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misterfloyd
08-26-2015, 18:33
If this is posted in the wrong section please move to footwear.

Since hiking this summer I have had problems with my left foot. I have been to 2 podiatrists. I have not been blessed with good genes footwise.

I live in an area this is slim pickings regarding podiatrists. None hike, I would be so lucky!! Has anyone, who has trouble with their feet, gone to a sports medicine doctor instead?

I have a basic mistrust when someone suggests the words operate. That is within reason of course.

Any information would be helpful and very welcome.

Floyd

Snowleopard
08-26-2015, 18:51
My guess is that a good podiatrist who is a runner or hiker would be better than a general sports medicine doc. I agree with avoiding surgery for more conservative treatment when possible.

Two places for recommendations for podiatrists in your area:
if there is a running club in your area, contact it and ask about podiatrists.
if you have a good running shoe store in your area ask there for recommendations.

Worse case scenario, if you live in a very remote area, consider looking for a recommendation in a major metropolitan area with a medical school or major hospitals (Raleigh-Durham??). You might have to go every 3 months for a few visits. I found my podiatrist when the doctor who diagnosed my bunion asked the nurses; one was a runner who had had a foot problem. My podiatrist is a trail runner/ultramarathoner and tries to keep people going in their chosen sport. Folks at a specialized running shoe store in western mass knew him and also recommended him.

misterfloyd
08-26-2015, 19:21
That is a great idea!

There must be nearby stores in Charlotte, NC. I will also call some running clubs.

I have always felt that all areas need to be explored regarding a condition and should not be the first line of course.

Thanks so much for the recommendations!!
Best,
Floyd

Vegan Packer
08-26-2015, 21:50
You should also look for a pedorthist that can make orthotics.

Traveler
08-27-2015, 07:58
If this is posted in the wrong section please move to footwear.

Since hiking this summer I have had problems with my left foot. I have been to 2 podiatrists. I have not been blessed with good genes footwise.

I live in an area this is slim pickings regarding podiatrists. None hike, I would be so lucky!! Has anyone, who has trouble with their feet, gone to a sports medicine doctor instead?

I have a basic mistrust when someone suggests the words operate. That is within reason of course.

Any information would be helpful and very welcome.

Floyd

You did not say what the problem was you were having and what the diagnosis you got and if the word "operate" was used. Do you have a neuroma, hammer toe, micro fracture(s), fallen arches, bunions, corns, toenail fungus, or loss of feeling/blood flow? There are a lot of things that can impact feet that do not necessarily need someone who is a hiker and a medical professional in combination.

If two podiatrists have given you a similar diagnosis, likely its what it is. Good ones will move to a conservative approach to allow self healing which can mean orthopedics designed to accommodate the problem or other non-invasive approach. Not many I have run across will move right to "operate" unless there is a specific issue that surgery is the only means to fix.

My orthopedic surgeon, who both hikes and does long distance running, referred me to the podiatrist I am using currently due to the highly specialized equipment and nature of the field. So my view is, a sport medicine MD will help with a lot of things like knees, ankles, stress fractures, corrective PT, and surgical options, but you are likely better off with a podiatrist for your feet.

Ktaadn
08-27-2015, 10:29
You should also look for a pedorthist that can make orthotics.

If you do this, it is guaranteed that they will try to sell you orthotics whether you need them or not.

misterfloyd
08-27-2015, 19:22
Guys thanks for all the input!

I had orthotics made a few years back. No problem with big cushiony NB tennis shoes I use to teach in. Big problem using them in my hing boots. used them last year from Fontana to erwin and ended up with a soft tissue bruise. I took them out when I got to Hot Springs but the damage was done.

I got two different diagnoses from these guys. My left foot is very flat and I was suggested that surgery would be in order to fuse two bones together otherwise they will continue to get flatter and it would be more painful. the person who made the orthos basically wanted to get an MRI if the pain continued.

This is the problem that I have. You know when I went to springer to fontana I had a pair of Keen Targhees, no ortho, or foot inserts, just one big protrusion where the bunion was at, but no problems at all. When they wore out I tried to replace them but the toe box kept bending where the seismic bone was at. Ouch.

I'm not looking for someone until I get the answer I want to hear, I just want the correct answer from someone I can trust.

