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magic_game03
06-04-2015, 07:35
Man, I've been out of, or low on, water more than a few times, but never a whole day. That particular predicament sounds awful. Headed to the Grand Canyon later this year and I'm already playing out the "no water" scenarios in my head.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2015/06/03/helicopter-crews-rescue-lost-arizona-hiker-who-was-near-death-after-running-out/


http://a57.foxnews.com/global.fncstatic.com/static/managed/img/fn2/feeds/Associated%20Press/2015/06/04/876/493/Hiker%20Rescued-1.jpg?ve=1&tl=1

rocketsocks
06-04-2015, 08:07
I've ran out of water before, but only for a few hours...it sucks. Being dehydrated is one thing, not drinking for three days and in those conditions in that environment can have long lasting irreversible damage to the major organs which can play out years later...not good.

Shutterbug
06-04-2015, 10:21
Man, I've been out of, or low on, water more than a few times, but never a whole day. That particular predicament sounds awful. Headed to the Grand Canyon later this year and I'm already playing out the "no water" scenarios in my head.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2015/06/03/helicopter-crews-rescue-lost-arizona-hiker-who-was-near-death-after-running-out/


http://a57.foxnews.com/global.fncstatic.com/static/managed/img/fn2/feeds/Associated%20Press/2015/06/04/876/493/Hiker%20Rescued-1.jpg?ve=1&tl=1


I was hiking in the same general area of Arizona (Aravaipa Canyon) the last few days. With temperatures of 104 it wasn't possible to stay adequately hydrated. I had access to plenty of water, but couldn't drink enough. I can't imagine trying to hike the AZ Trail this time of the year.

GoldenBear
06-04-2015, 13:34
He texted his wife Monday morning that he had no water or food. When she didn't hear from him again, she called 911. The Gila County Sheriff's Office coordinated a search.
The man told authorities he had experience doing long, solo hikes.
Twigg, who has helped in four rescues in the past several months in that area, said it was good that the man shared his hiking itinerary with his family.In other words, the hiker would clearly now be dead -- and his body wouldn't have been found for days if not weeks -- if he hadn't taken some simple precautions.

It's a good idea to do the following:
1) Have somebody at home who knows your route and itinerary.
2) Keep in contact with that person even if everything's going fine, but particularly if things are NOT going fine.
3) Discuss with that person what to do under certain circumstances. If you text, "I'm out of water" in the middle of the desert in June, then it may be time to call for a rescue.
4) Make certain that person has a list of phone numbers to call.
5) Tell the person that, if s/he's not certain who to call, then just dial 911.

Traveler
06-04-2015, 14:16
A good example of the value SPOT devices can bring to the party.

billnchristy
06-05-2015, 13:24
I don't have AZ hiking experience but I worked in the engine room on a carrier in the Navy in the gulf. Our space was about 125 under the vents, 140 and sometimes 150 in areas with poor ventilation. Sea water was 110 degrees so that was the "cold" water as sea water was the chiller for most purposes, luckily drinking fountains had a real chiller.

You can drink enough water, but it is obscene how much it is. I would drink 3-5 gallons in a 2 hour watch and still come out slightly dehydrated. I learned that when my sweat started tasting sweet it was too late and I was in danger.

I can't imagine being in those conditions for an entire day or longer, you guys are pretty tough, or stupid. ;)

Crazy Larry #1
06-05-2015, 14:24
Man, I've been out of, or low on, water more than a few times, but never a whole day. That particular predicament sounds awful. Headed to the Grand Canyon later this year and I'm already playing out the "no water" scenarios in my head.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2015/06/03/helicopter-crews-rescue-lost-arizona-hiker-who-was-near-death-after-running-out/


http://a57.foxnews.com/global.fncstatic.com/static/managed/img/fn2/feeds/Associated%20Press/2015/06/04/876/493/Hiker%20Rescued-1.jpg?ve=1&tl=1
Wow!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Shutterbug
06-05-2015, 15:33
...
I can't imagine being in those conditions for an entire day or longer, you guys are pretty tough, or stupid. ;)

Maybe both -- on Tuesday, I hiked 10 miles in "Hell Hole Canyon" in 104 degree temperatures. Fortunately, there was some shade provided by the canyon walls and I found a spring and several seeps. I have to admit that I was asking myself whether I was "tough" or "stupid." I decided that "adventure lover" was a better description.

