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PushingDaisies
01-20-2003, 20:55
What size backpack would you use or have you used for a thru hike or long distance hike?

Wander Yonder
01-20-2003, 22:54
I just got the Women's Kelty Satori 4500 and love it. It was designed for thru hikers whose carry weight varies temendously between supply stops. It's the hiker's verison of the Ghost.

The Satori is very comfortable -- and modular. I did not check a size because it is adjustable from 3500 - 4500. With all the elements, it weighs 5 lbs. 2 oz. You can remove the two large side pockets and get rid of 18 oz. You can remove other stays, levitators (help with carrying heavy loads), frame sheet, etc. and get it down to around 2 pounds if you want to. It also has a large mesh pocket on the back that is detachable and can be used as a lightweight daypack. I plan to leave it attached and carry wet things in it.

I had injured my back a few weeks back trying to carry too much weight in a Go-Lite Trek--and it also cut into my hips, so I replaced it with the Satori. I think I made a great choice.

Peaks
01-21-2003, 09:55
Originally posted by PushingDaisies
What size backpack would you use or have you used for a thru hike or long distance hike?

You should know the answer, as you did part of the trail last year and saw the variety of packs being used.

Myself, 4300 CI external frame. Others used something smaller.

SGT Rock
01-21-2003, 10:03
My answer is 5000ci and up, but that is because my Gearskin could go up that high, but it never gets up to that capacity except in training hikes where I get up to about 50 pounds. This pack is so cool because it never gets slack down to about 2500ci. And it only weighs 22.5 ounces.

RagingHampster
01-21-2003, 12:34
Mine is 0 cubic inches. I have an external frame and just strap all my bags to it. Currently I'm using walmart drybags, but I'm going to make some ripstop sil-nylon stuff-sacks pretty soon (when my fabric comes in the mail). It's easier to get to stuff, there is nothing at the "bottom" of your pack, and since most people use stuffsacks inside their own bag, why not just get rid of the outter bag? With waterproofing built in due to the sil-nylon, no pack cover is needed either. Pack frame right now weighs 2lbs with padded shoulder straps and taught mesh which holds the stuff-sacks off your back and prevents nasty back sweat. I think I can get it down another 4-8oz if I make a one off aluminum tube frame to fit my height only (which would eliminate all the sliding tubes and locking pins).

Squirrel
01-21-2003, 12:53
I have three packs that I use for the AT. All three are made by Kelty.

1) Kelty Redwing 2900
2) Kelty Redwing 2400
3) Kelty (unknown style and size). It is similar to the Redwing, but smaller (approx 1800), very simple and light.

I do ultralight backpacking, so these sizes are fine for me. The third Kelty is a real challenge to use (which I like) so I keep things very simple and rough it.

I love the Redwing design because it is like a backpack you used in school that the whole front zips open. This is much easier than a top loader for me (I have an old one). I bought the 2900 at REI for $100 and found that it was a little too large and everything would settle to the bottom. I found the 2400 at Sam's for $25!!! I found it to be an excellent size for me.

I rarely carry many extra clothes though. I rarely wear many clothes too. I learned how to do this in Russia. They do not use air conditioning where I went, so everyone just acclimated to the weather. They never complained and were always comfortable. I adopted this practice and I wear silkweight capilene in the winter with maybe a light jacket if it gets below 30* for too long.

-Squirrel

smokymtnsteve
01-21-2003, 13:05
I use a kelty red wing too..
and i have an old synergy works for heavier winter stuff ..but you would have had to be around in the 70's to have one of these!!

Squirrel
01-21-2003, 13:13
Steve,

My mother was in college in the 70's...does that count?

I was born in nineteen hundred eighty-one. These kids today don't know how easy they have it. I had to hike uphill both ways, and I loved it.

-Squirrel

PushingDaisies
01-21-2003, 17:12
Originally posted by Peaks
You should know the answer, as you did part of the trail last year and saw the variety of packs being used.



Yes, I did see the variety of packs being used, but just because I see them (some for only seconds) doesn't mean that I will instantly know the specs on them. :)

This is one question that many beginners ask, so I thought it would be nice if people who have done some hiking could give some perspective on what they use and why.

Footslogger
01-21-2003, 17:27
I hiked the Gregory Shasta in 2001. It served me well, in fact I still have it, but at 5050 cu in I was tempted to put too much stuff in it.
I downsized to a Gregory Shasta at 4350 cu in and that's what I'm doing my thru with this year. It's the "right" size for me and my gear but I wish is was a tad lighter.

Streamweaver
01-21-2003, 20:01
I also have a Kelty Redwing 2900 and I love it!! Ive beat the crap out of it(I am rough on packs!!)since I bought it in 96 for 70 bucks and its still going strong!! Its a bit faded and I wish I could find something to darken The green nylon and help protect it .I just wish they made one in a bit larger torso size ,its just a little to short for me. It still amazes me how much gear I can easily fit in this pack!!! Streamweaver

Jumpstart
01-21-2003, 20:52
I used the Osprey Aether 60 on my hike, and my husband used the Mountainsmith Ghost. Both carried sub-30 pound loads very well, were comfortable and had little- to- no maintnenance. They both weigh under three pounds empty, and the Osprey was so comfortable I stated feeling uncomfortable without it...my turtle-shell :)

Waterbuffalo
01-21-2003, 21:27
I use a Gregory Shasta 1998 and it's great

Mike Drinkuth
03-14-2003, 19:37
I carry a big Dana Design, over 5500 cu.
I actually find it easier to pull things out of my pack if I have room to spare. I know exactly what it should look like for however many days I will be out (how fat or how wrinkly). On weekend trips it looks like an old Basset Hound on my back. I guess I could buy a smaller pack for shorter trips but, like jumpstart, mine feels like a turtle shell to me. I'm attached!

