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AO2134
08-14-2015, 10:52
Hey guys. I am a weekend warrior and I have been incredibly blessed with weather since I started hiking 1 year ago. I am close to 700 miles since I started last year and I barely ever had to deal with weather.

This weekend I was thinking about finishing the Bartram Trail and camping at Cheoah Bald. In the morning I would make my way down. I am itching to finish this hike, but I don't want a viewless and much worse thunderstorm kind of ending to this hike while camping at a bald. I know there is sassafras shelter down the hill a bit if the thunderstorm becomes too much, but I still would like to finish the hike on a beautiful day.

So how do you guys decide whether to risk the weather to go hiking when the itch is strong, but the weather looks pretty bad?

15 Aug will be with moderate temperatures and the weather will be unstable, thunderstorms likely. There is a 60% probability of moderate rainfall and showers.

SteelCut
08-14-2015, 11:03
Thunderstorms don't deter my hike ... I hike regardless if a trip is scheduled. Storms only dictate where I want/dont want to camp. Cheoah Bald is not a good place in a lightning storm. I would do your trip regardless and if it's stormy walk down to the shelter and tent there (or stay in the shelter if you are into that kind of thing).

BTW, I just went over Cheoah Bald via the AT this past Tuesday in heavy rain. Slick on the downhill but not a big deal. No views :-(

illabelle
08-14-2015, 11:04
Except for a dayhike, most every hike we take involves clearing our calendar of work or personal responsibilities. Aborting a hike isn't done lightly, and re-scheduling on short notice can be a major pain.

If the weather is life-threatening (blizzard, for example) or will make us absolutely miserable (monsoon), we would stay home. But summer thunderstorms are seldom an all-day event. Normally there's a front moving through with terrible wind, lightning, and torrential rain - and then it calms down. If we can avoid the brunt of the storm, we'll probably still go out. Only 60% probability of moderate rain? For sure, we'll go out.

Just Bill
08-14-2015, 11:06
Depends...
If you have the luxury of flexibility, might as well take advantage of it.

But like many a hiker who misses even a single clear hour in a place like the Whites... as long as it's safe you just go.
Having been blessed with fantastic weather as well, I understand the sentiment that it is a completely different experience when you have good conditions.

Or if you still want to get out but don't want to miss a "highlight", maybe go knock out a different section or area that won't be as affected. If you're open to it, hiking in the rain has it's own beauty.

I don't remember the regulations or possibilities exactly at that spot, though I remember the small site and the view. If I recall correctly, the bald wasn't that big, and a site could be found just off the bald in the trees... A lightning storm on a southern bald, with a safe camp stashed a short distance away, may prove to be quite the sight and provide a show to rival any view.

Tipi Walter
08-14-2015, 11:25
I don't remember the regulations or possibilities exactly at that spot, though I remember the small site and the view. If I recall correctly, the bald wasn't that big, and a site could be found just off the bald in the trees... A lightning storm on a southern bald, with a safe camp stashed a short distance away, may prove to be quite the sight and provide a show to rival any view.

Cheoah Bald regulations (or possibilities)?? There are none and don't ever ask the local forest service if there are regulations on the Bald or they will awaken from their slumber and find some. But so far it's a wide open place free for camping as God intended.

https://tipiwalter.smugmug.com/Backpacking2006/With-Amy-Willow-On-The/i-MTcLtPq/0/L/57-21%20%20Willow%20on%20Cheoah%20Bald-L.jpg
Cheoah Bald in all it's glory when I hiked with Amy Willow in 2006. And in 2009 Gearfreak posted this on Whiteblaze:

Water on Cheoah Bald

"There is a spring a couple hundred yards down the west side of the mountain. When you get into the trees, there are plastic ribbons tied on bushes marking the way. In the center of the field at the bottom of the bald, there is a farm/access "road bed". Follow this road for about 30 yards, right before the road turns to the right, there is an old orange flag/tape tied to a limb on the left side of the road. Follow this path, which is marked by an occasional orange flag/tape to the bottom of a small ravine/draw, about 30 yards. The "path" then turns to the right/down hill following the draw to a good spring/creek, about 20 yards. Overall it is around 3/10 of mile from the top of the bald to the water source, it is steep.

