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mPalozzola01
06-23-2015, 10:16
Does anyone have experience with leki which seem to be the favorite vs the brand I have seen a few times that look really ergonomic and comfortable? Pros cons suggestions? Planning on a thru hike with em

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Rocket Jones
06-23-2015, 12:57
I use Pacer Poles. Incredibly comfortable. Love mine, and the only thing I would change would be to add flick-locks instead of the twist-lock mechanism.

mPalozzola01
06-23-2015, 13:37
I thought twist locks were the preferrable design

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illabelle
06-23-2015, 13:41
Haven't tried the pacers, but I love my Leki poles. :)
Flick-lock, cork handles.

Glogg
06-23-2015, 17:41
Love my pacerpoles too, the grips are really comfortable. They work well with my Tarptent Notch, and the only way to improve them would be flick-locks. The twist locks can slide a little under load if they arent tight enough. But Pacerpoles.com was great to me on my AT hike; they sent me replacement parts quickly and their service was excellent.

Lyle
06-23-2015, 18:32
+3 for PacerPoles, no comparison to traditional grips - beat them by a mile. Never had a problem with twist locks as long as you exercise them occasionally (once every two or three weeks when in use). Mine are over 9 years old now, and I still use them for every trip.

oldwetherman
06-23-2015, 19:14
I have Leki's, Black Diamond and Pacer poles. The Pacer poles took a while to get use to but they are the only ones I use now. My only issue with them is that they don't make them with cork handles. When the temperature gets into the upper 80's or higher and the humidity is high they are just unpleasant to grip.

highway
06-25-2015, 07:23
I have used Lekis. Switched to Pacer poles For me they were far superior. The Leki straps began to hurt my wrist. The ergonomic Pacer pole handles make the poles an extension of your arm and with just a slight hand motion can flip them around wherever you wish. Stumbling and falling is a thing of the past. But, more than anything they save my weak left knee that I once blew out on the downhills of the Smoky Mtns. With Pacerpoles I can push down with my hands and transfer a huge amount of the downhill force to my arms and shoulders so I build those muscles up too, on a long distance hike, rather than have them atrophy while just the legs get stronger. I would not hike without them. The screw down locking mechanism seems far stronger, too, and I have never had mine slip in the last 4 years of using them on various Caminos across Spain and Portugal. Leki Vs Pacerpoles? Pacerpoles win-and by a wide margin. I could not hike without them!

mPalozzola01
06-26-2015, 09:35
Well I guess that kinda decides it ... not one vote for lekis yet

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Lyle
06-26-2015, 09:55
To be fair, #4 was a vote for Leki, but they hadn't tried PacerPoles.

I've been using PacerPoles for about 10 years now, and for the life of me cannot figure out why they haven't caught on more here in the US. Over those 10 years, I've only found one person who stated they didn't like them, and she refused to try them out due to hand contamination fears. Guess I understand that fear, but sometimes folks take it too far. :)

The ONLY downside I find with them is having to buy direct from the manufacturer, but they are very helpful and fast in their response to replacement parts, etc. I've only needed to contact them twice in the 10 years, once to replace a carbide tip that apparently got sucked off in deep mud, and the second time to order a replacement for a pole section I bent slightly by carelessly stepping on it. It was still functional, but wouldn't collapse all the way due to the bend.

Highly recommend them, in case you hadn't figured that out. Yes, I have used traditional poles as well.

highway
06-26-2015, 09:57
My observation is that who use lekis just kind of drag them along, planting pole tip with each step and serve little useful purpose other than save one from an occasional stumble. Pacerpoles, with their ergonomic hand grip allow you to walk and push away on each step, helping you to move further, faster and is an immense help on the uphills, transferring part of each step in the uphill motion to arms and shoulders. Until you try it you want believe it.

Traveler
06-26-2015, 10:04
To be fair, #4 was a vote for Leki, but they hadn't tried PacerPoles.