Hey Squirrel,
What say you teach me some of that russian cold weather technique, hua? C'mon...be a pal!

Redbeard
03-14-2003, 21:25
Too big when I'm navigating blown down tree's, never big enough when I'm packing it.

Papa Bear
03-14-2003, 21:43
I've used a Kelty "Flight" at around 3 lbs. It's rated at 4500 cu. in. with all the pockets on, but I took them all off (except the top which you need) so I guess it's a little under 4000 cu. in..

Big enough and light to boot.

Pb

(Haven't "thrued" but have gone on a number of 2 week treks. )

smokymtnsteve
03-14-2003, 22:57
.....

Presto
03-17-2003, 14:17
Mountainsmith Ghost 3100 cubic inches.

Good size for a reasonable amout of gear.

Tigger'97
03-17-2003, 16:14
At 2900ci my new Gregory G-pack works beautifully! The pack only carries around 25lbs, so I've managed to get my base weight down to 15lbs. I'll let you guys know how this pack works out on test hikes in the Whites this summer.

Prior to this, my pack of choice was the Dana Bridger. At 3100ci it was a dream come true for comfort and fit. It's just a bit too heavy now for my needs.

Happy Hiking!! :D

Kerosene
03-17-2003, 18:35
Presto, with regard to the Ghost, where do you store your sleeping bag? There's no bottom compartment, the main cavity looks too small, and it doesn't look like there's really room to lash it to the top or bottom.

Also, have you used this pack outside of the warm summar months when you have to pack a wider range of clothing? If so, does the 3100 cubic inch size accommodate everything reasonably well?

Presto
03-18-2003, 11:15
Kerosene-

I fit my sleeping bag in the pack-I usually used the bungees that are built into the pack to strap my sleeping pad on the outside. I'm not saying the bag fit in the pack easily in cooler months (March)- but it did fit. I also had a cheap, down 20-degree sleeping bag with poor fill rating, otherwise it would have fit easier. You certainly have to get your pack volume and weight down in order to use this pack but it is constructed well and I would recommend it for anyone who can fit their stuff in it and keep their pack weight with food and water down around 30lb or less. It served me well for an AT thru-hike. If I were to do serious mountaineering this pack would not work well but I think it is sufficient for me anywhere on the AT.

Here is a list of the gear my wife and I STARTED with. I wouldn't recommend this much junk, but it just demonstrates what the pack can hold. Note that my wife used a pack of similar volume (3500 ci). http://www.trailhiker.net/gear.htm

Jumpstart
03-18-2003, 18:59
Hi there Kerosene,

My husband also carried the Ghost from mid-VA onward, and everything fit very well. Our gear list is at bakerat.homeip.net so you can check out what he carried, but for the most part he had plenty of room....

Kerosene
03-20-2003, 14:32
Thanks, Presto and Jumpstart. Most of my section hikes tend to be in the Fall, so gear volume tends to be an issue, even if total weight would come in at 30 pounds with 5 days of food and 2+ liters of water. I love the way my Dana Designs Terraplane fits me, but the net weight savings with a Ghost is pretty tempting.

Saluki Dave
11-10-2003, 16:05
Gregory Pallisade large (hey, I'm a big guy) 5150 c.i. I've never gotten into the extension collar so there's no telling how obscenely large it could be.

micromega
12-04-2003, 20:00
I'm considering a Gregory Palisade myself. I currently use a Kelty Redwing 2900 which works great for warm weather hiking or ultralight cold hiking for me. But the bulk of my hiking currently is in cold weather and I need something bigger and beefier, to handle both the added volume and weight.

So, a few questions for Saluki Dave and other Gregory owners, comments from anybody are welcome...

How well does the Palisade handle being used for anything from day hikes to multi-week trips? Small loads or large?

Whats the heaviest you pack with it? I haul a lot of gear from time to time and don't want a pack that'll crap out on me. My Kelty gets shaky after passing the mid thirties, anything above forty pounds is pushing the limit, at least in regards to comfort.

Does it's unloaded weight ever give you trouble? It comes in at twice the weight of some ultralight packs. Worth it?

I'm also considering some ultralight packs, Gregory Makalu Pro, Osprey Aether, etc... I have concerns about those packs in respect to load hauling capability though. Can they handle a big and/or heavy load? Mostly I worry about their load hauling capability and smaller volume. The volume is great for warm weather, but for cold, I'm just not so sure.

So, how feasible is a Gregory Palisade, for overall use up to and including thru hiking?

Rain Man
12-04-2003, 22:32
I'm considering a Gregory Palisade myself. I currently use a Kelty Redwing 2900 which works great for warm weather hiking or ultralight cold hiking for me. But the bulk of my hiking currently is in cold weather and I need something bigger and beefier, to handle both the added volume and weight.

I have a Kelty Redwing 2900 also and a Gregory Reality. I had a Palisade, but took it back to REI and swapped it for a Reality before I ever took it on a hike. For me, the Palisade is/was just too big and too heavy. The Reality forces me to keep my loads smailler and lighter (and much more reasonable) than if I had a big Palisade and could stuff it full.

