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Boo-Yah
07-28-2015, 00:00
OK, been dreaming of hiking at least a week on AT next spring or summer. So I thought I better start getting ready for it with some smaller hikes and gear purchases.

I am 53 years old, fair shape I guess (I lift, run, ride bike periodically), little overweight, 6'4" 255, and not very flexible - I might add.
I also have foot issues, very narrow feet and high arches and midfoot, suffered through planar faceitis over last sevral years, orthotics with arch supports has remedied this for most part.

OK, that kind of sums me up.

Bought me some Keen Durand Hiking shoes, bought size 14, I usually wear 13 in gym shoes, but when I tested them at REI and step down the rock thing, seemed like a lot of pressure on smaller toes, so I upsized to stop that. Bought Keen instead of other brands because it seem to give my forefoot comfortable room even though I have narrow feet, others seemed to be tight.
Problem with all brands is I seem to have some heal slippage, because I have such narrow heels and with orthotic insert, it raises my heel up a little which makes it more apt to slide.

Backpack, I bought a Gregory 65l backpack, got it fitted and it works pretty well I think. 1st back pack I have ever used. I put about 25-30lbs in it today, to get feel of load and fit.

TODAY - I went for a 4 mile hike with my new gear, moderate climbs, no more than 150 ft ascents or descents. It was about 91 heat index, but not that bad under canopy.
I say this because by half way, I thought was going to die! LOL My hips, and glutes were cramping on climbs, heart rate was through the roof. Shoulders were beginning to wear down, getting really tight, I was able to alleviate some of this by simply releasing shoulder straps a little, but that put all pressure on lower back, and it was getting really tight. But biggest issue was glutes and hips were killing me.

Shoes did better than I expected, I walk the 1st mile without my orthotics, foot did not slip much at all. But it seemed the farther I went the looser the shoe got, I can't seem to be able to tighten the low cut up enough to stop all slippage. The toe room was comfortable, but my foot would slide quite a bit to side if going down hill or slipping on rock and foot happened to move to side real fast....I don't know if this is normal or should I have tighter shoe. I felt my forefoot being able to move around quite a bit, need to know if this is OK. It seemed shoestrings loosened during hike, despite me tieing them as tight as possible with double knot. Also I put orthotics in after 1 mile, and it seemed to help stablility and a little knee pain I was having, but did create looser fit. I will say my heel seems to slide up only about 1/4 to 3/8 of inch, seems to have more play though side to side.
I will add that I had no hot spots or anything near a blister today, other than just real tired feet.
WP shoes stayed dry throughout hike, despite very wet muddy trail, and 1 hour of rain.
4 mile hike took me 2 hrs, 37min including about 5 short breaks, 1st one I enjoyed and wanted to see overlook, last 4 were for survival :).

Questions
1. What about shoes? Does this sound normal, will I face major issues on longer hikes? Any suggestions for narrow feet with high arches? I am going to go tomorrow and try to get thinner arch supports made that wont push foot up as high.
2. Glute and hip issues? This made the trip miserable at times, heart rate you can rest and bring down, cramping butt resumes on very next incline. I am figuring some of this is flexibility, I have been stiff and inflexible all my life.
3. How much of this will pass as I hike more? I realize I am not in hiking shape by no means, but I need some ideas from others who have been there and what I need to do to prepare for future AT?
4. Lower back got really tight, few spasms, shoulders too, what should I do to prepare more for that issue?
5. Is it crazy to think if i have that much issue with 150ft ascents that I could even consider doing Smoky Mtn hike next year at my age, hard to rest climbing a mtn?

Any other suggestions are greatly appreciated!

By the way, I also wore Marino wool socks, now those are well worth money, super!

changed
07-28-2015, 00:19
If you're having that many issues with such a mellow walk, you might want to reconsider. That, or take up yoga classes between now and then. Really.