I've been using PacerPoles for about 10 years now, and for the life of me cannot figure out why they haven't caught on more here in the US. Over those 10 years, I've only found one person who stated they didn't like them, and she refused to try them out due to hand contamination fears. Guess I understand that fear, but sometimes folks take it too far. :)

The ONLY downside I find with them is having to buy direct from the manufacturer, but they are very helpful and fast in their response to replacement parts, etc. I've only needed to contact them twice in the 10 years, once to replace a carbide tip that apparently got sucked off in deep mud, and the second time to order a replacement for a pole section I bent slightly by carelessly stepping on it. It was still functional, but wouldn't collapse all the way due to the bend.

Highly recommend them, in case you hadn't figured that out. Yes, I have used traditional poles as well.

Perhaps if they were retailed in the US they would get more exposure.

Lyle
06-26-2015, 10:13
Perhaps if they were retailed in the US they would get more exposure.

I bought mine through Brian Frankle, founder and former owner of ULA Equipment. He was the US distributor for a number of years, and he personally recommended them.

I guess the manufacturer finds it more economic to only sell direct, but most cottage manufacturers do that and still manage to gain popularity via online recommendations. I'm sure not being present at hiking events contributes also, but most hikers never attend events either, so I don't believe that is a major factor. I've just been puzzled for years that more folks don't use them.

Traveler
06-27-2015, 06:09
I think its more reality of marketing. Limited exposure will limit customers. I am not sure why they don't hook up with REI or even a regional retailer like EMS to increase their North American market share. Perhaps the manufacturer can only support making just so many units per day/week/month, which would cause the manufacturer more harm than good to ramp up retailing exposure.

Convenience may play a role too. Sending money to a foreign manufacturer for gear or clothing one hasn't been able to try out or on, then dealing with shipping issues if the product is not satisfactory may be a limiting factor for a lot of folks. Bottom line remains, without more exposure to the market, the market won't know they are around.

highway
06-27-2015, 07:58
I think its more reality of marketing. ...
Bottom line remains, without more exposure to the market, the market won't know they are around.

I am not convinced that Pacer Pole even wants a larger share of the market. But, in my estimation, the big loser here are us hikers. Most hikers are just not aware that such a superior product exists. I have used four different pole manufacturers over the years before stumbling upon Pacer Poles and they work so well that I'd prefer to buy theirs rather than have to use another-even the much touted Lekis-for free. Its the ergonomic hand grip which converts those poles to become an extension of my arms. When I blew my left and part of the right knees out some years ago, I was using a single pole. I thought my hiking days had come to an end. But, some months later, with the pain about gone I began to explore the 'net for other's solutions and discovered these poles which could take large amount of weight off each step on the downhill and help propel me forward on the uphills, all the while helping to build up my upper body. I bought them. They have been a life saver for my hiking. I can even use them like crutches crossing streams too wide to jump when I don't want to get my socks wet. I plant both in the stream's middle then swing my body through the poles to the other side with nary a slippage on them and I weigh 200 pounds. Try that with leki poles!

Look at the videos and you will see what I mean:

Pacer Pole (http://www.pacerpole.com/)

Traveler
06-27-2015, 09:43
I've no doubt that the poles work well for you, but as you said, you had to look around before you "stumbled on them". The issue wasn't that these poles weren't good, but that more people didn't know of them. You may be right that the manufacturer can only support production at the level they are at currently, which is fine and may be the reason they are not readily available in the US as other makers are.

mPalozzola01
06-28-2015, 16:17
Some companies prefer no middlemen ... I am a hammock hanger, I use a Clark Jungle Hammock.. far superior to many other brands but no stores carry em... why? Because Clark feels they would rather work directly with the customer.

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ChuckT
01-14-2016, 20:32
I have all 3. Lekis - aluminum, flip locks, and cork. Black Diamond carbons with hard rubber grips, and Pacer poles.
Here in muggy Florida the Pacer Poles anatomical grips get sweaty Now! But I've been using them because the hand position seems better to me.
Had my drothers they'd have cork grips. Oh well.