But... I'm not a winter backpacker so far.

Last weekend when Frank Looper and I visited backpacker shops in Greenville, SC, I had two different, experienced sales folks (one at each shop) (one male, one female), one who had thru-hiked the AT, advise me to keep my Reality, when I asked them about the ultralight packs they had for sale. That made me feel good about the choice I had made!

Saluki Dave
12-05-2003, 10:20
I can say I'm pretty happy overall with my Palisade. It's a 2001 model, about a pound heavier than the current model, and a large (5150 c.i.) to boot. Judging by current prices, it looks like there'll be a new model for 2004, probably lighter, like the 2002 upgrade.

I'm not the easiest guy in the world to fit with a pack (6'3", 290 lb), but this one comes pretty close. Carries big loads well, although I'm usually in the 35 - 40 pound range including food and 2 liters of water. I carry nothing externally except my bear rope, water bottles and snacks in the mesh pocket.

I haven't ever used the extension collar, although I could see how it would come in handy for light, bulky items (winter clothing etc). Overall, I'd rate it 8/10 for my needs, but then, I'm a tough grader. I'm sure any of the mid-size Gregory packs would be fine for you. Best of luck and see you along the way.

Nightwalker
12-06-2003, 00:52
Last weekend when Frank Looper and I visited backpacker shops in Greenville, SC, I had two different, experienced sales folks (one at each shop) (one male, one female), one who had thru-hiked the AT, advise me to keep my Reality, when I asked them about the ultralight packs they had for sale. That made me feel good about the choice I had made!

At one of those shops they had a Gregory Stinger, on sale for $125. I kept going back to look at it until, I'm guessing, my sweet wife felt sorry for me. SO, 3150 CI, down from a way-too-big 5500 CI JanSport that I had kind of gotten past, if you know what I mean

Frank

peter_pan
12-06-2003, 10:36
hiked 800 miles from mar to nov 2003 with a home-made 1900 cu single compartment pack with three mesh pockets of 700 cu. currently testing a 1200 cu in pack w two mesh pockets of approx 500 cu in that wieghts 13 oz and is totally water proof.

Footslogger
12-06-2003, 20:01
I started with the Gregory Shasta (same bag size as the Pallisades) and found it to be way too large, even for my warmer/bulkier clothing and gear. This year I started with the Gregory Reality and was happy at first. However at Pearisburg I switched over to my light weight gear/clothing and had a lot of excess capacity and raw pack weight. I bought a Granite Gear "Vapor Trail" and hiked it all the way from Pearisburg to Katahdin. At 2600 cu in I found it to me more than adequate.

MedicineMan
12-07-2003, 00:06
I float around a bit always testing new gear but mainly am in a Mithril I when doing 2-3 day hikes with a top pocket mod, for slacking its a Camelbak HAWG in the Spring/Summer, and a Camelbak Peakbagger for late Fall/Winter. I have used many packs and have a 30 year collection ranging from whole series of Golites, an Arcteryx, a Kelty, a Jansport and others.
The Mithril I is is the 4400ci range and easily carries all I need even for very very cold (10 and below) weather. I dont know if I really like the white color but I dont dislike it either, just think that from a distance it might look like a large whitetailed deers tail.

Jaybird
01-21-2004, 08:54
What size backpack would you use or have you used for a thru hike or long distance hike?


does size really matter? hehehehehehe! ;)


i hike with the REI Morningstar 75.
4700 ci
retail: $140.
on sale/closeout: $110.


From REI ad:

Shaped and padded shoulder straps and hipbelt offer carrying comfort
Load lifter, hipbelt and sternum straps help balance your pack while dual aluminum stays distribute the weight evenly
Two vertical and four horizontal compression straps stabilize the load
Organize your gear in the top-loading main compartment, floating top pocket, two side pockets, one front pocket and an interior pocket with key keeper
Ice axe loop, daisy chains and dual dog-bone-style accessory patches for lashing on additional gear
Dual water bottle pockets allow access to liquids without removing pack
Made of lightweight yet tough 420-denier ripstop nylon pack cloth with KodraŽ nylon bottom for durability


see ya'll UP the trail in 2004!

walkon
02-26-2004, 12:45
i prefer the golite speed pack. ultralight, built for speed. it will handle 30lbs but if you are carrying that much weight...
walkon

azchipka
02-26-2004, 13:15
So i cant help but wonder those of you using packs in the 2000 - low 3000 range are you also storing things on the outside of the pack, or have you managed to cut down the items you bring with you to fit in that amount of space.

I use a 4,900 pack but have about another 500 worth of space on around the belt area. The thing is everything fits inside my pack.

A-Train
02-26-2004, 16:15
I used a mountainsmith ghost this year on the trail for about half my hike (1000 miles). Its a 3100 cu inch pack. Rarely had issues fitting everything. I do keep my ridgerest on the outside using the cords to lash it on. Keep 2 1 liter water bottles in the outside pocket and generally store a few odds and ends in the pockets like aquamira and maybe a dip cup. Everything I carry is fairly light and compact and compressed down.

jojo0425
02-26-2004, 17:23
Guess I have a big pack...5000 cu in. my first long trek (4 days) I carried 45 lbs, yes I know, YIKES.

Last summer, down to 40 lbs for 6 days, better...

