and fits in pot against bottom and walls.

This was my first attempt to get dimensions right, made a nicer neater second one, but it wasnt quite as efficient, so i kept using this one.

Starchild
05-07-2015, 21:26
http://whiteblaze.net/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=29097&d=1417908689
http://whiteblaze.net/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=29099&d=1417908761

My windscreen on my cannister stove weighs 0.35 oz, fits tight around the bottom of the pot.
This tight fitting windscreen here makes a HUGE difference.
With the flame on LOW, such that it takes about 7.5 min to boil, I use less than 0.2 oz fuel per 2cup boil. At higher rates I tested it approached 0.3 oz.
Measuring at home it was actually 0.18 oz.
On trail, I usually only boil 1.5-1.75 cups as well, not quite 2.

I used half of a 100 gm cannister on the JMT, 11 boils, based on floating it in sink when done, so Id say I could get 22 dinner boils from it.

Pot, stove, windscreen all weigh....3.1 oz

Though on a hike where you would not need to carry more then one canister you are really carrying extra. If you can do your hike w/o the windscreen, not only will you be saving the weight of that item, but you will be reducing fuel weight as you will need more per boil w/o that wind screen.

This assumes you will start with a full canister.

saltysack
05-07-2015, 21:36
Though on a hike where you would not need to carry more then one canister you are really carrying extra. If you can do your hike w/o the windscreen, not only will you be saving the weight of that item, but you will be reducing fuel weight as you will need more per boil w/o that wind screen.

This assumes you will start with a full canister.

Never thought about it that way....Id rather not run out of fuel though. My concern was the 7 days from mtr to whitney....one small canister enough? Might throw a few ezbit tabs as fire starter/boil water back up.


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saltysack
05-07-2015, 21:38
Its a montauk gnat. This is easy because zelph flat bottom foster pot ( steel bottom), is smaller diameter than supports on the stove . there are other ways to support screen off of stove though. Its just flashing, rolls up and fits in pot against bottom and walls.

This was my first attempt to get dimensions right, made a nicer neater second one, but it wasnt quite as efficient, so i kept using this one.

Is this the roofing flashing u see rolled up at Home Depot? It seems heavy? If so where can u buy a small amount?


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MuddyWaters
05-07-2015, 21:41
Not going to worry about 2 oz of fuel

Just like i didnt worry about the 3.5-5 lbs of extra food i consistently carried on jmt because of faster pace than expected.

Or the wt of the 2 lb bearcan.

When you are light enough, or in good enough shape to make your target miles easily, .....well, it simply ceases to matter.

MuddyWaters
05-07-2015, 21:45
Is this the roofing flashing u see rolled up at Home Depot? It seems heavy? If so where can u buy a small amount?


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The small roll of the aluminum is about $12 i think these days, a small piece for a windscreen for solo UL pots isnt tjat heavy.

saltysack
05-07-2015, 21:45
Thx


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Maui Rhino
05-08-2015, 03:17
Are you planning to mail your fuel canisters in your resupply boxes, or buy whatever canisters are available at Tuolumne, Reds, and MTR? The various resupply places may not have 110's in stock. During my hike last year, all of them only had 220g canisters available for purchase. I started with a 220, and planned to buy another 110 at TM, which should easily take me to MTR, where I planned to buy another 110. I had a 220g that I stuck in my box to be delivered by the horsepacker at Woods Creek bridge (because I hand delivered the box, fuel mailing regulations were not an issue). I wanted some extra fuel for cooking trout, but was not sure just how much I'd need. Everyone only carried 220's, and I ended up carrying more fuel than I needed to. The 220 canister I bought at MTR lasted thru to Whitney, so I was carrying an extra 220 for a couple days after Woods Creek, until I ran into someone on the trail who was low on fuel and took my extra canister.

Plan on a 110 being good for 7 to 10 boils, or possibly a little more, and be prepared to have to buy a larger canister if that's what's available...

Lyle
05-08-2015, 09:04
While it's tough to judge, there are so many variables, I would not count on a small canister lasting for 7 days. Four days, yes, five maybe. Anything past that I would consider very unusual. As others have said, small canisters are not generally available for purchase at the resupply points in my limited experience with them.