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poolskaterx
08-22-2016, 19:57
I really like my Leki cork lite poles, the grip is what I really like about them. Cork feels great in almost all conditions and the top "egg shape" handle is very comfortable to me for a second hand position. Customer service for me from Leki has been top notch and I was treated as a valuable customer and not a problem when I spoke with customer service.

Odd Man Out
08-23-2016, 16:04
I have BD Alpine Ergo Cork and Fizan Compact. Like both for different reasons. Have considered PP, but it looks like you use them without straps. With straps, I don't really grip the pole so it would seem to me that the ergonomic grip wouldn't be that much of an advantage. Would like to try them some time, but without a local retailer, it would be difficult.

Drapac
01-10-2017, 19:18
I have been looking at trekking poles all day and a common theme I see is cork tends to be favored over rubber (provided it is quality and doesn't fall apart). It sound/looks like Pacer poles do not offer a cork grip though.

Has anyone tried any kind of wrap, around the handles o solve the hot sweaty/slippery issue? I am thinking vet wrap or maybe even tennis racket wrap (or whatever it would be called).

nsherry61
01-10-2017, 20:40
I have been looking at trekking poles all day and a common theme I see is cork tends to be favored over rubber (provided it is quality and doesn't fall apart). It sound/looks like Pacer poles do not offer a cork grip though. . .
I don't prefer cork. I prefer the foam grips as do many people.

I do prefer cork to rubber, but I strongly prefer foam to cork for comfort, moisture management and durability.

As for Pacer Poles not having the grip you want, then go buy ones with the grip you want. Pacer poles have a loyal following, but they are far from the only pole out there well worth owning.

Lyle
01-10-2017, 23:14
Regarding the PacerPole grips. I've never found them to be excessively sweaty. Due to the design, you really only need to hold them by two fingers, and only press your palm into them when propelling forward or bracing yourself for a down hill. Because you can grip them so lightly, the hands do not sweat, at least mine don't.

It would be very difficult to apply any type of wrap to a PacerPole grip, they are so ergonomically designed, it would be near impossible to get it to lay flat. Perhaps they could be dipped into some product, but I don't know what, nor would I bother.

Odd Man Out
01-10-2017, 23:54
I am intrigued by pacer polse, but have a question for Pacer Pole fans

I understand the grips are different (and chiral). But do straps work the same way? It looks as they don't really serve any purpose when hiking. When I'm using my traditional poles, I don't really grab the handles that much. The straps really do most of the work. Wondering if you miss the straps. Seems like this might be a big thing for me to get used to.

Lyle
01-11-2017, 01:22
Straps are entirely unnecessary. They do include some cord loops that go around your wrists if you wish. These allow you to use your hands while the pole just dangles for taking pictures or arranging a hat or whatnot.

I've used straps in the past, but do not miss them a bit with the PacerPoles. The grips are soooo comfortable and the palm/heel of your hand is a much stronger contact point to place the stress of transferring the power than to have it pulling up on the wrist.

Offshore
01-11-2017, 09:07
I am not convinced that Pacer Pole even wants a larger share of the market.

That makes no sense. Why wouldn't they want a larger share of the market? It seems they need a better distributor - although I imagine that the specialty outdoor retailers must be aware of the product and concluded either that their customer interest just wasn't there or the product could not be produced in adequate quantities. I still can't get past the silly "Its not just a stick - its a Walking System" marketing-speak on their web site, but its the twist lock design that makes them a non-starter for me.

Traveler
01-11-2017, 09:26
That makes no sense. Why wouldn't they want a larger share of the market? It seems they need a better distributor - although I imagine that the specialty outdoor retailers must be aware of the product and concluded either that their customer interest just wasn't there or the product could not be produced in adequate quantities. I still can't get past the silly "Its not just a stick - its a Walking System" marketing-speak on their web site, but its the twist lock design that makes them a non-starter for me.

Resistance to increasing marketshare is not uncommon in specialized manufacturing. There can be a lot of reasons for that resistance, for example it could be they got into a bind with a retailer supply commitment and were sued or are not able to meet the demands of a third party seller in other countries. There may be some brand cache when requiring overseas purchasing/shipping to acquire the product or other marketing nuance I am missing as well.