Maui Rhino
07-28-2015, 00:24
How much walking do you do in your daily life? Increasing your daily steps will help condition your glutes and hips, and cut down on that soreness. Biking is a weight-supported activity and doesn't use the same muscles as walking. Stretching is also good for your muscles, as well as your overall health and well-being. Most important is that you have started to get out and hike.....Now keep it up.

nsherry61
07-28-2015, 00:34
Most issues will go away with fitness and continuous tweeting and expermenting. DON'T GIVE UP! Cramping in hot weather may be electrolight balance issues. Add some salts to your water. Potassium and calcium shortage can be a cause of cramping/spasms.

Feral Bill
07-28-2015, 00:59
How much weight was in your pack? You may want to start light and work up to a it more weight.

Siestita
07-28-2015, 01:00
Boo-Yah--Have you done much car camping along with day hikes in the Smokies or elsewhere in the Southern Appalachians? If not, consider doing that for a few days, perhaps during a long weekend. Sometime in September when things have cooled down a bit might be even better for you to enjoy, weather wise. Starting out hiking or backpacking amid mild temperatures, at the time of year when rain is least likely to fall, makes sense I think.

Day hike at a leisurely pace, maybe a little slower then you went today, in the shoes that you have described, but carrying in your pack far less then the 25 to 30 lbs. that you hauled today. As an alternative to the Smokies, consider car camping and day hiking in the Mount Rogers National Recreation Area/Grayson Highlands of Southwestern Virginia, another beauty spot where relatively high elevations (by Appalachian standards) cool things down considerably, even in mid-summer.

Have you day hiked much here in the Kentucky in the Daniel Boone National Forest? Stretching southward there from near Morehead, the Sheltowee Trace continues for over 270 miles to Red River Gorge, Natural Bridge State Park, and Cumberland Falls State Park, before terminating in the Big South Fork National Recreation area in Tennessee. Right now its nearly as hot along the Trace as it is where you and I live, in Georgetown and Frankfort respectively. But, from early September through October that will be a great place to backpack or take day hikes.

Siestita
07-28-2015, 02:27
"So I thought I better start getting ready for it with some smaller hikes and gear purchases."

Because White Blaze attracts many long distance section hikers and many goal focused thru hikers, while reading posts here one can overlook several realities. Camping out in the woods, away from roads, can enjoyable even when the distances that one covers are relatively short and the walking pace leisurely. And, its possible to begin backpacking without spending very much money on equipment. For example, when, as a cash strapped student, I first took up this hobby 43 years ago I could barely afford to buy a sleeping bag and pack. So, for some years my backpacking "shelter" was just a makeshift tarp, consisting of a large piece of plastic , some cord, and some aluminum tent stakes. More recently I've sometimes showed Boy Scouts how to assemble and use similar equipment, taking them out with it at times and places that I knew would not be "buggy".


Backpacking stoves are fun to collect and play with, but for most beginners it is not really necessary to carry one. Many hikers manage to backpack enjoyably going "stove-less/cook-less"". Also,if he or she wants to do so, that person can get through a two night weekend outing enjoyably consuming "regular food", items purchased in route to the trail at a fast food restaurant or the deli section of a supermarket. Or, one can cook effectively just by burning alcohol in an empty Fancy Feast cat food can. A hiker does not necessarily need to have a special stove and titanium pot to backpack, nor are pricy "high performance" clothing items needed to safely hike amid favorably "forgiving" weather conditions.

So, rather than waiting until next summer to go backpacking, why not try doing it sometime this Fall, slowly walking in at least a couple of miles from your car and then spending a night or two becoming accustomed to "living in the woods". There are some good places to do that located within just two or three hours drive from Georgetown.

If you go backpacking with me I guarantee that the pace walked will be relaxed, averaging just one mile per hour. Age, temperament and perhaps also lingering effects from my having had polio as child slow me down these days, but I still love camping outdoors. And, I have some extra gear that you could use, including cooking stuff, a sleeping bag, a pad, and a tarp that is large enough to keep even a 6"4' giant dry if it rains. Send me a White Blaze personal message if you are interested.