Your mileage may be different. Keep in mind, if you treat/filter your water prior to use, often times there is no compelling reason to heat all water to a boil, just warming it up works for things like hot chocolate, instant coffee, instant oatmeal, and many home dehydrated meals (they just may need a bit more time in the cozy, you do use a cozy right?). Not heating to a full boil each time can definitely stretch your fuel. Also, being fastidious about where you set your stove up and protecting it from wind also makes a big difference.

Starchild
05-08-2015, 09:22
While it's tough to judge, there are so many variables, I would not count on a small canister lasting for 7 days. Four days, yes, five maybe. Anything past that I would consider very unusual. As others have said, small canisters are not generally available for purchase at the resupply points in my limited experience with them.

Your mileage may be different. Keep in mind, if you treat/filter your water prior to use, often times there is no compelling reason to heat all water to a boil, just warming it up works for things like hot chocolate, instant coffee, instant oatmeal, and many home dehydrated meals (they just may need a bit more time in the cozy, you do use a cozy right?). Not heating to a full boil each time can definitely stretch your fuel. Also, being fastidious about where you set your stove up and protecting it from wind also makes a big difference.

I can get 10L+ reliably boiled per small canister in a jetboil, so depending on hot much hot water the OP wants per day, 7 days would not be out of the question. And yes that's a very high efficiency stove/pot system which the OP is not using.

Instead of days out I usually look it as how much boiled water I need in total, then go from there. Depending on that number will be a better indicator of how much fuel would be needed.

saltysack
05-08-2015, 09:37
Are you planning to mail your fuel canisters in your resupply boxes, or buy whatever canisters are available at Tuolumne, Reds, and MTR? The various resupply places may not have 110's in stock. During my hike last year, all of them only had 220g canisters available for purchase. I started with a 220, and planned to buy another 110 at TM, which should easily take me to MTR, where I planned to buy another 110. I had a 220g that I stuck in my box to be delivered by the horsepacker at Woods Creek bridge (because I hand delivered the box, fuel mailing regulations were not an issue). I wanted some extra fuel for cooking trout, but was not sure just how much I'd need. Everyone only carried 220's, and I ended up carrying more fuel than I needed to. The 220 canister I bought at MTR lasted thru to Whitney, so I was carrying an extra 220 for a couple days after Woods Creek, until I ran into someone on the trail who was low on fuel and took my extra canister.

Plan on a 110 being good for 7 to 10 boils, or possibly a little more, and be prepared to have to buy a larger canister if that's what's available...

Thx
Couldn't get permits out of Yosemite so I'm flying in Wednesday to mammoth and starting Thursday sept 10 hiking jmt from Devils pp north to happy isles and catching yarts back to mammoth Sunday afternoon...hotel sun night then Monday morning Devils pp south on jmt to whitney. Only have 14-15 days to hike so need to stay light and do 15 mpd avg. think I'll buy a small canister after I fly in that should last till my resupply at mtr (10-12 boils)I'll buy one there to last till whitney.


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RED-DOG
05-08-2015, 09:48
What stove....


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the Pocket Rocket.

towerclimber727
04-18-2018, 03:43
What stove....


Sent from my iPhone using TapatalkWhat stove are you using and how many ounces in avg?

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saltysack
04-18-2018, 07:58
What stove are you using and how many ounces in avg?

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Wow dug up a old one...[emoji3]...Ive gone stoveless or an alchy stove over last few years...tired of the half empty canisters filling my closet and its lighter. I used the SP litemax for several years with a good wind screen and worked well....