This summer I hope to carry about 30 lbs for 6 days, I'm learning how to hike with a limited budget... AND I'll have a partner this time, so we'll split up stuff like the tent, stove, filter, pots...YIPPIE, I got a trail mule (just kidding Storm)

Jaybird
02-27-2004, 06:41
Guess I have a big pack...5000 cu in. my first long trek (4 days) I carried 45 lbs, yes I know, YIKES.

Last summer, down to 40 lbs for 6 days, better...

This summer I hope to carry about 30 lbs for 6 days, I'm learning how to hike with a limited budget... AND I'll have a partner this time, so we'll split up stuff like the tent, stove, filter, pots...YIPPIE, I got a trail mule (just kidding Storm)


2002 My first section hike on the A.T. i carried approx 45lbs in my 3500ci pack.

2003 A.T. Section hike new pack: 4500ci (approx) carried approx 35lbs

2004 A.T. section hike (coming in May) same 4500ci pack will be carrying less than 30lbs

all weights include food & water....everything!




see yall UP the trail!

Shoe Leather Express
02-29-2004, 08:04
I just bought the Granite Gear Vapor Trail, so you can add me to the 3000 to 4000ci club. I previously voted 3,000 and below (Kelty Pueblo 2900 ci). Also have a Jansport Rockies, so I guess I pretty much have all of the bases covered. :D

DeoreDX
02-29-2004, 09:34
I will use a 3300ci 26oz Equinox Kathadin for my bulky winter loads and 3000ci 34oz Osprey Aether for my summer loads.

Footslogger
02-29-2004, 13:18
I just bought the Granite Gear Vapor Trail, so you can add me to the 3000 to 4000ci club. I previously voted 3,000 and below (Kelty Pueblo 2900 ci). Also have a Jansport Rockies, so I guess I pretty much have all of the bases covered. :D
I think you're gonna like that pack. If you can keep your overall weight around 24 - 26 lbs the pack carries very well and the hip belt is robust enough to keep the majority of the weight off your shoulders. As you approach 30 lbs though you will notice the load on your shoulders. I bought mine in Pearisburg, VA on my thru-hike last year and carried it to Katahdin. I was carrying a Gregory Reality up to that point but when I dumped my cold weather gear and clothes I didn't need all that space.

One suggestion though ...get a plastic trash compactor bag (WalMart) and line your pack with it. I bought a silnylon pack cover and still had water (we had a lot of rain in 2003) get to the pack. The Vapor Trail carries a lot more like a rucksack than a internal frame pack (eg it drapes down off your shoulders in the back) and a pack cover doesn't protect the entire top of the pack. But with the trash compactor bag your stuff won't get wet even if the pack does. Another great thing about the Vapor Trail is that if it does get wet it dries quickly.

Happy Trails ...

Kozmic Zian
02-29-2004, 13:46
Yea....Backpack. I use a Kelty 'Treckker' external frame. Not the lightest, but very comfortable. Weights 4.5lbs empty, although I took all the bells and whistles off and dropped the weight to 4 lbs. I like the way I can get everything inside, very tight and together. Also, you can pull down these externals so they are right up against your back and there's no side to side motion. For the money, a very serviceable LDH backback.
I'm looking at a Go-lite Race. I like about 3,000CI and about 22# with F&W. KZ@

sgtjinx
08-09-2004, 14:06
I use a Dana Design K2 Longbed. I hate to carry light and freeze at night. Been there and done that crap! I like the space in it and I can find everything real easily. :cool:

Ramble~On
08-09-2004, 14:40
An oversized pillow case worked just fine for Grandma Gatewood.

I've come to realize that I collect packs and switch up whenever the mood hits me. For some reason I have an Arcteryx Bora 95 and on days that I am feeling strong I can put all of my stuff into it and still have room to carry one other hiker and all of their stuff inside the bag.
Actually, the Bora 95 is nice to have on long winter trips.

For the AT......I haven't found any reason to go above 3500 cubic inches

Alligator
08-09-2004, 14:49
Me too Spritwind, I have a Bora 95 that I bought right before I started downsizing and replacing aging gear. It only comes out in the winter. But, I suspect I will be using it more as my family grows. Otherwise, I use an Aether 60 (large) for the other three seasons.

smokymtnsteve
08-09-2004, 14:53
an old rebuilt Kelty redwing

I_think_I_can
08-23-2004, 20:58
Steve,

My mother was in college in the 70's...does that count?

I was born in nineteen hundred eighty-one. These kids today don't know how easy they have it. I had to hike uphill both ways, and I loved it.

-Squirrel
Yup, in snow up to my armpits year round...:banana

Erin

Jeremy
08-24-2004, 01:58
On my first AT section hike, I used a three year old ALPS Night Hawk pack, that was around 5500 cubic inches. This was way too big. The pack also weighed six and a half pounds. On my second AT section hike, I used a Gregory Z-Pack. This was not bad, my base pack weight was around twenty pounds, and with food and water, it didn't get heavier than thirty five pounds. The only complaint with the pack is the comfort. If I had the pack around thirty pounds, my shoulders would hurt, even thogh it fit properly. The hipbelt wasn't thick enogh to carry the weight well, I kept getting pains. I currently use the Z-Pack for ultralight trips in the spring, summer, and fall, but I am only comfortable when the total pack weight is no more than twenty five pounds. For my thru-hike, I am planning on using an arcteryx Bora 80. I don't care that it is a heavy pack, you can barely even feel it on your back. I have had between forty and fifty pounds inside it to test the load carrying capabilities, and the pack felt like it only had around thirty pounds in it. I am willing to add a few pounds, if it adds greatly to my comfort and well being. If my pack doesn't hurt, and doesn't shift around or cause pain anywehre, then I can hike farther and longer.:D

jags
05-13-2005, 22:31
" I use a 4,900 pack but have about another 500 worth of space on around the belt area. The thing is everything fits inside my pack."