Siestita
07-28-2015, 03:25
Boo Yah--Here is a resource that you might find helpful. Kentucky's Sierra Club sponsors group hikes, backpacks, and other outdoor events. And, they occasionally present a "backpacking class". Kentucky's Sierra Club has weekend backpacking trips scheduled in August , September, and October. The October 17-18 trip is for just one night. Apparently its designed to accommodate "beginners", including people who have participated in evening class sessions that will be held in Lexington about backpacking. Those will take place Oct. 6, 8, 13, and 15. I'll provide a link below. Also, this information can be accessed by googling: Sierra Club Cumberland Chapter Outings Calendar.

http://kentucky.sierraclub.org/getoutdoors/calendar.asp#.VbcsKPlEN8E

illabelle
07-28-2015, 05:38
I second the recommendation to do some daily stretches. Practice good posture. Do a lot of hiking. If possible with the time you have available, hike in the morning/evening and avoid that 91 afternoon sweltering heat. There's no shame in covering only 4 miles. You've got to work up to it. If you haven't been hiking much at all, you'll need to work on both distance and carrying weight. Might be easier to do them separately at first - 5 miles w/ no pack, 2 miles w/ pack, gradually increase distances.

There's no reason a person your size without a physical disability couldn't carry 30 pounds or more for a long distance, but it does take some time for your body to adjust to backpacking. You seem to be well tuned-in to what your body is telling you. That's a great place to start.

Boo-Yah
07-28-2015, 08:08
I was probably a little overzealous yesterday. I am in decent shape in other areas, I can easily bike 20 miles, swim 400 meters, run couple of miles, 5k if I had to, bench 270lbs, BUT legs are not proportionally as strong, and walking up hills always has been tough. Without pack I have done a couple of miles in woods with average effort
I do plan to do day hikes on weekends, red river gorge very soon
I may have middescribed hip issues, more like tight muscle spasm, than muscle cramps

Boo-Yah
07-28-2015, 08:10
How does shoe fit sound comparitely?

Moosling
07-28-2015, 08:11
As others have said Stretches are super important, try laying on your back with one leg crossed over the other and pull your leg up towards your chest, then do the other leg.

This is a hard stretch to do but its totally worth it, it will loosen your lower back and your glutes big time! Trust me on this I learned it after being in a hospital bed for 2 months.

Boo-Yah
07-28-2015, 08:12
Sounds good Siesta, I'll try to figure out messaging on White Blaze, thanks for offer

Boo-Yah
07-28-2015, 08:26
Yoga classes and stretching is a must, I am very very tight, always have been, especially in hips and hamstrings

Boo-Yah
07-28-2015, 08:28
Never done much walking, always preferred to jog rather than walk. And usually when I jog or walk it is relatively flat land or track.

Boo-Yah
07-28-2015, 08:33
I am a football coach, talked to my trainer yesterday and he gave me some glute and IT band stretches, will start working on them daily.

Boo-Yah
07-28-2015, 08:36
If you're having that many issues with such a mellow walk, you might want to reconsider. That, or take up yoga classes between now and then. Really.

Yoga classes and stretching is a must, I am very very tight, always have been, especially in hips and hamstrings

Just Bill
07-28-2015, 08:41
Questions
1. What about shoes? Does this sound normal, will I face major issues on longer hikes? Any suggestions for narrow feet with high arches? I am going to go tomorrow and try to get thinner arch supports made that wont push foot up as high.
2. Glute and hip issues? This made the trip miserable at times, heart rate you can rest and bring down, cramping butt resumes on very next incline. I am figuring some of this is flexibility, I have been stiff and inflexible all my life.
3. How much of this will pass as I hike more? I realize I am not in hiking shape by no means, but I need some ideas from others who have been there and what I need to do to prepare for future AT?
4. Lower back got really tight, few spasms, shoulders too, what should I do to prepare more for that issue?
5. Is it crazy to think if i have that much issue with 150ft ascents that I could even consider doing Smoky Mtn hike next year at my age, hard to rest climbing a mtn?