It may be even more simple in that the manufacturer sees little value in expanding marketshare through third party retailers and prefers the predictable annual volume that requires a set number of employees and known level of resource funding to meet. While it does require consumers wanting their product to work a bit for it, it does simplify the business model.

Bottom line is, if you want their product you have to go across the pond to get it, which for a lot of folks could be a deterrent that the manufacturer may count on to a degree.

Offshore
01-11-2017, 10:51
Resistance to increasing marketshare is not uncommon in specialized manufacturing. There can be a lot of reasons for that resistance, for example it could be they got into a bind with a retailer supply commitment and were sued or are not able to meet the demands of a third party seller in other countries. There may be some brand cache when requiring overseas purchasing/shipping to acquire the product or other marketing nuance I am missing as well.

It may be even more simple in that the manufacturer sees little value in expanding marketshare through third party retailers and prefers the predictable annual volume that requires a set number of employees and known level of resource funding to meet. While it does require consumers wanting their product to work a bit for it, it does simplify the business model.

Bottom line is, if you want their product you have to go across the pond to get it, which for a lot of folks could be a deterrent that the manufacturer may count on to a degree.

Being afraid of being too successful is pretty far-fetched - are they in business to make money or to enhance the hiking experience? Why not do both - make money by enhancing the hiking experience? It's a hypothetical, but tell me with a straight face that if Black Diamond thought this could be a breakthrough bestseller and offered PP a couple of million to buy the company or just to license the IP, they'd say no. Not likely, but if they are purists, they'll remain a well-loved but niche product known and used by very few people. And if that's what they want, that's absolutely their right - but I doubt it. I think you have a great point with the whole cachet idea, though. After all, they are not trekking poles, but a walking system, as the web site says.

SkeeterPee
01-11-2017, 12:36
Would they work as tent poles? it seems like that would be a problem for people who uses the trekking poles and tent poles.

rafe
01-11-2017, 13:59
My observation is that who use lekis just kind of drag them along, planting pole tip with each step and serve little useful purpose other than save one from an occasional stumble. Pacerpoles, with their ergonomic hand grip allow you to walk and push away on each step, helping you to move further, faster and is an immense help on the uphills, transferring part of each step in the uphill motion to arms and shoulders. Until you try it you want believe it.

Who ever said that feet need to be in perfect sync with pole plants?

Lyle
01-11-2017, 22:12
Would they work as tent poles? it seems like that would be a problem for people who uses the trekking poles and tent poles.

Been using mine as my tent/tarp poles for over a decade - not a problem.

roys
01-12-2017, 10:18
And today's news is: pacer poles now come with the lever locking system ( http://sectionhiker.com/).

I purchased my first set of pacer poles last year to replace my black diamond poles and couldn't be happier. Pacer poles encourage, almost mandate, proper back alignment when walking. No more swinging your arms forward and therefore rounding your back to plant your poles. A very simple wrist movement and your poles are ready to plant. With pacer poles, which are very simple to use properly, your head, neck, and upper torso are almost always centered over your hips reducing, perhaps eliminating, pressure on your lower back.
If I was young I could go back to walking with my upper torso ahead of my hips, my lower back could, and did, take the strain. But I'm 65 and its not gonna happen. But even if I was young I would still want them.

Pacer poles can be used to set up some, perhaps not all, tents. Check with your tent manufacture or check the tent reviews on sectionhiker.com. sectionhiker.com is a great web site. Very honest and knowledgeable reviews, IMO.
Some people take the small elastic strap off the pacer pole handles. I keep them on just to pick up the pole when one falls to the ground.
In short pacer poles are great they have no peer in my opinion.

T.S.Kobzol
01-12-2017, 10:42
Great to see so many use Pacer Poles. I had no idea. I stumbled upon them about a year ago somewhere on the internet and bought a pair to try them out.

Last winter I injured my right knee on a hike and it has been bothering me for a while before it healed. But nothing it 100%. I still feel the knee at some angles and at some activities.