Floyd

misterfloyd
08-27-2015, 19:23
By the way I'm only 49. I'm not ready fro this crap!

nsherry61
08-27-2015, 20:05
It looks like you might benefit from a combination of highly padded hiking footwear with appropriate, moderate arch support, with an aggressive reshaping of the shoe (cutting and/or stretching, etc.) to relieve bunion pressure.

Wise Old Owl
08-27-2015, 22:11
Well yes welcome to the club... its a wake up call. The fat between the toes is totally gone the big toe is sagging in an odd direction... even I cannot get a operation today to fix it. My Podiatrist and my Orthopedic Surgeon said well its not bad - live wit it. There is your sign.

get a few other opinions from a professional.. not an owl or poster.

Other wise... welcome to hiking slower. - enjoy the birds. It's all good.

PennyPincher
08-28-2015, 00:10
What is your "foot problem?" Many problems in the feet are actually caused by issues elsewhere.

Ktaadn
08-28-2015, 11:09
What is your "foot problem?" Many problems in the feet are actually caused by issues elsewhere.

This was sort of my question. Everyone is born with flat feet. It is your job to create the arch. Having surgery to fuse bones together to create an arch sounds crazy to me - assuming there isn't some other medical problem that you haven't mentioned. If you walk like a duck, you probably have flat feet. This leads to a lot of other issues.

Take a look at these:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nZ_b5TNIbPI&index=3&list=PLB67wXqPqtMfnHmTItAUtag4AqYwSVBh8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nntuDmKS6SM

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB67wXqPqtMfnHmTItAUtag4AqYwSVBh8

I would recommend these to anyone with knee issues too. I love the word navicular

Shutterbug
08-28-2015, 12:27
If this is posted in the wrong section please move to footwear.

Since hiking this summer I have had problems with my left foot. I have been to 2 podiatrists. I have not been blessed with good genes footwise.

I live in an area this is slim pickings regarding podiatrists. None hike, I would be so lucky!! Has anyone, who has trouble with their feet, gone to a sports medicine doctor instead?

I have a basic mistrust when someone suggests the words operate. That is within reason of course.

Any information would be helpful and very welcome.

Floyd

Everyone's situation is different, but I will share my story. I had severe pain in my feet. I went to a podiatrists who diagnosed "bone spur." I had an appointment with a surgeon when I tried a pair of Vibram FiveFinger Shoes. They completely solved the pain problem. I discovered that my pain was being caused by the raised heel in my boots. The FiveFinger Shoes don't have a raised heel. I now wear FiveFinger Shoes exclusively.

I am not suggesting that FiveFinger Shoes will solve your foot problems, but I am suggesting that experimenting with different kinds of shoes may help you discover what will work best for you. If you find something that is comfortable, stick with it.

Singto
08-28-2015, 12:48
Shutterbug's experience is a good example that doctors aren't always right. Go from simplest solution to most complex solution. Read: "Fixing Your Feet" and see if there's anything useful in this highly touted book.

misterfloyd
08-28-2015, 16:04
Thank you all for your help.

I was told by one that I have tendonitis in the Peroneus Brevis tendon. One told me that my feet will get flatter to the point of getting concave due to bone misalignment.

I agree that you start with the least invasive and work from there. The only answer that was suggested was that I needed stiffer soled boots.

I will look at the book as well as the links that you have all kindly given me.

I agree with the statement: doctors are not always right. I have seen this way too many times.

Thanks again
Floyd

Ercoupe
08-29-2015, 06:21
I have SESAMOIDITIS on the left foot, second toe. after two podiatrists , one who wanted to do surgery for the hammertoe, and felt padding for two years. I just cut a small hole under the affected area, in my boot and shoe inserts. Works for me. I would also concur with lower mileage, and time for the tendonitis to heal.

Traveler
08-29-2015, 07:15
I have SESAMOIDITIS on the left foot, second toe. after two podiatrists , one who wanted to do surgery for the hammertoe, and felt padding for two years. I just cut a small hole under the affected area, in my boot and shoe inserts. Works for me. I would also concur with lower mileage, and time for the tendonitis to heal.

