PDA

View Full Version : Gear List for AT : Seeing Input



Wingfield
09-10-2015, 21:32
hello all,

bit of a newbie here. I hiked around 25 years ago when I lived in CA; but mostly car camping since I've moved to TX. my brother and I are going to hike the AT when we retire (I realize some of you might just jump in and say why wait :>); but in the meantime we plan to do section hikes once per year. I've been putting together a gear list and I'd be interested in input from folks. I haven't gotten specific on everything yet; as it's just starting to take shape for me. so, here goes.

(a) is there anything obviously missing from the list? have I got it right? I realize this is subjective; and different folks feel the need for different items - but I welcome input.
(b) I have some lower back problems; but it's not a huge deal. that said, I'd like to keep the weight reasonable. I'm thinking 35# max, including food. will the ULA Circuit work for this? I'm also thinking about the GG Mariposa; but I'm not sure it's big enough. not sure if relevant; but I'm 50 and weigh 185#. my torso is around 20".
(c) most of the gear is generic at this point; but where I have specific gear listed - if anyone sees an issue with anything, or has comment, I'd appreciate it.
(d) I've read where getting the weight down is a good deal to do with the "big 3". I've already got a tent; but don't have a pack, or bag. actually, I do have a bag; but it's the 25 year old bag I used when I hiked in CA. It's a Kelty (20 degree) that weights 2.6#. I took it to REI and they said it would still work fine; but I'm thinking I can get the weight down on this by getting a new one???

the below link goes to my gear list. it's on google sheets. you can scroll down to see the entire list.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1AwBlC6TD_4fTraaKbcO2IBWCoj6hWGS6Xq7o9AdxGUI/pubhtml?gid=0&single=true

thank you everyone for your comments.

David

gbolt
09-11-2015, 21:32
Same story here but 5 years older. Looking to Retire in 2017 or 2018 and get started March of the following year.
Hold on purchasing the pack until last. Yes the Circuit will work and I was set to purchase one when I realized that the ULA Ohm 2.0 would work even better. I have been suprised that many times I don't even fill that pack to capacity. Your list looks similar to mine. A couple of fine tuning items such as the 25' of line may not be needed if your food sac is bought as part of a bear bag kit. I suggest Zpacks for that. For comparison sake... here is my google list:

https://docs.google.com/a/northmontschools.net/spreadsheets/d/1yn3HhUsxTSEHpkFhbHo8sRr9-jCgpDVR6MFnY_xNEkw/htmlview (https://docs.google.com/a/northmontschools.net/spreadsheets/d/1yn3HhUsxTSEHpkFhbHo8sRr9-jCgpDVR6MFnY_xNEkw/htmlview)

Hope my list helps... it actually list the items I have currently. Major difference is the Hammock Tarp vs. Tent but you get the idea. If I had gone with the original plan, I would have been in a Rainbow Tarp Tent and WM 20 Versalite (I think) sleeping bag.

Your list is great, now just adjust for personal fears as they say.

Kenai
09-12-2015, 19:22
I am also in the planning stages. My gear selections are similar, as well as my age. I think I am probably taking way too much stuff, and that after a couple of week long shakedown hikes, that I will lose at least another 5 pounds or more before I get to Springer, and will be bounce boxing some things north to Vermont, and sending other stuff home, or leaving it in a hiker box.
A more seasoned member of this forum gave me some great advice. Check out Andrew Skurka's blog, and Paul Magnati's, as well if you haven't already.
I was fortunate to find these resources, before I made any major purchases.
Attached are the links.

gbolt, I can't see your list. You have to grant permission to see it.


http://andrewskurka.com/blog/

http://www.pmags.com/

http://andrewskurka.com/2012/stupid-light-not-always-right-or-better/

bigcranky
09-13-2015, 09:00
Pack: We have three ULA Circuits in the house. I think mine was great right up to 30 pounds, but above that it got uncomfortable. After mine finally wore out (five years of hard use), I replaced it with a Zpacks Arc Haul, which is also great right up to 30 pounds, maybe slightly more.

If I were going to get a new ULA Circuit, I would get a custom pack with 100% Robic fabric, it weighs a couple of ounces more but should last longer. I also prefer the stretchy front pocket from the ULA Ohm, which is available as an option. (Or at least it was available when I got the pack.) ULA makes very good packs.

Sleeping Bag: You can save a little bit of weight with a high quality down bag, but the good ones rated to 20F (that will actually keep you warm at 20F) mostly weigh close to 2 pounds. A 20F rated quilt from someplace like Enlightened Equipment can save some weight. Make sure your sleeping pad is warm enough -- that's one major component of being warm at night. My wife has a NeoAir XTherm and loves it, though I think it cost as much as her first car. :) (Old people joke.)

Tent: It's a very nice tent, but you could cut the weight almost in half with something like a Tarptent Notch. But you have several years to figure all this out, and your gear will change with every hike.

The nice thing about doing yearly section hikes is that they give you a great way to dial in your gear and technique before a thru-hike. Good luck with the planning and the hiking. :)

gbolt
09-13-2015, 11:42
gbolt, I can't see your list. You have to grant permission to see it.