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nsherry61
04-18-2018, 09:22
I use my BRS 3000T the most because it's entertainingly light and reasonably simple and fast.
In camp, I am generally jealous of the speed and ease with which my friends and/or family members boil water and cook/make coffee with one of my jet boil stoves.
I like my SnowPeak LiteMax a lot, but don't use it much since it is not as entertainingly light as the BRS and is not as elegantly fast and hassle free as a JetBoil. It is probably really one of the best stove options on the market because it is light, but not the lightest, simmers pretty well, and is versatile in pot usage. It's just not entertainingly extreme in any category. However, it is very well made.
I like my PocketRocket because it is such a community standard and is a solid, reliable stove.
I like my esbit tablets because they are the simplest stove in the world.
I like my Andrew Skurka style fancy feast stove because it is the simplest alcohol stove I've ever used (except tea candle tins, which require a separate pot support).
My favorite alcohol stove is the Fancy Feast because it has a built in pot stand, is hotter and more fuel efficient and more wind resistant than most other alcohol stoves out there, and is easier to build than most, especially if you use paper napkin material as wicks (which, by the way work shocking well).
And, after all that, I probably go stoveless about 1/2 the time because it is so simple and fast.

Now, if I'd get off these darn forums and go backpacking instead, life would be much better.

towerclimber727
04-18-2018, 15:08
Wow dug up a old one...[emoji3]...Ive gone stoveless or an alchy stove over last few years...tired of the half empty canisters filling my closet and its lighter. I used the SP litemax for several years with a good wind screen and worked well....


Sent from my iPhone using TapatalkOh wow lol... I didn't even see that, thanks for the reply

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BlackCloud
04-19-2018, 09:04
Anyone run the #s on an MSR Reactor?

cmoulder
04-19-2018, 10:59
Anyone run the #s on an MSR Reactor?
Yes. 9.6-9.8g per liter at full tilt, 42F water.

Hosh
04-19-2018, 12:42
Snow peak Giga, 50* h20 50* ambient, 10 grams per liter to small bubbles or 190* @ 5280’. Stove is most efficient at lower flame settings with 4.5” diameter pot, titanium. Data from isolated test in garage, no wind.

Two Tents
04-19-2018, 13:04
My Ti jetboil, with a full can, I'll get 20, 2 cup boils for sure in three season weather and not boiling at over 3000'. I have gotten 25 boils of 2 cups one time. I just figure for 20 now.

hikermiker
04-25-2018, 14:23
I have been keeping track for years and with various kinds of stoves and a 100g canister I have never gotten less than 12 boils.

ggreaves
04-25-2018, 15:02
Yes. 9.6-9.8g per liter at full tilt, 42F water.

... and it's the most wind resistant stove in the world.

cmoulder
04-25-2018, 16:52
... and it's the most wind resistant stove in the world.

Too bad it's so heavy and uni-functional, but there are situations (mountaineering, the Scottish moors) where it is likely the preferable tool. I personally couldn't imagine carrying it for a 3-season thru, but then some people carry very heavy WG setups.

ggreaves
04-25-2018, 17:24
Too bad it's so heavy and uni-functional, but there are situations (mountaineering, the Scottish moors) where it is likely the preferable tool. I personally couldn't imagine carrying it for a 3-season thru, but then some people carry very heavy WG setups.

It's a big burner, I'll give you that (one of the reasons its so fast). However, in size and weight (1L model) it's smaller and about an oz less than a 1L MSR Windburner. It weights about half an ounce more than a jetboil flash 1L and lots of people take jetboils on thrus (at least at the start - not sure how many finish).
Another area where these radiant heat burners (reactor and windburner) shine is in using every last bit of fuel in the canister because they're pressure regulated. I have an optimus crux that works really well when the canister is full, but after I've given up trying to boil with it, I can throw the same canister on my reactor and boil another litre easily.

If you're really concerned about how many boils you can get out of your canister, try a small wood stove (firebox nano) and don't carry fuel at all or worry whether you'll run out.

cmoulder
04-25-2018, 17:35
Hehehe, I've tried to love wood but just can't put up with the soot and smell, although I have no problem with Esbit... but that's definitely a trip deep into the land of YMMV.

I'll happily use it in a pinch, however, as I did this past winter when I made a boo-boo and packed a nearly empty canister and ran out of fuel quickly.

42574

BlackCloud
04-26-2018, 08:51
Yes. 9.6-9.8g per liter at full tilt, 42F water.

Fascinating. Thanks.