1-https://www.google.com/search?q=lacing+techniques+for+running&rlz=1C1GGGE___US635US635&espv=2&biw=1083&bih=751&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0CDoQsARqFQoTCOj0xr3p_cYCFUMYkgodh3IPQA&dpr=1

Hopefully this link works right- should take you to several versions of different lacing techniques for shoes. Play with a few of them- great for fine tuning the fit when you've found that near perfect shoe. They won't make a bad shoe good, but they can make a good shoe great.

2- I think mainly your issue is just not walking much. Different muscles. I can outwalk all my running friends but couldn't touch them on a 5k. I can walk further in a day than I can bike ride. Sitting on the seat kills my ass. Specifically- hip abductors machines should be added to your gym time to help you build those muscles quickly.

3- Simply adding some evening walks around the block will do a ton for you. Think of it just like running, you wouldn't enter a 10k off the couch... that's basically what you did. And added your body weight and pack weight to the challenge.

4- Overall, Pilates would help you quite a bit. With all the bike riding you probably don't have a very developed core. Pilates is core focused, as well as building general flexibility. A bit more sport specific than yoga IMO. At the gym; shoulder shrugs and military press will give you the fastest results to build some shoulder muscles up for the pack. You can also do weighted arm swings and flys if you are gym focused.

5- No, you just need to prepare. Being a flat lander I get my butt kicked whenever I go east or west, there just aren't any climbs in my normal walking that compare. Take it easy. At the gym, an incline treadmill and stair machine help a ton.

Another Kevin
07-28-2015, 09:09
Hey! :welcome to WhiteBlaze, and congratulations on becoming a backpacker!

(Because if you've toted your gear into the woods and spent a night there, you're a backpacker. Compared with that, all the rest of what we yammer on about here is just details.)

Ain't no shame in having your first trip be 4 miles. When I take people on their first backpacks, I typically plan an in-and-out or short loop to a campsite, no more than 1-2 miles off the road. That way it's easy to get back to the cars if anything goes wrong. I also recommend that people try out their gear in the back yard or car camp with it (nothing says you can't pitch a backpacking tarp at a car campsite!) before trying to make miles with it on their backs.

Is that pack fitted correctly? At 6'4", you're probably really long in the torso. If it's too short, what is going to happen is that you're going to have to lengthen the ladder straps too far to get it to rest on your hips, and then it's going to sway like anything. It'll kill your hips trying to keep it in balance. You'll also have the sternum strap right up at the base of your neck, which isn't comfortable, and you'll have the remaining weight right on top of your shoulders, because the load lifters won't work. The weight of the shoulder yoke, with the lifters adjusted right, rests on your collarbones and not on your shoulders. Get it doublechecked by someone that knows how to fit a pack. Most experienced hikers do. A great many clerks at outfitters' stores do not.

Also, if you have the Baltoro 65, that's a heavy pack - over five pounds. My daughter swears by her Gregory Deva, but I'd find it way too heavy. If you're piling 25-30 pounds of stuff into it, you are talking a 30-35 pound pack weight. That's bearable if you're used to it, but it's heavier than a lot of us want to go. I think I got up to that weight once last fall, but that was starting out with provisions for six days and 2-3 pounds of nonessentials. I often go over that weight in winter, but winter gear is heavy and most hikers don't even get out in winter here Up North.

Those Gregory packs are built to be as comfortable as possible with big loads. In warm weather, most of us don't need big loads. In any case, you can certainly start training hikes with a lighter load. If you're sensible about gear, you won't need anywhere near 30-35 pounds for an overnighter or long weekend, which is what you should be doing until you've worked up to more.