Thats surprising, the two podiatrists I have seen for a similar hammer toe problem wanted to use a specially designed orthodox that provided a divot for the condition and increased arch support so I wouldn't change the way I walked to accommodate the condition. To this day I have used them with great success and don't notice the problem until I take my shoes off.

frontovik193
09-05-2015, 02:04
Hey folks, I was drawn to this thread due to a recent trip to the podiatrist. After years of being a line cook and working 8-14 hour days in cheap non-slip shoes + trying to live an active life style I have developed foot, ankle, and knee problems. My diagnosis was that I have high arches and lack of proper foot support, even in my hiking shoes. I am told that orthotics will solve all these problems, but before I drop the 350$ on a pair, do any of you have some input? I can see how they might work out for my job, but how do they work out for hiking? I too have some mistrust in diagnosis but do not want any risks. Best of luck with your feet Floyd.

Traveler
09-05-2015, 06:31
Hey folks, I was drawn to this thread due to a recent trip to the podiatrist. After years of being a line cook and working 8-14 hour days in cheap non-slip shoes + trying to live an active life style I have developed foot, ankle, and knee problems. My diagnosis was that I have high arches and lack of proper foot support, even in my hiking shoes. I am told that orthotics will solve all these problems, but before I drop the 350$ on a pair, do any of you have some input? I can see how they might work out for my job, but how do they work out for hiking? I too have some mistrust in diagnosis but do not want any risks. Best of luck with your feet Floyd.

In my experience, the use of prescribed orthotics helped me tremendously. I too balked at the cost (my insurance didn't cover them when I first got them years ago and still doesn't), however within minutes of putting them in the shoes my feet felt great again.

An Rx for orthotics may do the trick and is the least invasive of solutions for foot problems. Sounds like a lot of money, and it is, but how much would you spend to walk comfortably and without much/any pain?

greenmtnboy
09-05-2015, 09:07
I would not fool around with issues of the feet, work to become an expert on all the successful treatments of problem feet. Personally I have gravitated toward the best quality footwear, Limmer boots, superfeet insoles and merino wool socks when doing serious hiking. I only use natural footcare, hydrotherapy, ice for swelling etc. and essential oils like Tigerbalm rubbed on affected areas with a diet full of calcium as in organic yogurt and magnesium and other minerals to build the skeletal muscular system.

2000miler
09-06-2015, 14:15
Question to all you footcare experts!

I recently did a 6-day section hike of the PCT, and on that trip we pushed hard the first three days. Probably harder than we should have, given that we didn't have our trail legs yet. One member of our group is an ultramarathoner - lesson learned, don't let your ultramarathon friend set the hiking plan!

On the third day, I tweaked my left foot. I remember landing funny on a rock and rolling inward. It bugged me for the rest of the trip, not pain on the ankle, but on the outside edge of the foot, closer to midfoot.

It's now a week and a half later, and it still bugs me when I walk on it. I was afraid of a fracture, so I got an x-ray done this morning and it looks like I have calcification / bone spur at midfoot, near the pinky toe bone (that bone goes a lot farther back than I expected!). The extra bit of bone apparently has always been there, but when my foot swells, pressure hits the bit of bone and it hurts. Not good, as I know on a thru the feet tend to swell a lot.

Have any of you dealt with this type of injury before? Any podiatrists browsing this forum? All advice is welcome.

I plan on continuing to ice and rest and pop ibuprofen, and the doc advised me to do mobilization exercises after icing, and if the pain continued into next week, to seek a podiatrist for specialty help.

Worst of all, sounds like it'll always be there, so when I do big backpacking trips and my feet swell, the pain will almost always pop up. That's frustrating. Bad genetics, nothing I can do... just an extra bit of bone that will hurt when I backpack!

LittleRock
09-08-2015, 08:42
Welcome to the club. I'm not quite 30 and already have chronic Achilles tendonitis from years of running on hard surfaces and lingering ankle problems following bad sprains to each ankle (one several years ago and one earlier this year).

These injuries haven't kept me from running or hiking. Now I wear Gravity Defyer shoes with spring-loaded heels to absorb shock when running, and alternate between running and swimming to reduce impact on heels and ankles. I also carry KT tape hiking which helps whenever pain starts to flare up. Hiking poles are also very helpful for reducing impact on feet and knees and avoiding any more ankle sprains.