Sorry about that... I thought it was set for those that have the link to view but doesn't seem to work. The OP sent an email so hopefully he has it now. Your links are great, so I thought I would add one that served as the skeleton that I started from:

http://www.backpacker.com/trips/georgia/pack-man-the-appalachian-trail-guru/4/#bp=0/img1

He no longer owns Moutain Crossings but the information is somewhat timeless.

Wingfield
09-13-2015, 17:43
Same story here but 5 years older. Looking to Retire in 2017 or 2018 and get started March of the following year.
Hold on purchasing the pack until last. Yes the Circuit will work and I was set to purchase one when I realized that the ULA Ohm 2.0 would work even better. I have been suprised that many times I don't even fill that pack to capacity. Your list looks similar to mine. A couple of fine tuning items such as the 25' of line may not be needed if your food sac is bought as part of a bear bag kit. I suggest Zpacks for that. For comparison sake... here is my google list:

https://docs.google.com/a/northmontschools.net/spreadsheets/d/1yn3HhUsxTSEHpkFhbHo8sRr9-jCgpDVR6MFnY_xNEkw/htmlview (https://docs.google.com/a/northmontschools.net/spreadsheets/d/1yn3HhUsxTSEHpkFhbHo8sRr9-jCgpDVR6MFnY_xNEkw/htmlview)

Hope my list helps... it actually list the items I have currently. Major difference is the Hammock Tarp vs. Tent but you get the idea. If I had gone with the original plan, I would have been in a Rainbow Tarp Tent and WM 20 Versalite (I think) sleeping bag.

Your list is great, now just adjust for personal fears as they say.

Gbolt,

thank you for sharing your list. you're right, lots of similarities. I thought about a hammock, and seriously thought about it. my thoughts are that hammocks aren't for amateurs, and that's certainly where I fall. how do you deal with rain? what if you're above the tree line?

you're more dialed in on your clothing, so I got some good ideas there. thank you.

fastfoxengineering
09-13-2015, 18:43
You will probably soon realize your carrying more stuff than you care for. That's fine, the only way to know what to ditch is to spend some time on the trail. Don't be afraid to send something home if you never use it.

You have everything you need, now get out there and hike!

Wingfield
09-13-2015, 20:05
I am also in the planning stages. My gear selections are similar, as well as my age. I think I am probably taking way too much stuff, and that after a couple of week long shakedown hikes, that I will lose at least another 5 pounds or more before I get to Springer, and will be bounce boxing some things north to Vermont, and sending other stuff home, or leaving it in a hiker box.
A more seasoned member of this forum gave me some great advice. Check out Andrew Skurka's blog, and Paul Magnati's, as well if you haven't already.
I was fortunate to find these resources, before I made any major purchases.
Attached are the links.

gbolt, I can't see your list. You have to grant permission to see it.


http://andrewskurka.com/blog/

http://www.pmags.com/

http://andrewskurka.com/2012/stupid-light-not-always-right-or-better/



thank you for the links Kenai!!!

Wingfield
09-13-2015, 20:16
Pack: We have three ULA Circuits in the house. I think mine was great right up to 30 pounds, but above that it got uncomfortable. After mine finally wore out (five years of hard use), I replaced it with a Zpacks Arc Haul, which is also great right up to 30 pounds, maybe slightly more.

If I were going to get a new ULA Circuit, I would get a custom pack with 100% Robic fabric, it weighs a couple of ounces more but should last longer. I also prefer the stretchy front pocket from the ULA Ohm, which is available as an option. (Or at least it was available when I got the pack.) ULA makes very good packs.

Sleeping Bag: You can save a little bit of weight with a high quality down bag, but the good ones rated to 20F (that will actually keep you warm at 20F) mostly weigh close to 2 pounds. A 20F rated quilt from someplace like Enlightened Equipment can save some weight. Make sure your sleeping pad is warm enough -- that's one major component of being warm at night. My wife has a NeoAir XTherm and loves it, though I think it cost as much as her first car. :) (Old people joke.)

Tent: It's a very nice tent, but you could cut the weight almost in half with something like a Tarptent Notch. But you have several years to figure all this out, and your gear will change with every hike.

The nice thing about doing yearly section hikes is that they give you a great way to dial in your gear and technique before a thru-hike. Good luck with the planning and the hiking. :)


Hey Ken,

thank you for confirming my choice on pack. looking forward to hiking with the Circuit.

question for you. the Notch is not free standing. how do you handle rain? I realize my tent is twice as heavy. largely, I have this tent to accomodate hikes with my boy recognizing that I can go lighter down the road. that said, I can set up the fly on a tyvek footprint, then put my tent up underneath and this handles setting up in the rain.

thank you for the comments.

David

Kenai
09-13-2015, 20:21
Sorry about that... I thought it was set for those that have the link to view but doesn't seem to work. The OP sent an email so hopefully he has it now. Your links are great, so I thought I would add one that served as the skeleton that I started from:

http://www.backpacker.com/trips/georgia/pack-man-the-appalachian-trail-guru/4/#bp=0/img1

He no longer owns Moutain Crossings but the information is somewhat timeless.