This is quite dated so the flagging may be gone."

AO2134
08-14-2015, 11:37
Cheoah Bald regulations (or possibilities)?? There are none and don't ever ask the local forest service if there are regulations on the Bald or they will awaken from their slumber and find some. But so far it's a wide open place free for camping as God intended.

https://tipiwalter.smugmug.com/Backpacking2006/With-Amy-Willow-On-The/i-MTcLtPq/0/L/57-21%20%20Willow%20on%20Cheoah%20Bald-L.jpg
Cheoah Bald in all it's glory when I hiked with Amy Willow in 2006. And in 2009 Gearfreak posted this on Whiteblaze:"

A little selfish I know, but I want a day like that to finish the BT. I have the flexibility of endless weekends to do it, but I also want to finish the BT desperately. I guess I am answering my own question, but I am not liking the answer. The itch is strong on this one.

Just Bill
08-14-2015, 11:52
Well Tipi... the times they are a changing.

Have to be a bit cautious these days when suggesting a site unfortunately. So fer public stuff, best to suggest looking into and following the rules. Quite likely there is a rule floating around some place, quite likely it sits unenforced until it's abused. That bald seems a place primed for abuse.

Now fer a fine bit of tramping out and away from such places... we can go back to the rules as set by the fella that made the place.
Ain't no one else likely to come by and say otherwise nor many that will follow you.

Bronk
08-14-2015, 12:45
If I knew it would rain all day both days of a two day trip I might cancel it, but really rain is part of the whole experience. I can have a good time in the woods even if I'm soaked to the bone. If you don't have good views you can always do that section again.

nsherry61
08-14-2015, 12:52
Having grown up in the Pacific NW, we learned that if you want to do outdoor activities, you do them, weather be damned!
There is a strong sense of power in that attitude.

What I learned:

1) Some of the truly most amazing and spectacular views and scenes I have ever seen have been on trips where rotten weather was expected and/or had. There is a drama in dramatic weather that is unsurpassed and missed if one avoids that same dramatic weather due to fear of rain, wind, cold, or whatever.

2) Traveling in bad weather to the point of becoming confident in your skills at being reasonably comfortable and always safe enable more trips in more places during more spectacular and dramatic conditions.

3) Often bad weather just plain sucks and is miserable, and there isn't much of a good side except for the stories of suffering and misery you get to share with others when you get back . . . but, like beating your head against a wall, and then stopping, the next hike in good weather is all the more sweet due to the suffering of the past.

Hike far, hike often and hike free.

PatmanTN
08-14-2015, 13:11
FWIW, I camped on Cheoah last November and saw no signs posted about camping. There is big gnarly firepit up there but otherwise it was in great shape. shared the site with late arriving SOBOs also.

https://patricktn.smugmug.com/2014/Nov-20th-Nov-26th-Smokies-AT/i-8rBJrdr/0/M/Smokies_AT%20109-M.jpg
My tent


https://patricktn.smugmug.com/2014/Nov-20th-Nov-26th-Smokies-AT/i-kJdLHCp/0/M/Smokies_AT%20107-M.jpg

Eastern view


https://patricktn.smugmug.com/2014/Nov-20th-Nov-26th-Smokies-AT/i-VvdNWC8/0/M/Smokies_AT%20122-M.jpg

Sunset was awesome

Wülfgang
08-14-2015, 13:17
Like others have said if you always wait for clear, pleasant weather you wont do much hiking in your life.

I've hiked quite a bit back east in NH and PA and generally lighting is less of a concern out there compared to here. I remember humidity and drizzling rain but seldom, if ever, proximal lighting.

Conditions I would cancel for in the Rockies are: very cold temps (below 15 F or so---I had a very close call once), blizzard conditions, blistering heat in an exposed area...and high thunderstorm likelihood in an exposed area. I also only day hike in the winter.