A good point that seems to be ignored by many.
I see photos of AT hikers with more stuff hanging on the outside of their packs, than is inside; all of which contributes to imbalance and tires the hiker out faster. I often wonder how many bomb out of the AT due to poorly packed packs, that tire them out unecessarily.

Comfort is another factor that many seem to ignore, giving it up for lightness, which can be tiring in its own way if the comfort is not there.

Mine's a Lowe Expedition 70, which I may trade for a 4 1/2 lb Contour Hyperlight - but no lighter will I go.

Jags

Crazy Larry #1
05-14-2005, 15:14
What size backpack would you use or have you used for a thru hike or long distance hike?
I have a Dana Design Lonbbed, the last they made I believe. I think it is 6600cu's? wanderer

AbeHikes
01-25-2006, 12:11
Kelty Satori 4700. A pretty decently-sized pack with more room than I need for an overnight or during the summer, but that's what the attached cinch straps are for, right? Tighten down the lower third of the pack before you start packing and you have something more appropriate. If something happens on the trip and you need more room, just un-cinch it.

Hammock Hanger
01-25-2006, 12:34
My Sherpani is 2800 cu inches, I love this pack. However, if I do the PCT i may need a bit more gear and will probably move up to a 3200 cu inch pack. Sue

Wolf - 23000
01-25-2006, 23:03
What are people doing weight lifting? :) Keep it under 2000 cb/in.

Just kidding but honestly some people really do carry to much.

Wolf

joedannajr
10-16-2006, 08:12
I use a slightly larger pack than most only because I like some comforts. I enjoy a tent instead of a tarp especially when the bugs swarm, an extra set of clothing to change into when it has been raining. And extra food at the end of a long hard day.
Joe

Gaiter
10-16-2006, 09:37
I use a Gregory Deva 60. I've got a small (3700) Its very comfortable, I started with 40lbs on my hike, still very comfortable. Also met another girl with the same pack carring 50lbs, she said that she has had as much as 70lbs in it at one time and it was still fine.

Jaybird
10-16-2006, 09:50
What size backpack would you use or have you used for a thru hike or long distance hike?\



PD:


i've used the REI Morningstar 75 pack (4950ci) for the past 5 seasons....(4lbs 7oz) but, have begun to rethink because of weight issues....heading towards purchasing a GRANITE GEAR VAPOR TRAIL (LARGE) 3900ci (2lbs) for my next long distance hiking adventure (A.T.section-hike April-May 2007).:D

jlb2012
10-16-2006, 12:36
I have no idea what is the "size" of my backpack - its a Gearskin

Jerry Kahil
10-22-2006, 21:42
I have a Kelty Redwing 2650 that I plan to use on my first section hike in the spring. I am a little worried that it won't be big enough, but my brother will be with me carrying a larger Regatta Land Trekka 45 (he bought it in the U.K.). If we put common use items in his pack, I think we should be ok and then we can alternate carrying packs during the hike. Any thoughts?

Outlaw
10-22-2006, 22:36
I have a Kelty Redwing 2650 that I plan to use on my first section hike in the spring. I am a little worried that it won't be big enough, but my brother will be with me carrying a larger Regatta Land Trekka 45 (he bought it in the U.K.). If we put common use items in his pack, I think we should be ok and then we can alternate carrying packs during the hike. Any thoughts?
Welcome to WB from a fellow Albanyite!:welcome
You didn't say how many days you and your brother would be out for. Is your trip for a weekend, a week, two weeks, etc.? I think this could play a crucial roll in deciding the amount of space you will need. also, will you be going during early spring where you will need additional warm clothes? Will you be able to resupply with food along the trail? What about shelter-- tarp, tent, hammocks?

Best bet is to gather everything you are planning on taking, add room for the amount of food you will hauling with you and water and see if you can manage to get it all in your two existing packs. As far as switching packs with your brother, is he the same size/shape as you? Will the packs be comfortable for you to switch off with? EMS in Stuyvesent Plaza rents backpacks at a reasonable rate if your packs don't work out as planned.

VictoriaM
10-23-2006, 16:28
I'm thru hiking next year with a 2750 Gregory Tega. Space is definitely tight, but doable. I love my pack.

Dazzy001
08-12-2008, 22:01
I use a striped down 8000 cubic inch, i hate straping crap to the outside of my pack. i got the weight down from 88oz to 60oz striping it down... i could get it lighter but dont want and relability issues.

Egads
08-12-2008, 22:19
Wolf - 23000, I agree with you on this one. My new 3 seasons weekender pack is 32 liters. That's 1,952 CI for those of you in Rio Linden:D And, everything fits inside the pack.

Peter Pan, I have used a 20 liter (1,220 CI) for an overnighter this summer. It really is too small for a shelter, insulation, food & water.

I'd probably carry my ULA Catalyst 75 liter (4,600 CI) if I was going on a long hike.

Wolf - 23000
08-12-2008, 23:45
Wolf - 23000, I agree with you on this one. My new 3 seasons weekender pack is 32 liters. That's 1,952 CI for those of you in Rio Linden:D And, everything fits inside the pack.

Peter Pan, I have used a 20 liter (1,220 CI) for an overnighter this summer. It really is too small for a shelter, insulation, food & water.