It's sounding to me as if you're charging up those little 150 foot ascents at your normal walking pace. If you're stopping to pant, you're going too fast. (And they add up - if you were going over a roller coaster of little 150 footers, that's just as hard as climbing a mountain.) Don't worry about going slow, even standing still for a second or two on each step ("rest stepping," it's called). The conditioning will come. By the way, if you had as many as 3-4 of those little hills, you're close to my pace, and I've been doing this stuff (as a clueless weekender, not a long-distance hiker) for a long time. I figure 30 minutes to the mile, add 40 minutes for every 1000 feet of elevation change. (Down is just as slow as up!).

If you're concerned with the ability to make miles per day, don't be. That's about how long you can keep it up, not how fast you go. I don't worry overmuch about big mileage. I plan myself nice, comfortable 8-12 mile days, and indulge my vices such as photography and map making.

glenlawson
07-28-2015, 09:18
1. What about thicker socks? I find that my feet swell a little as I walk, but you may be different. The lacing pattern could be helpful. If you have a brand of running shoes that work really well, maybe you could try a trail runner in that brand?
2. Keep hiking, maybe next time drop your weight to 10 to 15 pounds. I tend to keep my shoulder straps loose so I can be more flexible around my torso.
3. Backpacking really is different from the other activities. Maybe you should try this trail without weight to see how you do? Is it the different stepping motions that is causing some discomfort until you work up to it?
4. Stretch daily, like you said.
5. Nope, not crazy. People in worse shape than you start at Springer and walk to Maine each year. It may take some time to work out the foot problems. I love my Keens, but you may need a different brand.

I really like hiking poles for some of these issues. They help transfer some of the weight from my knees and hips to my arms. I can really notice the difference at the end of the day.

Sometimes I think we should take some advice from the mountain bikers. There is a trail near here that is considered kind a beginner trail. Another trail is more of an intermediate trail. The common wisdom among mtnbikers is when you can do three loops of the beginner trail without getting off your bike, you are ready for the intermediate trail. Maybe you should adopt that approach. Keep walking around your neighborhood or school. Put on a small pack with a few pounds in it. Then head back to that same trail. Keep at this until either you can hike that trail under those conditions with ease, or you decide that other factors such as foot problems outweigh your desire to backpack.

nsherry61
07-28-2015, 11:28
+1 on trekking poles to assist with many of the above issues.

Berserker
07-28-2015, 12:21
2- I think mainly your issue is just not walking much. Different muscles. I can outwalk all my running friends but couldn't touch them on a 5k. I can walk further in a day than I can bike ride. Sitting on the seat kills my ass. Specifically- hip abductors machines should be added to your gym time to help you build those muscles quickly.

3- Simply adding some evening walks around the block will do a ton for you. Think of it just like running, you wouldn't enter a 10k off the couch... that's basically what you did. And added your body weight and pack weight to the challenge.
This sums it up well. I used to be in really good shape when I was younger, but it was primarily form cycling. Went on a hike one weekend, and it kicked my rear. Nowadays most of my exercise involves walking and short runs on local trails. When I actually go out to backpack I don't notice many issues since I'm walking as part of my normal exercise. I think you just need to work some more walking into your normal exercise routine.

One other thing that may help is walking on trails (if that's an option for you). I noticed that this made a huge difference for me. I used to have "weak" ankles and feet, which I now believe is just another word for "I walk on flat surfaces all the time and my ankles and feet aren't used to flexing in different directions". I used to sprain my ankles a lot, and now that rarely happens as all the trail walking/running puts my feet at all different angles thus strengthening my ankles and feet significantly.