I'd say just go and prepare for rain unless your heart is set on those views.

gsingjane
08-14-2015, 17:58
Hi, I see you are in Georgia and probably do a lot of your hiking around there? With her summer job my daughter has been living in the field this summer in national and state parks in VA, NC and for the next three weeks, Congerie in SC. She says it rains every single day. Usually a heavy afternoon downpour, and then clears right up again. I think she's gotten used to it.

I'm not a huge rain fan myself, but like the others say - it's all part of the experience. Now if I'm bringing out groups or young kids I'm more cautious, but when it's just me, I figure that's part of it.

Jane

MuddyWaters
08-14-2015, 21:32
if its a frontal system, you probably can count on bad weather
otherwise, its hit or miss
60% scattered thunderstorms means 40% is not
mountains make their own weather, pinpoint forecast is difficult
If you wait for perfect forecast, you will never get to go

Dogwood
08-15-2015, 00:04
If waiting for the perfect forecast is a necessity for your hiking you're going to enjoy far less hiking.

This: "Some of the truly most amazing and spectacular views and scenes I have ever seen have been on trips where rotten weather was expected and/or had. There is a drama in dramatic weather that is unsurpassed and missed if one avoids that same dramatic weather due to fear of rain, wind, cold, or whatever.

Traveling in bad weather to the point of becoming confident in your skills at being reasonably comfortable and always safe enable more trips in more places during more spectacular and dramatic conditions."

I've learned to embrace questionable weather. And, I do mean I had to learn to do this, making the necessary mental adjustments, as we're bombarded with the idea that if weather isn't within narrow parameters it's "bad."

“LIFE isn't about waiting for the storm to pass,it's about learning to DANCE in the rain.”
― Vivian Greene (http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/769264.Vivian_Greene)

Offshore
08-15-2015, 08:17
Ask yourself 2 questions - 1. Will it be safe (given an honest assessment of expected conditions, your gear, and your skill level)? 2. Will it be fun (keeping in mind that new experiences may broaden your definition of fun)?

Another Kevin
08-15-2015, 10:21
I try to avoid blizzards, floods, above-timberline thunderstorms, and deep cold (-10F is about the limit of my best sleep system at the moment).

Much less, bring it on! Some of my best trips have been in marginal weather. It keeps the crowds away, keeps the bugs down, freezes the mud, what's not to like? ;)

But I've been weekending a long time, and have gear and skills to stay safe in marginal weather. So "will it be safe?" and "will it be fun?" are indeed the right questions. Allow for the possibility of Type 2 fun.

saltysack
08-15-2015, 14:33
Life's short! Trek on...adverse weather makes it exciting if you have the correct gear....a few years ago I arrived after dark at the back country kiosk to day a quick 1 night 24 mile SI loop hike. Last minute weather check called for temps near 10 deg and freezing rain!!! One of the best hikes I've been on! Yep i set my tent up inside carter gap shelter!!! Obviously no one else was dumb enough to be out in this crap![emoji16]


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Bronk
08-15-2015, 14:41
That is one of the nicer benefits of crappy weather: you're more likely to have the whole place to yourself. Its one of the things I like about winter camping.

Dogwood
08-15-2015, 19:42
That is one of the nicer benefits of crappy weather: you're more likely to have the whole place to yourself. Its one of the things I like about winter camping.

And the far reaching views with the deciduous trees not in leaf, and the sounds of crunching snow under foot, and the orange and purple winter sunsets and sunrises, and no crowds, and the wildlife and flora in winter mode, and frozen waterfalls, and icicles and rime on everything, and short cuts across frozen rivers and lakes, and blazing a virgin trail under snow being the first to leave a foot print, and the warmth of a campfire, and a hot meal, and a warming libation of choice, and the tight snuggling with your honey, and....and....isn't it great to be alive!