To make that hike even more interesting, Hell Hole Canyon is a narrow canyon with vertical walls and I was following fresh bear tracks headed up the canyon. I was wondering what the bear would do if I caught up to him. There were only two ways for the bear to go -- farther into the canyon or right over me. Fortunately, the bear found some place to hide - probably in a cave that I didn't see.

billnchristy
06-05-2015, 21:23
Adventure lover wraps them both up in a nice neat package, good choice!

Wyoming
08-24-2015, 11:43
Just to further point out what it is like in parts of AZ.

In the last 2 weeks there have been 2 or 3 hiker deaths in the low country (think the Valley where Phoenix metro is located and the lower 1/2 to 1/3 of the state) and at least double that many rescues. All of them I think were day hikers. It is still hitting from 105-110 across half the state for daily highs. And most of those areas have no shade so add 10-15 degress to actual temp and then if you are in/on the rocks there is an oven effect added in. A quick search for AZ for the summer found at least 10 hiker deaths due to environmental conditions so far.

Tourists who do not know what they are getting into sometimes only last an hour or two before they need rescuing. Yesterday a family from England (I think) went on a day hike near Phoenix without enough water and all wearing black clothes. They were all in deep trouble but other hikers found them and helped them and called for a rescue. My daughter who lives in the Valley goes hiking all the time and she carries extra water just to give to other hikers who did not take enough. Lots of people do that. She has also ordered people she runs into to turn back.

Colter
08-24-2015, 16:14
I am a big believer in "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure." I don't put my efforts into planning for rescue but in planning to keep out of trouble in the first place. There is rarely a legitimate excuse, even in baking deserts, to get into serious trouble by running out of water.


Have enough water to start.
Stay fully hydrated. That in itself will give you a safety cushion.
Know where your next water source is.
Have a "Plan B" for water sources.
Don't push too hard.
Listen to your body.
Shade up during the most extreme heat.
Rely on your own good judgement, not a rescue plan, but it is wise to have someone aware of where you are and when you expect to get out, and possibly a device such as a SPOT, etc.

Mags
08-24-2015, 17:59
A good example of the value SPOT devices can bring to the party.

I think Colter's ideas would be more useful. There is really no reason to recreational backpack in 104F weather.... Towards the desert evening would be a more enjoyable time.

Wyoming
08-25-2015, 16:18
The experienced hikers seldom get in trouble, though it does happen like anywhere.

Almost all who die are tourists but one sees many locals day hiking who are not carrying enough water.

Interestingly enough on the local news last night they had a piece about this problem around the Valley (Phoenix). The report said they have an average of 200 hikers rescues in the Valley each year. There are about 200 miles of hiking trails there and they actually have a staff of rangers who monitor and try and take care of things. Signs all over the place telling folks to be careful and what to have with them. But it just does not work well as the tourists just have no idea what this kind of heat can do to you and how fast. They think one or two of the little bottles of water from the 7-11 are more than enough. Water consumption for most is at least 1 liter per hour when it is really hot and we all know how hard it is to get folks to carry 2-3 liters of water let alone 4. I go on day hikes where I live in the mountains at 5800-7000 ft and frequently carry 4 liters. But I usually start well before sunrise and am back by noon. I have been known to carry 6 on really long day hikes. And one needs food or other sources of electrolytes if they are going through that much water also.

burger
08-25-2015, 17:38
I read in a book about deserts that studies had shown that above a certain temperature (I want to say 110 but I can't recall the exact number), when hiking in full sun, it is impossible to stay in water balance. That means that even if you were drinking constantly, you would be losing more water through sweat and evaporation than you are taking in.

This is why, should you ever get lost in the desert, it's imperative to stay put under cover during the day and only move around at night. Unless you are certain that you can get to a water source, any exertion during the day is just going to make your water situation worse.