Uncle Joe
07-28-2015, 12:23
Boo-Ya I'm just starting myself. I bike regularly, road and mountain. I walk frequently. I'm finding that day hikes with a water bottle and packing a load are two different things. I've been doing 4-6mi "hikes" with water after work with little issue. I strapped on a 18-20lb pack and after my first hike my hips really bothered me. Took the week off, except for a bike ride that week, and the next hike with the pack yielded no post-hike pain. The body just needs to adjust. I'd suggest that you do some walks with something on your back but start lower weight. Work your way up to your pack load. Give yourself time to rest and the hips and glutes will work themselves out. For shoes, check out Youtube for some lacing techniques that may help you isolate areas better. I have a lot of room in the front of my shoe. I don't like that but everything I've been told is for hiking that's what you want. That said, I try to secure the foot otherwise to prevent too much movement.

naturlred
07-28-2015, 13:48
First....dont ever think you are too old to hike.

I would try yoga, specific therapy for tight hamstrings, and walk, walk, walk.

As for your shoes...if you had no blisters after this trial hike.....and they felt good except a little slipping.....be happy and hike. Everyone has an issue or two with footwear, but if they felt good and you had no pain/blood/open sores I'd say stick with them. The further you hike the more swelling your feet be and they may not slip as much eventually.

Good Luck.




naturalred.wordpress.wom

Boo-Yah
07-28-2015, 15:36
Wow! thanks for all the advice and encouragement, I am sure this will help, feel more confidant already.

I went to gym today, and walk a mile on big treadmill, worked up and down from 15 to 25 degree angle, kicked my butt again, but good work, followed up with alot of glute and ham stretching, leg press, body squats, leg extensions, glute machine, situps, planks and leg lifts, mixing in glute and hip stretchs throughout.

tired but feels better, just got to stay with it

ralph23
07-28-2015, 22:08
This is gonna sting, but given that height and weight, you are obese. That said, I congratulate you on getting outside and moving. But you have to be cognizant of the fact that, given your age, it will take months to work your body up to being able to do hours of strenuous activity. I'm not saying it can't be done but you have to plan a smart, slow increase in physical activity from week to week with rest weeks. You overdid it on your first hike and are paying the price. Get back on the trail with no pack and slowly increase miles and heart rate. Good luck!

theoilman
07-28-2015, 22:23
I would think the foot sliding/motion in the shoes you describe will lead to issues. Since I am dealing with p.f. also, I would think you need to use the orthotics all the time. Plus as another suggested, maybe different/better socks? Smartwool or darn tough, you may have to experiment with the different weights. It sounds like you tried a number of different shoes to arrive at your current ones. But you still may need to try others at a different outfitter looking for what suits you best.
Getting your shoes/feet right is one of the biggest decisions. Pack size and fit second. A pack that is 1 lb heavier but fits much better will seem/carry lighter. Many have so many adjustments it takes several attempts to get it set right.
The 91 deg you started in will definitely be an issue and helping cause a start out problem. 25 to 30 lbs to start in that heat probably contributed to wearing you out fast. Work up to it. Several overnight and 2 night weekend hikes will help you sort out what you can handle.

Shutterbug
07-28-2015, 23:23
... 5. Is it crazy to think if i have that much issue with 150ft ascents that I could even consider doing Smoky Mtn hike next year at my age, hard to rest climbing a mtn?




At age 53, you problem isn't your age. It may be your conditioning. If you start now getting in shape, you shouldn't have a problem doing a Smoky Mtn hike.

How do you get in hiking shape:

1. Get your weight under control. If you are overweight, drop those extra lbs.
2. Start walking -- 10,000 step a day
3. Work out with weights 3 times a week.

If you will do these things, you won't have a problem hiking in the Smoky Mountains. I am still doing tough hikes, like Grand Canyon rim to rim to rime at age 72.

illabelle
07-29-2015, 03:43
This is gonna sting, but given that height and weight, you are obese. That said, I congratulate you...

Good point above, but don't let that discourage you, Booyah. Not so very long ago, I had crossed that same line on the BMI chart, but I was still able to backpack, and now I'm just 2 pounds from being "normal" weight. You indicated that you are already active - a huge plus - so it's just a matter of training your body for a different activity and developing the conditioning and flexibility that it requires. The weight will drop off if you keep at it and eat sensibly (high fiber natural unprocessed foods are ideal).