Dogwood
08-15-2015, 19:54
Some of the most memorable times in "bad" weather were hiking through Buckskin Gulch on New Years Eve, taking in the night atop Mt Whitney on New Yrs Eve(COLD and snowy), coastal hiking in Hawaii under a tsunami alert w/ HUGE 60 ft surf, hiking in Zion NP with 14" of snow falling, stepping out solo into a torrential down pore at 11 30 P.M. onto the Border Route Tr, hiking down into the Grand Canyon with 28" of snow at the S Rim TH, hiking through Bob Marshall Wilderness in 4 consecutive days of non stop down pores, slogging the AT in ME over five consecutive days of rain, slogging the BMT in 7 days straight of rain, crossing the Mojave or Sonoran Desert or Death valley in 110* + heat.......

scrabbler
08-15-2015, 21:47
Take some local hikes in the rain. Bad rain too. Half of the battle is attitude. If you can get used to it, and notice/enjoy the differences, rain just becomes another type of hiking instead of something dreaded.

peakbagger
08-16-2015, 07:41
In the Whites there are a couple of exposed ridgelines that are definitely to be avoided when thundershowers are expected. This is actually a spot on the AT on Mt Adams called Thunderstorm Junction. The problem with these two stretches is there is no where to go if bad weather moves in and on occasion what looks to be just a passing shower blows up into a thunderstorm in 15 or 20 minutes.

saltysack
08-16-2015, 11:24
And the far reaching views with the deciduous trees not in leaf, and the sounds of crunching snow under foot, and the orange and purple winter sunsets and sunrises, and no crowds, and the wildlife and flora in winter mode, and frozen waterfalls, and icicles and rime on everything, and short cuts across frozen rivers and lakes, and blazing a virgin trail under snow being the first to leave a foot print, and the warmth of a campfire, and a hot meal, and a warming libation of choice, and the tight snuggling with your honey, and....and....isn't it great to be alive!

+1...couldn't have said it better!!


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greentick
08-16-2015, 17:32
I work in a fluorescently lit box. My section hikes are a maybe once a year deal. I just plan for the forecast, get in it, and love it.

"we love it because it sucks"/WETSU!

AO2134
08-17-2015, 12:08
So I went up this weekend. . . .

This is what my reward was: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CVE1t0Hqe9E

Berserker
08-24-2015, 12:17
So how do you guys decide whether to risk the weather to go hiking when the itch is strong, but the weather looks pretty bad?
I don't have a lot of flexibility when I plan a trip so I just go pretty much no matter what. The only reason I would cancel is for something substantial such as a hurricane or blizzard. In 10 years of hiking I'd guess that it's been about 50/50 on my hikes, with 50% good weather and 50% foul weather.

Fredt4
08-24-2015, 13:49
I don't have a lot of flexibility when I plan a trip so I just go pretty much no matter what. The only reason I would cancel is for something substantial such as a hurricane or blizzard. In 10 years of hiking I'd guess that it's been about 50/50 on my hikes, with 50% good weather and 50% foul weather.


Not that we regularly got blizzards in east Tennessee, but the few times me got very hard snows the cross country skies came out.

Lnj
08-25-2015, 09:30
Its the things that push your boundaries the farthest, that make you feel the most alive.

rafe
08-25-2015, 10:08
That's the $64K question, eh. It's a decision that thru-hikers make moment to moment with the wisdom of experience plus lots of luck and pure guesswork. But you must know & respect your limits and have backup plans. Live to fight another day...

Your limits -- well, that depends on a million things, doesn't it?

Google "Then The Hail Came." (An AT thru-hiking journal.) Constant battle with weather... What do hikers think about? Food, water, weather, shelter from the storm are pretty much tied for the top few spots.

slbirdnerd
08-25-2015, 12:49
Just go. My first 130 miles of trail I had no rain... This year, I'm sitting in the bunkhouse at NOC waiting to hike NOBO and looking at the biggest blob of freaking green on the radar. I went anyway. It. Rained. HARD. I lived, it was an adventure, I was proud of myself, and heck, the sun even came out later!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LvcPqd-1Ov8

Yankee15
08-27-2015, 18:47
Must be nice to have the option not to hike in the rain...on my whole thru hike there was only one time we even considered not going and it was above treeline in the Whites...every other place you will be fine.

rafe
08-27-2015, 21:47
You get older, you have to be more careful about hiking in foul weather.

