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ierinys
07-06-2015, 00:23
Hey all,

So I was helping my Ma with some grocery shopping (I am her sponsor, if she goes in for bread and milk she'll leave with two months worth of food) at ALDI supermarket when I stumbled across this little gem:

http://offers.kd2.org/en/us/aldi/pMbg/

I've weighed the thing and it is about 3.1 pounds, "65 liters", aluminium frame, padded belt, load lifters, all the bells and whistles. I realize that an el-cheapo pack like this "adventuridge" will likely die before even crossing into North Carolina from Georgia, but if loaded properly, would this make a good pack to train with?

Opinions anyone?

MuddyWaters
07-06-2015, 01:15
Dont know anything about it. But as someone once said:

"A well-priced p.o.s, is still a p.o.s."

Caveat emptor.

rocketsocks
07-06-2015, 02:59
Sure why not, just bring a spool on good thread...something to do in the evenings. You might get lucky and not have to repair at all.

Traveler
07-06-2015, 05:58
My experience with this kind of stuff is you spend more time messing with it than using it in any meaningful way. Since this won't be used for anything trail related really, why not use a pack and get on with training?

Starchild
07-06-2015, 06:52
1 - Would be fun to strip that down, see how light it can get. I find such things hard to do with a new pack due t the usual cost of them, but for $30 I think it would be far easier to try modifications.

2 - Does it match another well known pack? The design looks somewhat like some name brand packs. If you have found a exact match this is possibly from the same manufacturer so could be high quality, just pushed out a different door.

Bronk
07-06-2015, 09:02
For $30 I'd give it a try if you don't already have a pack.

ierinys
07-06-2015, 09:14
to Starchild: As far as I can tell it doesn't really resemble any pack that I'm familiar with, but if you see anything let me know.

to Bronk: That is the problem, I don't have a pack yet so I'm really just planning on using this pack for training. It fits me, its comfortable, but as MuddyWaters said above a well priced POS is still a POS. If I can mod the [email protected]#$'n hell out of it, it might work but then again, we'll see.

Singto
07-06-2015, 09:54
Not sure if this is big enough (48L @ 3lbs, 4 ozs for $32 or less elsewhere) for your needs but there's many good customer reviews on this bag as well as on YouTube. It will probably be useful long after the "training" is finished. Different colors.

http://www.amazon.com/Everest-Hiking-Pack-Red-Size/dp/B0019GAOO6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1436189646&sr=8-1&keywords=everest+pack

Good serviceable hiking equipment doesn't have to be expensive, just pay attention to the reviews if available and inspect equipment for materials and workmanship, if possible. I care far more about materials and workmanship than who's name is on it.

Good luck.

q-tip
07-06-2015, 11:39
I use a high quality day pack loaded with 20-35 lbs. The size of a training pack I don't see as important, its ability to handle weight (and have a hydration port) are important to me. Filling a 65 L pack is a lot of volume for training.

ierinys
07-07-2015, 00:54
Update: Also found that is has area for a water bladder and built in pack cover.
To q-tip: thank you.
In all reality it was a spur of the moment buy really. The way I figured is that I can buy what gear I'll be using for my thru-hike and use the $29 pack to practice with and figure out my pack configuration. Outside of having the light stuff on the bottom and heavy stuff higher up and close to my body, any recommendations?

Feral Bill
07-07-2015, 01:01
You may well get your money back in savings on your next pack, from having a better idea of what you want and need. Maybe take a look at used name brand packs.

Singto
07-07-2015, 07:22
There's some good points here but I respectfully disagree with using a day pack unless there is a comparable hip belt/adjustment system on it or it's the type your going to hike with. Practicing weight distribution and best carry position dictates practicing with getting the hip belt and load lifters etc. located and adjusted correctly. If it were only a body conditioning exercise then adding weight to a day pack and going for it would be fine in my opinion. But you sound like you're trying to do a complete training and fitting exercise/experiment for which I don't think a day pack is appropriate.

Good luck with the pack you bought, it's likely that it will do what you need it to.

Offshore
07-07-2015, 07:30
Hey all,

So I was helping my Ma with some grocery shopping (I am her sponsor, if she goes in for bread and milk she'll leave with two months worth of food) at ALDI supermarket when I stumbled across this little gem:

http://offers.kd2.org/en/us/aldi/pMbg/

I've weighed the thing and it is about 3.1 pounds, "65 liters", aluminium frame, padded belt, load lifters, all the bells and whistles. I realize that an el-cheapo pack like this "adventuridge" will likely die before even crossing into North Carolina from Georgia, but if loaded properly, would this make a good pack to train with?

Opinions anyone?

If you're really going to do this, why waste the $30 on a pack you have no intention of using? Packs fit differently and carry differently and training involves more than just dead weight. Ideally, you'd practice with the gear that you expect to take with you. What you're carrying really dictates the choice of a pack. I'd begin to build the equipment list and start to buy it. Once I had what I was taking (or at least identified the gear), I'd spend the time learning about packs to make a short list of ones that you think might meet your needs. Next, go to a good outfitter to be fit and try them out (with weight bags or equipment itself). Once you've found what you think meets your needs, buy it and train with it. The training will be more realistic and it will also afford a pretty comprehensive "test drive" of the pack you actually intend to use. This will help to avoid surprises once you get out there.

Cobble
07-18-2015, 11:15
Wow.. All the negativity. $30 is a steal. I used an external frame the whole trail and ended up tying it together with nylon cord as different pieces broke, BUT it got me to Katahdin or more accurately I got it to Katahdin.

there will always be naysayers. Just do you own thing and when you're 200 miles down the trail and the pack still works enjoy laughing it up. The nature of adventure is the risk of failure. So have fun!

PS Let us know how it goes!