So I tried the Pacer Poles. I'm not entirely convinced they helped with the healing to my knee but I can say they provided additional morale boost. :-)

Grips : At the beginning the grips felt a bit weird but I got used to them after two hikes and have to say I do like the poles. Especially enjoyed the grips around winter temperatures as they seem to run warmer than traditional grips.

Usage: Glad to see they work fine with tarps. I don't recall using them yet (I carry a pair of thin carbon poles specifically for tarps) so I'm glad to see they work fine.

One usage I am not sure about and have to say I haven't even tried is backcountry skiing. Has anyone tried that?

AllDownhillFromHere
01-12-2017, 23:09
Leki Super Makalu - try them, and you'll never go back to anything else. Cork handles at the right angle & adjustable shock/springs.

Kerosene
01-13-2017, 14:12
I've always been intrigued by PacerPoles, but have used Leki's since 2002 on my section hikes. I now have the Super Makalu's with cork handles which I prefer over the black foam handles on my prior Leki poles as my hands don't seem to sweat as much.

Obiwan
01-13-2017, 15:51
Die hard Leki fan


May have to check out PP since they appear to be pretty popular!

AllDownhillFromHere
01-15-2017, 22:03
Another cool thing about Lekis - I needed a replacement spreader, I went to REI and EMS, they gave me a bunch of runaround and wrong parts. I called Leki, immediately got right through to a person, who immediately knew the size of the spreaders I needed off the top of her head.

lucky luke
11-27-2018, 04:23
i used lekiīs for more than 35 years. same pair! cimbed denali and aconcagua with them and they hiked 2/3 of the at with me. nothing came even close all the years.

last year i have tried the pacerpoles and after getting used to them i never used the lekiīs again. pacerpoles rock!

its different than hiking with wristloops and i had to adjust my ways of handling the poles. i love the fact, that the poles make you walk more upright, giving you more air and views. i dont sweat on the handles, i dont miss the wristloops a bit. with the neopren"overmits" you dont need gloves down to -5įcelsius (or lower if you are used to it). the quality is superb, service ecellent with same day/evening response.

hope its my last pair of hiking poles. i am sure my lekis could have been that pair as well if i had not run into the pacerpoles.

Traillium
11-27-2018, 23:47
hope its my last pair of hiking poles. i am sure my lekis could have been that pair as well if i had not run into the pacerpoles.

I was given a used pair of Pacer Poles and both my wife and I love them! I agree with Lucky Lukeís comments.


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Deadeye
11-28-2018, 01:15
I sorta go hybrid - I have the cane-style Lekis that I can use like a Pacer Pole, and I get the Leki quality, service and guarantee.

https://www.leki.com/us/trekking/poles/2662/wanderfreund-speedlock/?c=708

clay pot
11-28-2018, 09:52
Own both. Leki owned first and began AT with them. They are a good pole. But went with Pacer poles for one simple reason: pain. I am 78 and still out there. I could not hold on to the Leki and not have pain in my thumbs. Totally an aging thing. If not hiking, I am fine. Then, after awhile with the pacer poles, the different ways to use them becomes a muscle memory thing and going back to standard hand hold felt weird. Pacer service is great. And twist lock is fine if you separate the pole, wash crap off, and air dry between trips. If "out there" for any length of time, I just separate and wash as often as I can. Also, I go with an Heximid solo tent when not hanging. So I have the set up pole with me. And it fits.

GolfHiker
01-09-2019, 13:26
Iíve owned my PP since 2003, and Iím on my second set. I really love them. Honestly, itís been so long I canít recall what made me select them, but then Iíve always been a bit different in my gear selections. Iíve always gotten a lot of questions from fellow hikers, simply because of the pistol grips.

I always laugh at the Pacer Pole web site, as they go way overboard to explain how their design is beneficial in making your hike easier, complete with instructions on striding, etc., etc. I never bought in to any of that, I just like how they feel, and after all these years, itís just normal to me.

That said, I have had good service from the owners when needed. Iím glad they are doing well.

Finally, my biggest question is, why have none of the other big boys adopted anything remotely close to the PP design?