Casey & Gina
08-28-2015, 02:34
Much less, bring it on! Some of my best trips have been in marginal weather. It keeps the crowds away, keeps the bugs down, freezes the mud, what's not to like? ;)


I agree! No power in the universe will stop me from hiking when I have my mind set to it! Inclimate weather is a big part of why I love the outdoors! Whenever I get through some bad weather, I always feel extra good about myself. ;)

Disclaimer: I have not actually hiked through more than a few thunderstorms yet, but I have camped through almost everything, and am eager for the opportunity!

rafe
08-28-2015, 07:55
People die every year up on the Presidential range for failing to take the weather seriously. There was a rather infamous death just last winter... a fit young woman headed up Mt. Madison with a horrific storm brewing, and paid with her life. I'm sure it was discussed at great length right here on Whiteblaze.

rafe
08-28-2015, 10:02
Must be nice to have the option not to hike in the rain...on my whole thru hike there was only one time we even considered not going and it was above treeline in the Whites...every other place you will be fine.

Thru-hiking is hard core. Section hikers get more choices.

If you slogged over Franconia Ridge on a [email protected] viewless day -- and never came back to check it out -- I feel bad for you. That's the tragedy of thru-hiking, and even long section hikes (LASHs.) You mostly have to take whatever comes.

If I'm contemplating a two or three-night hike and it looks like [email protected] weather for the duration, I make new plans.

If I'm contemplating a winter day hike in the White Mountains, you better believe I pick and choose my weather.

Another Kevin
08-28-2015, 10:18
Thru-hiking is hard core. Section hikers get more choices.

If you slogged over Franconia Ridge on a [email protected] viewless day -- and never came back to check it out -- I feel bad for you. That's the tragedy of thru-hiking, and even long section hikes (LASHs.) You mostly have to take whatever comes.

If I'm contemplating a two or three-night hike and it looks like [email protected] weather for the duration, I make new plans.

If I'm contemplating a winter day hike in the White Mountains, you better believe I pick and choose my weather.

Weather Up North is serious business. My favorite approach to Slide Mountain in the Catskills is the Curtiss-Ormsbee Trail, named for the two hikers that laid it out, and subsequently perished in a blizzard in the Presidentials in June of 1900. (Yes, June. As the signs warn, people have frozen to death up there in every month of the year.) You do not take whatever comes above treeline, because some of what comes is not survivable.

I know that you, Rafe, know that, but I want to make sure it's communicated to those who may not. Even thru-hikers may have to hole up in Glencliff, Franconia, Pinkham Notch or Gorham for a few days if the weather takes a dangerous turn for the worse.

colorado_rob
08-28-2015, 10:22
Having grown up in the Pacific NW, we learned that if you want to do outdoor activities, you do them, weather be damned!
There is a strong sense of power in that attitude.

What I learned:

1) Some of the truly most amazing and spectacular views and scenes I have ever seen have been on trips where rotten weather was expected and/or had. There is a drama in dramatic weather that is unsurpassed and missed if one avoids that same dramatic weather due to fear of rain, wind, cold, or whatever.

2) Traveling in bad weather to the point of becoming confident in your skills at being reasonably comfortable and always safe enable more trips in more places during more spectacular and dramatic conditions.

3) Often bad weather just plain sucks and is miserable, and there isn't much of a good side except for the stories of suffering and misery you get to share with others when you get back . . . but, like beating your head against a wall, and then stopping, the next hike in good weather is all the more sweet due to the suffering of the past.

Hike far, hike often and hike free.Yep, true this. I like the saying: "There is no such thing as bad weather, only inadequate gear". the only thing that makes me turn around is lightning... not a whole lot of gear that can protect against that.... (portable faraday cage perhaps?)

Lnj
08-28-2015, 10:44
My take is to not let ANYTHING stop you, but it's totally okay to let your safety or your health delay you. Just give yourself plenty of time to stop and wait or to just barely crawl, whatever you need to do to stay the course and stay alive. No rush. No push. Plenty of options for hostels or hotels or whatever to wait out the worst of it and just keep moving when the sun pops back out.... or the ice melts a little.

Ender
08-28-2015, 11:18
The short answer to how I determine to hike when there's weather: Experience. Years of hiking has given the experience to have a good feeling of when/where to hike, and when/where not to.