Great article. Thanks gbolt.

Wingfield
09-13-2015, 20:48
ah, answered my own question. you can pitch the fly first.

Venchka
09-13-2015, 21:50
ah, answered my own question. you can pitch the fly first.

Actually, TarpTents go up as a unit. Fly and body connected. Interior stays dry.
Why don't you "practice" closer to home? The Ouachita Trail, Big Bend NP or State Park come to mind. Cut your travel time down and get more hiking time.
Good luck.

Wayne


Sent from somewhere around here.

gbolt
09-13-2015, 23:28
Gbolt,

thank you for sharing your list. you're right, lots of similarities. I thought about a hammock, and seriously thought about it. my thoughts are that hammocks aren't for amateurs, and that's certainly where I fall. how do you deal with rain? what if you're above the tree line?

I was all set for a Henry Shire Rainbow Tarp Tent to replace my 5# Eureka two man tent. Then I realized hammocks aren't for amateurs but for older guys that shouldn't sleep on the ground. I purchased one book, watched a lot of video's, went to Warbonnet's site and within 4 months of winter, I purchased the hammock. 1st night of sleep was sooooo comfortable... I hate to go to the ground now. I don't plan on sleeping above treeline and if I ever choose too, the Tarp with Trekking Poles and possibly a light weight bivy ontop of my Therm-a-rest Z pad, I sometimes carry instead of or in addition to a Under Quilt, will work great.

The clothing is only dialed in from the Pack Man article. However, it is the one catagory that I am constantly changing and rearranging on day hikes, especially in the winter time. I probably carry a little more than needed. Yet, I would rather carry one two many layers, or one unnecessary item like, a wind shirt, than to be too cold.

Keep reading and researching... I enjoy the off trail till I can get back on the trail.

Wingfield
09-15-2015, 22:23
Actually, TarpTents go up as a unit. Fly and body connected. Interior stays dry.
Why don't you "practice" closer to home? The Ouachita Trail, Big Bend NP or State Park come to mind. Cut your travel time down and get more hiking time.
Good luck.

Wayne


Sent from somewhere around here.

Wayne,

closer to home is a good thought. I appreciate it. my father is from Arkansas, so that has some appeal to me. thank you.

Kenai
09-16-2015, 00:01
thank you for the links Kenai!!!

My pleasure. Seems like we are all in the same boat here. Maybe by the time we are ready, we will have a good portion of the gear selection issues ironed out.

Venchka
09-16-2015, 20:42
Wayne,

closer to home is a good thought. I appreciate it. my father is from Arkansas, so that has some appeal to me. thank you.

You're welcome. Next year I hope to be on the trail, any trail, more than I have been for too many years. Perhaps we could plan a trip together.
Good luck.

Wayne


Sent from somewhere around here.

v1k1ng1001
09-19-2015, 20:33
ULA circuit is the only pack I currently own. I chose it over the OHM for increased versatility...can carry 35+lbs fairly well although I usually carry 20-25 max.

Fwiw, I much prefer these socks across the board which are normally $20 new, but $6 now on STP: http://www.sierratradingpost.com/icebreaker-hike-lite-socks-merino-wool-crew-for-men~p~8713j/

Instead of carrying/wearing a standard bandana, I carry this which doubles as my camp towel: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00EM6INF2

I wear these boxers daily during the summer and prefer them to underarmor: http://www.sierratradingpost.com/exofficio-boxer-shorts-underwear-for-men~p~6488t/

I use this for my food hangs (buy the size you think you will need): http://www.amazon.com/Outdoor-Research-Ultralight-10-Liter-Alloy/dp/B00ATNIGKO/

I keep it simple/cheap with Toaks pots: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009B98FGW

For water, I either use Platypus bladders or smart water bottles...both are light...the latter work well with the sawyer filter and are recycling freebies.

Consider bug proofing your clothing: http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-Permethrin-Clothing-Repellent/dp/B001ANQVYU/

Some other pieces I've had success with:

http://www.amazon.com/Outdoor-Research-Spectrum-Sleeves-X-Large/dp/B008JH10R8/
http://www.amazon.com/Outdoor-Research-T-Shirt-Pewter-Alloy/dp/B008JHZVKA/
http://www.amazon.com/Icebreaker-Everyday-Sleeve-Crewe-Medium/dp/B00AF6ZK6I/
http://www.sierratradingpost.com/icebreaker-everyday-bodyfit-200-base-layer-bottoms-lightweight-merino-wool-for-men~p~7511p/

I love Prana's zion shorts and pants the most. My Kuhl guide pants (fall) and north face convertible pants (summer) have been ok.

You could go lighter with your tent...but that's up to you: http://www.sixmoondesigns.com/tents/LunarDuo.html
http://www.lightheartgear.com/index.php/tents/lightheart-duo-tents

Hope those odds and ends help.