Boo-Yah
07-29-2015, 09:28
This is gonna sting, but given that height and weight, you are obese. That said, I congratulate you on getting outside and moving. But you have to be cognizant of the fact that, given your age, it will take months to work your body up to being able to do hours of strenuous activity. I'm not saying it can't be done but you have to plan a smart, slow increase in physical activity from week to week with rest weeks. You overdid it on your first hike and are paying the price. Get back on the trail with no pack and slowly increase miles and heart rate. Good luck!

You are right about being overweight, or classified as obese. you are little off on doing strenuous activity for a couple of hours, I can jump on my bike and ride 25 miles today for a couple of hours, competed in two sprint triathlons in last two years.
But I agree with you on other accounts, got to get walking muscles in shape, and not push too hard to quick, hopefully get weight down too in process. But I will say I see a lot of overweight people hiking.

Boo-Yah
07-29-2015, 09:31
I would think the foot sliding/motion in the shoes you describe will lead to issues. Since I am dealing with p.f. also, I would think you need to use the orthotics all the time. Plus as another suggested, maybe different/better socks? Smartwool or darn tough, you may have to experiment with the different weights. It sounds like you tried a number of different shoes to arrive at your current ones. But you still may need to try others at a different outfitter looking for what suits you best.
Getting your shoes/feet right is one of the biggest decisions. Pack size and fit second. A pack that is 1 lb heavier but fits much better will seem/carry lighter. Many have so many adjustments it takes several attempts to get it set right.
The 91 deg you started in will definitely be an issue and helping cause a start out problem. 25 to 30 lbs to start in that heat probably contributed to wearing you out fast. Work up to it. Several overnight and 2 night weekend hikes will help you sort out what you can handle.

Thanks oilman, my pack feels great, it is tad bigger than what I need now, but I felt like the extra pound of pack weight was worth have extra room if needed in future. I will not start out on such ambitious hikes with 25lb pack anymore till Im ready, and as others have mentioned, i will slow pace down. I am a competitor by nature in athletics, have always challenged myself in workouts, think my ego and pride got best of me that day.

Boo-Yah
07-29-2015, 09:35
Good point above, but don't let that discourage you, Booyah. Not so very long ago, I had crossed that same line on the BMI chart, but I was still able to backpack, and now I'm just 2 pounds from being "normal" weight. You indicated that you are already active - a huge plus - so it's just a matter of training your body for a different activity and developing the conditioning and flexibility that it requires. The weight will drop off if you keep at it and eat sensibly (high fiber natural unprocessed foods are ideal).

As with most men, I drop weight fairly easy, a couple of years ago I dropped 65, in 6 months, and was at my fastest and strongest in 20 years, as with most people we fall of wagon and slowly it creeps back up on us. If I can drop 20 from where I am at, I feel pretty dang good and strong for my size, I have large frame and carry my weight well. Thanks for encouragement!

Boo-Yah
07-29-2015, 09:36
Impressive and inspiring Shutterbug

Boo-Yah
08-01-2015, 10:22
1-https://www.google.com/search?q=lacing+techniques+for+running&rlz=1C1GGGE___US635US635&espv=2&biw=1083&bih=751&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0CDoQsARqFQoTCOj0xr3p_cYCFUMYkgodh3IPQA&dpr=1

Hopefully this link works right- should take you to several versions of different lacing techniques for shoes. Play with a few of them- great for fine tuning the fit when you've found that near perfect shoe. They won't make a bad shoe good, but they can make a good shoe great.

2- I think mainly your issue is just not walking much. Different muscles. I can outwalk all my running friends but couldn't touch them on a 5k. I can walk further in a day than I can bike ride. Sitting on the seat kills my ass. Specifically- hip abductors machines should be added to your gym time to help you build those muscles quickly.