I'd probably carry my ULA Catalyst 75 liter (4,600 CI) if I was going on a long hike.

Egads

A 1,220 c/i pack is plenty of room to hike long distance with for three season backpacking. There is so much light weight backpacking equipment out there, doing so is fairly easy. My REI Flash UL is 1,050 c/i and works fine with 5 days food and equipment.

Wolf

Egads
08-13-2008, 07:11
Egads

A 1,220 c/i pack is plenty of room to hike long distance with for three season backpacking. There is so much light weight backpacking equipment out there, doing so is fairly easy.

I guess it depends on where you hike. The water bladder fills half the volume, the down quilt the other half. The tarp, and food fit in the pockets.

I am not willing to hike without water. There are too many water sources drying up this summer.

sasquatch2014
08-13-2008, 07:54
I have a Kelty Soar its 5200 CI. I like it becasue everything fits nicley inside with out having to mash it in so tight that all food items look like the same blob of crap. This pack comes from the company at about 4lb 2 oz so its not too bad for the size of it. Someday I may go down in size and get alighter pack but that will depend on a number of factors not the least of which will be winter heating costs for the house.:(

superman
08-13-2008, 08:21
Started the AT with an external frame pack that I'd gotten in the mail just before I left home. I had stuff lashed all over it. It was a mess. I bought an Osprey 3500 CI. That pack worked great for the rest of the AT. When I finished the AT Osprey rebuilt the pack at no charge. My gear has changed so I don't use that much space any more, except in the fall when I carry some warmer stuff.

X-LinkedHiker
08-13-2008, 10:03
I use the Gregory plaisades 80 Liter. Worked out to be around 5100CI I believe.

mister krabs
08-13-2008, 15:56
Following the "buy the pack last" idea, I'm still using a stripped down Gregory Reality with the top flap and many straps removed. Down from 5lbs to 4. It's a Large torso size, so 4650c.i. / 75L. Since I started coming here to learn about lightening up, every time I go out it seems a bit bigger. :banana This last time, I had it down to 25lbs before water, now it's really looking like overkill, but it sure does ride nice.

Stir Fry
08-13-2008, 17:20
Following the "buy the pack last" idea, I'm still using a stripped down Gregory Reality with the top flap and many straps removed. Down from 5lbs to 4. It's a Large torso size, so 4650c.i. / 75L. Since I started coming here to learn about lightening up, every time I go out it seems a bit bigger. :banana This last time, I had it down to 25lbs before water, now it's really looking like overkill, but it sure does ride nice.

Get a lighter pack and you will lose that nice ride. I have 5 packs and the Jansport Kalmath 85 half full is the most comfortable to me, and everything fits inside.

The Solemates
08-13-2008, 18:10
i used a 3700 cubic inch pack bc we started Feb 1 and needed winter gear and food, but towards the end it ended up being only about half full

if i did the trail again, i would either start may and use a ~2500 cu in pack or start again Feb 1 or before and use a similar sized pack as before.

The Solemates
08-13-2008, 18:13
I use a striped down 8000 cubic inch, i hate straping crap to the outside of my pack. i got the weight down from 88oz to 60oz striping it down... i could get it lighter but dont want and relability issues.

what color stripes are they?

darkage
09-10-2008, 19:04
Currently using a jansport Big bear 82, 5000ci ... 3 lbs 9 ounces ... nice and comfy ...

trouthunter
09-11-2008, 19:09
4200 cu. in. Vaude
4900 cu. in. Kelty Coyote

trouthunter
09-11-2008, 19:09
4200 cu. in. Vaude
4900 cu. in. Kelty Coyote

summitnh
04-04-2009, 18:58
I used my gregory jade at 50 Liters 3250 cu".

Kathfishes
04-04-2009, 19:12
Here's a question. Does anyone know who made the "Marlboro" pack years ago? Internal frame, detatchable daypack, plenty of outside mesh pockets... don't know the size but It has plenty of room, is comfortable for me, and was sorta free! Friends saved those "miles" for me!
Kathfishes

BitBucket
04-04-2009, 19:34
Gregory Z65 - 3966 cu.in....also have an Osprey Atmos 65 I just bought...

Both are right in there at 3-3/4 lbs and can carry 35-40 lbs relatively well.

The Osprey packs down better than the Gregory, but I think the Z65 feels slightly better than the Atmos 65...

Jaybird
04-05-2009, 08:07
I just returned from picking up hiking pal, "JIGSAW" in Franklin,NC (he was hiking with "WOOP WOOP" from Springer Mtn) & from what he tells me the hiker crowd that he has observed needs to do some HOMEWORK.
Most carrying 40-50 lb packs.....YIKES.

Guess they arent WB members!

As fer me...I am continuing to use my GRANITE GEAR "LATITUDE VAPOR" 3800ci 2lbs 8oz
total weight (w/ 7 days of food & water= 31lbs)

See ya'll out there May 1-14 Harpers Ferry,WV-Swatara Gap, PA w/ "Model-T"

Engine
04-06-2009, 13:10
Me - 10 years ago: Gregory Wind River 8,000 cu/in.
Now it's a Granite Gear Vapor Trail / 3,900 cu/in. fully expanded. I will likely never use much over 3,300 or so though.

My wife - 10 years ago: Gregory Palisades 5,000+ cu/in.
Now it's a TNF Terra 30 / 1,850 cu/in.

