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mcnuggets
11-30-2005, 20:35
I'm going to attempt thru hiking NOBO on the AT beginning in the first (or possibly the second) week of March. I'm going to make a purchase soon on campmor.com and would like some feedback. Here's my tentative list. No clothing on it as of yet.

Bag:
North Face Blue Kazoo 20 Long Down Sleeping Bag
$159.97
3#2oz

Tent:
Sierra Designs Mach 1 Tent - 2005
$179.96
3#15oz

Mattress:
Therm-a-Rest Z-Lite Regular
$34.95
15oz

Pack:
Dana Designs Glacier L/XL
5#13oz.
(*I already bought this item. I saw it on eBay and decided to take the plunge. In hindsight I realize this was a mistake. Although the pack does fit when loaded up with ~30#'s I realize that it is probably overkill in terms of volume. I'm not sure if I should try to sell this pack and go for something lighter and smaller or just use this. I intend on carrying on average 4-5 days of food after each resupply [I have a limited budget and don't want to spend much time in town] so the extra volume would be appreciated.*)

Bag Liner:
Cocoon 100% Silk MummyLiner
$39.97
5oz.

Multi-Tool/Knife:
Leatherman Micra
$19.99
1.5oz

Light:
Black Diamond Moonlight II Headlamp
$29.99
3.2oz

Stove:
Pepsi Can Stove
Free
~1oz

Pot:
Not marijuana unfortunately ;)
Cheapie Walmart Al Pot
~$5
~8-12oz?

Utensils:
Lexan Spork
~$2
0.5oz

So what do you guys think? A very tentative list at the moment. Any feedback would very much be appreciated. Have a good one.

Tom

SGT Rock
11-30-2005, 20:47
Actually it looks pretty good. One thing to possibly look at is changing the sleeping bag to a Campmor 20F down bag which would be lighter, but you may need that extra length of the Blue Kazoo.

IMO sporks are worthles as a fork or a spoon. Just get a spoon. If you ever need a fork, you could make chopsticks with your knife to do the same thing and toss them when you are finished.

justusryans
11-30-2005, 20:48
looks decent! tent looks a little heavy though, for what your paying.

SGT Rock
11-30-2005, 21:20
You can get that same tent for $20 less at REI outlet http://www.rei.com/outlet/product/48017996.htm

Or you could get this one for about the same price you plan to spend for about a half a pound lighter. http://www.rei.com/outlet/product/47997456.htm?vcat=OUTLET_SSHP_CAMPING_HIKING_SA

Whistler
11-30-2005, 21:21
Looks like you're on the right track. I would recommend not buying the silk liner, headlamp, or knife. I would reinvest that $90 or so in either your sleeping bag [then you could get a really sweet, light bag] or your tent [look at something like Tarptent or Six Moon Designs]. Switching to a foam pad could also save you about $20, but that depends on your comfort needs. You can probably find a small pocketknife for cheap at a hardware store or a thrift store or in your grandparents' house [My grandpa is a generous packrat :)]. For the headlamp, something like a Princeton Tec Scout could get the job done. Of course, wait for sales over the next 3-4 months, and you can think about a new pack as the months go by and the rest of your gear is figured out.
-Mark

Bjorkin
12-01-2005, 00:05
I think you could shave a good 2-3 lbs. off that pack weight alone. It may be a pain now since you just bought yours, but better a pain in effort now than a much bigger pain on the trail with that extra weight. Granite Gear makes sweet 2-3 lb. packs.

Also, you could cut your pot weight in half by going titanium. Pricey i know, but that 8-10 ozs for a pot really stands out.

Looks like a great start though.

mcnuggets
12-01-2005, 00:27
SgtRock,
I'm going to switch to the campmor bag. I'm 6'2" and I'm sure the long version can accomdate me. It says that it's 6'6" long. The spoon sounds like a good idea too.

Whistler,
I'm liking that Six Moon Designs Lunar. I think I'm going to ditch the tent and get that. It's way too heavy. I'm going to go with a lighter headlamp also. As far as the silk liner is concerned I'm worried that a 20 bag is going to get too hot in the summer time and I'm going to eaten alive if I sleep with it open.

mcnuggets
12-01-2005, 00:37
It's a nice pack. I don't know. If anything I'm sure I can replace it at an outfitter along the trail. Titanium is expensive. I might go for it though.