3- Simply adding some evening walks around the block will do a ton for you. Think of it just like running, you wouldn't enter a 10k off the couch... that's basically what you did. And added your body weight and pack weight to the challenge.

4- Overall, Pilates would help you quite a bit. With all the bike riding you probably don't have a very developed core. Pilates is core focused, as well as building general flexibility. A bit more sport specific than yoga IMO. At the gym; shoulder shrugs and military press will give you the fastest results to build some shoulder muscles up for the pack. You can also do weighted arm swings and flys if you are gym focused.

5- No, you just need to prepare. Being a flat lander I get my butt kicked whenever I go east or west, there just aren't any climbs in my normal walking that compare. Take it easy. At the gym, an incline treadmill and stair machine help a ton.

Update, did two leg workouts at gym, and both days walked on incline treadmill at anywhere from 15 to 25 degree incline. Took about 30 minutes to do mile, soaked and sweat, heart rate up, but all good, followed with good leg workout.
Yesterday hiked about 4 miles in Red River Gorge, 15lb pack this time, it was really tough again, pretty rugged in places, but I survived and felt better afterwards then hike before, so I am getting there.
thanks

Venchka
08-01-2015, 21:39
Way to go. I hit the gym today. The real test for me will be to visit the gym daily.
Good luck.

Wayne


Sent from somewhere around here.

Siestita
09-06-2015, 03:50
"Yesterday hiked about 4 miles in Red River Gorge, 15 lb. pack this time, it was really tough again, pretty rugged in places, but I survived and felt better afterwards then hike before, so I am getting there."

Congratulations. In my opinion hiking in Red River Gorge can be just as challenging as walking the AT through the Smokies. In both places its sometimes helpful to slow down, both to catch ones breath and also to adjust to challenging trail conditions (roots, rocks, mud, ups, downs...). And, when one hikes more slowly, fewer injuries occur.

At this time of year, early September, each day has about 12 hours of light. That's far more time than you and I are likely to want to be moving along the trail, at any speed. So, consider ambling along the trail rather than treating it as as a race or an athletic event. What extraordinary things, large and small, did you see during your four mile jaunt at the Gorge back on August first?

It appears, Boo-Yah,that a key aspect of backpacking that you may not have mastered quite yet is actually sleeping out in the woods, doing so in a quiet place away from roads and vehicles. As I mentioned earlier, I have some equipment that you could borrow if you want to do a leisurely two night weekend trip here in Kentucky with me. The private message system here on White Blaze can be confusing to use. So, if you are interested, I can be reached at christopher.daniel@kysu.edu or at 502-227-2620.

As a football coach, you may not have any fall weekends free. Fortunately, the weather is also often similarly good for backpacking here in Kentucky during the spring, including April and May. Chris

lemon b
09-06-2015, 05:39
Can relate with your experience. Same type of issues happened to me after I took many years off from real hiking due to family issues.

1) With a backpack on shoes or boots react differently. My first issue was toes. So the answer is yes I believe you may need different foot-ware., except for the socks. The only way to get into condition for hiking up & down mountains is to do exactly that. Also what I did was cut 15 % of my body weight. Than another 12%. Also made it a habit to wear my hiking boots to work and to do 2 miles at lunchtime and 3 after work without pack weight for years. On weekends I'd go out with lighter pack. Upgraded to base-camp type hiking on weekends. Got in the bag nights and did many loops with half load, than 3/4 than full. Also, I went to an experienced outfitter and purchased a different pack, tested a few. Make sure to bring your 5 night load. In addition, being an old school hiker I hesitated on getting hiking poles. Found that two was cumberson, settled on using one. Also made sure to drink as much water as possible.

Also, as I've aged the miles had to be cut back. To me its about bag nights not miles. Also opened my mind to new ideas from younger folks on equipment.
Take it a day at a time, the trail legs will come back. Most of all HAVE FUN!