Do I always get it right? Nope. But my success to failure ratio has got a lot better over the years. And I always, 100% of the time, will turn back if things get legitimately dodgy. Or hunker down... whatever makes the most sense at the time.

RE: Cheoah Bald... I camped up there on my thru. That evening it was gorgeous, with no hint of bad weather coming. Turns out, that night was one of the worst weather systems in that area that decade+, with tornadoes down in the valleys and a thunder and lightning storm on the mountain. Without question, the scariest moment of my hiking life, one of only a few times my life has ever been in actual, real, immediate danger.

rafe
08-28-2015, 11:25
Yep, true this. I like the saying: "There is no such thing as bad weather, only inadequate gear". the only thing that makes me turn around is lightning... not a whole lot of gear that can protect against that.... (portable faraday cage perhaps?)

Sadly, people die in the mountains, and it's not just lightning that does them in.

Flipping the bird at mother nature is asking for a kick in the butt, or worse.

AO2134
08-28-2015, 11:55
Erika looks like it will be hitting GA-NC-TN over labor day weekend. :(

colorado_rob
08-28-2015, 12:59
Sadly, people die in the mountains, and it's not just lightning that does them in.

Flipping the bird at mother nature is asking for a kick in the butt, or worse.I personally don't flip any birds at our great Mother, I embrace all she has in store for us with a big smile on my face, the right gear on my back and the right fitness and attitude. Enjoy your TV programs on those foul weather days!

rafe
08-28-2015, 13:47
Yep, there are certain adventure stories I'd rather read about or watch on TV than live through. My time is not so precious that I need to take undue risks with weather. Live to hike another day. Get laid up with an injury or pneumonia, you may get more rest-time than you bargained for.

I've done a bit of hiking in rain and mud this summer. Monadnock summit was amazingly raw and nasty in June. Hoping for better luck in September.

Traveler
08-28-2015, 13:58
I personally don't flip any birds at our great Mother, I embrace all she has in store for us with a big smile on my face, the right gear on my back and the right fitness and attitude. Enjoy your TV programs on those foul weather days!

Nice to know you don't deliberately ignore weather that will kill you and dare nature to do her worst, but I doubt Rafe is a fair weather hiker. As Rafe referenced, Kate Matrosova, a highly experienced mountaineer did just that last winter and paid for it with her life.

There are some weather events that should keep one hunkered down unless they are foolish. There are some substantial differences between a predicted day of showers and low pressure driven storms in winter. One can easily mitigate the showers, Kate Matrosova's found that a smile and jaunty tilt of the cap was not enough to save her life last winter. Lighting isn't the only force of nature that will kill you. To paraphrase an old axiom, its not that the mountains and forests are dangerous in and of themselves, they are simply intolerant of mistakes or carelessness.

colorado_rob
08-28-2015, 14:17
Nice to know you don't deliberately ignore weather that will kill you and dare nature to do her worst, but I doubt Rafe is a fair weather hiker. As Rafe referenced, Kate Matrosova, a highly experienced mountaineer did just that last winter and paid for it with her life.

There are some weather events that should keep one hunkered down unless they are foolish. There are some substantial differences between a predicted day of showers and low pressure driven storms in winter. One can easily mitigate the showers, Kate Matrosova's found that a smile and jaunty tilt of the cap was not enough to save her life last winter. Lighting isn't the only force of nature that will kill you. To paraphrase an old axiom, its not that the mountains and forests are dangerous in and of themselves, they are simply intolerant of mistakes or carelessness.We all have our own philosophies and experience levels (and I've climbed roughly 350 peaks all over the world, all successfully and all for the most part, safely), and Kate's death was tragic to be sure, but she could have been a bit more prepared than she was or made a better decision about turning around. I'm not against turning around when it really REALLY hits the fan, my main point is that usually you just don't know until you get up there what it will really be like. So sitting home watching weather reports and agonizing about whether it's "safe" out there is what I am against; grab the right gear and give her a go. I do realize that I have pushed it a bit now and then and that this does entail some level of risk. But very low risk if you're smart and geared correctly. Call me foolish! To some, I am (obviously you and Rafe, for example). To other's I'm actually on the conservative side. More so now approaching 60 really quickly...