RockDoc
05-07-2009, 20:40
Six Moons Starlite 4200 cu in/67 l
no stays, no hip belt used

Phoenixdadeadhead
05-07-2009, 21:08
I have a 75+10 for my longer hikes and my weekender is around 2500 cubic inches. Truth be told though I don't think I need 85 liters (about 5500 ci) for my long hikes, maybe one 2 week hike this summer I will try my 2500 instead. I also have a 5000 that I used for years that I let my nephew use, as well as a heavier than all h311 MOLLIE pack that I actually used for a 2 week hike 1 time OMG never again.
Don't trust us to tell you what pack you should take. My advice would be get your gear together, put it all in a laundry basket and go to the Store. You might feel stupid and get some strange looks, but you will find your perfectly sized pack.

Phoenixdadeadhead
05-07-2009, 21:10
Or you can do what I have done and buy pack after pack lol

Egads
05-07-2009, 22:06
Why limit yourself to one back pack in the closet?

Carry the one that holds the gear & food you need for the hike you are going on.

I carry a 15 liter up to a 75 liter depending on season, trail, & duration.

Tinker
05-08-2009, 00:55
2700 cu. in. Golite Dawn 14 oz. No frame (I use a section of ccf pad to line it and stuff everything inside). Hiked 100 Mile Wilderness with it last year (approx 34 lbs. at start with food bag sticking out about 8" above opening). Carried fine. Discontinued (probably because many have been convinced that a frame (and a bunch of pockets and compartments) is a necessity.

sloopjonboswell
05-08-2009, 02:24
6,000 lets you cram in a case of beer. you can do it.

STICK
06-27-2009, 14:02
I currently have a Kelty Red Cloud 5600. I will be using this on some week long trips. It is my first bag, which is why its so big. I plan on purchasing a GG Nimbus Meridian in the future and this is the bag I plan on using for my thru hike (not sure when it will be though, maybe 2011). My gf has the GG nimbus Meridian Ki. It is 3900 ci.

johnnybgood
06-27-2009, 14:11
My Osprey 44 (2600 cubic inch) is good for a week long hike , which is all I can do anyway.

Grinder
06-27-2009, 14:20
I have a home-made gearskin. It figures out to be about 2700 cu in, as adjusted. oval 16x8 and 24 inch high

It can go much bigger or smaller

Dogwood
06-27-2009, 17:58
Pack size depends on the hike. Factors that influence my pack size can include: how often I'm resupplying, trail, time of year, water availability, etc. Currently, for most 3 season hikes on one of the main North/South trails in the U.S., I'll use a ULA conduit.

Dogwood
06-27-2009, 18:00
Forgot to add. This is for thru-hiking purposes not day hikes or shorter(less than 1 wk. trips).

Jaybird
06-28-2009, 08:24
Your pack ONLY needs to BIG ENUFF to carry 7 days (approx) of food/water PLUS your essentials.

my current backpack: the GRANITE GEAR Latitiude Vapor (http://www.granitegear.com/products/backpacks/ultralight/latitudevapor.html) rated @ 3800ci
& weighs 2lbs 10oz.

I stuffed 29 lbs worth of gear (& food & water) in it this year!

alalskaman
07-05-2009, 16:56
Personally what I would like to see, and perhaps will try to make one of these days is a big, but light pack. I have lots of "light, fluffy" stuff...Just because you go light shouldn't mean that you waste a lot of time stuffing things into ridiculously small stuffsacks to try to fit everything into a 2500 ci pack. A very lightly stuffed down bag will loft up a lot quicker at bedtime - and will probably last longer. A 15 pound load isn't going to weigh less just because you can cram it into a tiny pack. Heard somebody say they'd "blown the seams out" of a VaporTrail. Which IMO is a pretty rugged pack...but if they were trying to get a full camp and maybe a bear canister in, well it could happen.

IMO the whole tiny pack thing is a sort of way of disciplining you to leave nonessentials at home. I believe Dick Kelty started that in the late 50s, or so a Kelty staffer told me once. But, if you can discipline yourself to go light, then why not have some extra cubic inches?

El Toro '94
07-07-2009, 20:56
I have a Kelty Super Tioga-the guy I bought it fro says it's 4900 ci. I pack semi, but not ultralight, and it has more than enuf room for a weeklong winter trip. Right now I'm looking at a wt. of 30-34 pounds for a week long winter trip, including food and fuel, depending on which sleeping bag I take, 28 pounds or so in summer. I could go lighter with a smaller pack, but I like the comfort and the way it carries the load on my hips and not my shoulders. Plus it was reasonably cheap, thus freeing up resources to spen on a downmat instead of a thermarest.

JoshStover
08-22-2009, 21:31
I use the Osprey Aether 60(large) and it is rated for 3800 cu in.. I absolutely love this pack. It has PLENTY of room for all of my gear and then some. It is such a comfortable pack as well. I have not had the IsoForm CM hipbelt custom molded to me yet but I will for sure before I leave for my Thru Hike in February. I am not the most Ultralight hiker but I normally carry around 32 to 35 lbs. When I start out at Springer I figure it will be right around 35-37 lbs but once I get farther north I plan to get closer to 28 lbs. I could get right around 22 but there are some things that I will have a really hard time with sending them home. It's easy to say how light you can get your pack while talking online but when you are out there and already sent everything you dont need home, it get a little bit harder. I dont really carry a heavy pack at all but I plan to try to lighten my load just a little bit more...