And thank you for not quoting the stupid saying: "There are old mountaineers and there are bold mountaineers, but there are no old, bold mountaineers". I know a lot of old mountaineers, and every single one of them are also bold mountaineers! At least in their younger years, as I was at one time....

I can't tell you the number of times others around our climbing parties have forgone going for the summit while our party at least started up and feel things out, and lo-and-behold these times we climbed right out of the soup into a bluebird sky and summit success. Only a couple times have we started up in foul conditions and had to bail out.

Again, it's about individual philosophies. PLEASE please do NOT watch the documentary about Shane McConky!

rafe
08-28-2015, 14:31
Rob, have you heard of the Talus Monkey?

(Ref.: "Halfway to Heaven" by Mark Obmascik)

skater
08-28-2015, 18:46
Usually I just check to see if I have a pulse. Yep, good to go.

saltysack
08-28-2015, 20:50
Yep, true this. I like the saying: "There is no such thing as bad weather, only inadequate gear". the only thing that makes me turn around is lightning... not a whole lot of gear that can protect against that.... (portable faraday cage perhaps?)


I guess u could ground yourself with jumper cables...[emoji16]we used to clamp them on our metal t top on the boat and throw them over board to ground us when stuck out 60 miles offshore during a storm....pucker factor gets pretty high....not sure if really worked but made us feel lil safer...


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saltysack
08-28-2015, 20:52
Lil heavy though...[emoji482]


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Casey & Gina
08-29-2015, 02:19
Sadly, people die in the mountains, and it's not just lightning that does them in.

Flipping the bird at mother nature is asking for a kick in the butt, or worse.

To me it is not about flipping the bird at mother nature at all. I have camped through some truly vicious conditions and doubt I will stay indoors a single night on a thru hike. Sure something might make it happen, but I can confidently say it's unlikely. To me it is accepting my mortality and animal nature. Animals die in the wild every day and I am no different. I can take reasonable precautions to be safe and certainly have no desire to die, but if it happens, it happens, and I will have no regrets! It is a risk you take any time you leave modern comforts behind. It is a risk regardless - we are all mortal and anything can happen and end our lives at any time. Be respectful to nature but not afraid!

rafe
08-29-2015, 06:51
raptelan, if you manage that you will be a real macho man. Good luck with your planning.

SouthMark
08-29-2015, 07:26
When Pirate was asked if he hiked in the rain, his answer "not on purpose".

Casey & Gina
08-29-2015, 08:54
raptelan, if you manage that you will be a real macho man. Good luck with your planning.

??? I am not trying to be a "macho man" and doubt that my wife, who will be coming too, is trying to be either. We just love the outdoors and adventure. I didn't call you names - just expressed my perspective - so kindly treat me with the same respect.

Khike
08-29-2015, 08:55
Hello! If you hike the trail for long, it will rain. It has rained on every hike I made with a duration of 7-10 days. The great thing about rain is when it stops! Never slowed me down. I like weather, whatever kind. Yeah, being wet sucks, but if you're hiking you are usually warm. And hot food tastes good on a cold wet day. Heck, the last hike from Springer,north, I was dropped off in a downpour. I remember gearing up under the little gazebo thingy there and thinking, what the heck am I doing here, by myself. Started hiking and in 30 minutes , every thing was OK. I was where I belonged. Rained for 3 days. Made it all the way to Neal's Gap. And, all the hikers had a great time in camp, at the end of the day. My opinion/experience... Kevin

rafe
08-29-2015, 13:55
Raptelan, I was serious. To even express that as a goal is remarkable. If you succeed in that goal it would make you one in a thousand among thru hikers. Go for it.

Casey & Gina
08-29-2015, 19:02
Raptelan, I was serious. To even express that as a goal is remarkable. If you succeed in that goal it would make you one in a thousand among thru hikers. Go for it.

Okay, sorry I misunderstood! Maybe I am being naive and the trail will teach me some lessons (hah, I am sure it will do that in any case even if I succeed), but I will try!