Anyone else on here use the Osprey Aether?:confused: Let me know how you like it. It is my first internal frame and I only have about 150 miles on it so Im sure someone on here has more miles than I and can let me know what they think of it...

I just want to thank everyone for this WONDERFUL site!!! I have only been on here for a short time but I have already learned soo much! I plan to try to stay with this site even during my thru-hike. Is it decently easy to get internet access in the trail towns? Im thinking about bringing the iPhone with me so that wont be a problem if I do bring it... Well I'm rambling. I just love hiking more than anything and I can talk about it all day and night(if you can't tell):jump. Once again, Thank you soo much for WhiteBlaze.net! My new favorite website...:banana

chiefduffy
08-23-2009, 04:53
Personally what I would like to see, and perhaps will try to make one of these days is a big, but light pack. I have lots of "light, fluffy" stuff...Just because you go light shouldn't mean that you waste a lot of time stuffing things into ridiculously small stuffsacks to try to fit everything into a 2500 ci pack. A very lightly stuffed down bag will loft up a lot quicker at bedtime - and will probably last longer. A 15 pound load isn't going to weigh less just because you can cram it into a tiny pack. Heard somebody say they'd "blown the seams out" of a VaporTrail. Which IMO is a pretty rugged pack...but if they were trying to get a full camp and maybe a bear canister in, well it could happen.

IMO the whole tiny pack thing is a sort of way of disciplining you to leave nonessentials at home. I believe Dick Kelty started that in the late 50s, or so a Kelty staffer told me once. But, if you can discipline yourself to go light, then why not have some extra cubic inches?


I have come to the same conclusion. My pack this year was 23 lbs with 5 days food. It's a ULA Catalyst, big by some standards, and can carry lots more weight. But I like it packed loosely, especially my quilt. Looked kinda huge in the pics, tho.

Big Dawg
08-23-2009, 07:37
I use the Osprey Aether 60(large) and it is rated for 3800 cu in.. I absolutely love this pack.


I just want to thank everyone for this WONDERFUL site!!! I have only been on here for a short time but I have already learned soo much!

:welcome to WB!! Best o luck on your thru hike!

I use the Osprey Atmos 65 & love it. I've heard great things about the Aether. Starting off from Springer at 35#'s... you'll be on the lower end of starting weight compared to other thru's. Have Fun!!! :D

JoshStover
08-23-2009, 20:29
Thank you soo much! This truly is a great site!

I hope to try and get my pack under the 35lbs by the time I leave. We will just have to wait and see. I just purchased a really nice 100 lb postal scale and have been really focusing on how much EVERYTHING I put in my pack weighs and what I can do to make it lighter...

Big Dawg
08-23-2009, 21:50
I just purchased a really nice 100 lb postal scale and have been really focusing on how much EVERYTHING I put in my pack weighs and what I can do to make it lighter...

Yea, my "kit" took a plunge down in weight when I bought a digital kitchen scale and weighed EVERYTHING, and created an excel spreadsheet to list all items that passed the "test". I was amazed at all the misc crap that I never used that added up big time.

lazy river road
09-23-2009, 18:51
has any one used the Osprey Argon 70 im considering buying one either that or the ULA catalyst...its for my end to end of the LT starting in mid june

skinewmexico
09-23-2009, 19:24
Personally what I would like to see, and perhaps will try to make one of these days is a big, but light pack.

GoLite Pinnacle

mark schofield
09-25-2009, 07:56
I just did a 2 week hike on the LT with an Osprey Exos 58 (medium, 3500 cu in). Started with 7 days food and 3 liters water (very dry). About 30 lbs total weight. It was fine for me.

faarside
09-25-2009, 10:21
Lowe Alpine Netherworld ND70.

Connie
09-30-2009, 14:39
I have been traipsing around the mountains of the CDT-North with a REI Lookout pack and only the stove kit on the outside of the pack. I pack my XS Cascade Designs sleeping pad inside rolled up tight. The main compartment has my sleep system.

I like a 40-liter pack.

I like this REI Lookout, featuring rather ingenious compartmentalization and all the adjustments (load lifters, change the position of the chest straps, and a wide comfy waistband) of a pack designed for much heavier loads. I can achieve "fit" and I found out I do like having everything-in-it's-own-place.

If I could find someone to make a 20-degree F quilt for me of 900-fill down, using MLD DWR Momentum cloth in black and a "brushed" material (doesn't feel as cold as smooth material) inside in grey, with a "storm collar" on the inside, that would fit on a JRB sleeping pad to be used, by me, as an additional pad along with my present sleeping pad for colder conditions, or the Cumulous "Mysterious Traveller" overall shape (I am 5'6") with 900-fill down only in the top and sides like a quilt wrap, I think I would have my "ideal" quilt. It would pack down to a small (volume) for "summer" use in the mountains here.

Troop 73 on YouTube shows adding water, after the boil, to the cat-style alcohol stove to get a simmer. If true, I would have more options for food preparation, if using a cat-style alcohol stove.

I wonder if that would work with any open-style alcohol stove?

I think, if I had these two items "worked out" I would use the REI Lookout for long hikes and otherwise general mountain trekking in the high mountains of the CDT-North and the North Cascades, Washington State, as well, both, my favorites for high mountain ranges here in the U.S.

The "new" (or older) sage green on grey GG Vapor Trail I saw at REI-Tualatin also has that molded foam back. I would purchase the pack to have more useable volume inside, if I do not find my "ideal" sleeping quilt.