Just Jeff
12-01-2005, 00:41
The Walmart Grease Pot weighs 2.5 oz plus 1.75 for the lid. A Heineken pot weighs .75 oz. If you're trying to save money, I don't think a $$$ titanium pot is worth knocking off an ounce. JMHO. But then, I use a JetBoil now.

I'd second what the other folks said about the pack. But as long as you're comfortable in it, that's the important thing.

Lone Star
12-01-2005, 13:33
I used the campmor 20* long and was fine in it (I'm 6'3"), in hindsight I would have switched for just a light blanket during the warm months. I carried the Six Moon Designs Europa and was very happy with it, especially during buggy times, never had a problem with them getting in so I could have had an open blanket.

general
12-01-2005, 13:49
i've been using a dana arclight glacier for well over 10 years (with some repair) and have absolutely nothing but good things to say about it. you can carry a bunch of weight. i just got a mystery ranch deep trance and have even better things to say about it though. it's a little smaller and very comfortable with the lumbar support. the deep trance is rated for 40lb or less, but i've had as much as 57 in mine and it felt like 40.

don't like North Face due to bad experience with customer service and leaky rain fly. they told me that they could water test it and get it back to me in 4 to 6 months. ditched it and bought a sil/nylon 5x9 tarp for 50 bucks and have been perfectly dry ever since.

mcnuggets
12-01-2005, 14:33
I'm wondering if I should get trekking poles or not. I figure I'll be carrying ~35# and I'm relatively tall so it might save me from injury. But I don't know if they're worth the weight.

greaver
12-01-2005, 14:42
Get the poles BEFORE you need them. There are some serious downhill sections throughout the trail. I started out without poles but soon switched. It was a bit awkward at fist but I'm glad I didn't wait until my knees were shot and my hike was ruined. They're also great for river crossings and a few other things. JMHO.

mcnuggets
12-01-2005, 14:44
OK, nice. Would you say I can get away with something like this?:

http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=21854782&memberId=12500226

Are the higher priced poles worth the added cost?

greaver
12-01-2005, 14:45
The mummy liner might also help too preserve your sleeping bag. My bag got pretty rank by the end of the trail.

I used the leatherman micra too. It was small and useful in a pinch.

What are you using for water storage/treatment?

mcnuggets
12-01-2005, 14:50
For water I'm thinking of getting a 32oz nalgene, 20oz gatorade bottle and a 3 or 4L collapsible platypus. I sweat like a beast and could use the added capacity at camp. The nalgene can also double as a mug for coffee I'm guessing. For treatment I'm thinking of just taking AquaMira. I'm allergic to shellfish and am worried about taking water treated with KI.

The Solemates
12-01-2005, 14:51
the sleeping bag sure is heavy. i would shoot for something well under 2llbs.

the tent also seems heavy for a 1 man. i have a 2-man tent that weighs less than that. i would shoot for something under 3lbs.

you do not need the liner if you have a 20 deg bag.

you do not need the microtool. i didnt even carry a knife at all on my thru.

the pack is heavy, yes, and big, yes. but since you already bought it, its a hard call. perhaps try to sell it and use the money for the liner and microtool to purchase a lighter pack.

The Solemates
12-01-2005, 14:53
For water I'm thinking of getting a 32oz nalgene, 20oz gatorade bottle and a 3 or 4L collapsible platypus. I sweat like a beast and could use the added capacity at camp. The nalgene can also double as a mug for coffee I'm guessing. For treatment I'm thinking of just taking AquaMira. I'm allergic to shellfish and am worried about taking water treated with KI.

a 1L pepsi container and a 2L platypus is all i carry and its plenty. if you really need more in camp, you can always just fill up your pot and/or mug too.

The Solemates
12-01-2005, 14:54
oh, and if you really want trekking poles (which I dont think you do), buy a couple old recycled ski poles for $5 or carve your own.

mcnuggets
12-01-2005, 14:55
OK that sounds good. I'm going to keep the nalgene because I need something for hot liquids. I'll step down the platypus to 2L.

What would you recommend as far as a sleeping bag goes? I'm going to be starting in early March and don't want to freeze. I'm also thinking about getting a cheap space blanket that can double as my groundsheet.

Lone Wolf
12-01-2005, 14:57
Start the hike without hiking poles. You can get them later on if you think you need them.

rickb
12-01-2005, 15:01
The nalgene can also double as a mug for coffee I'm guessing

Me thinks its time for a pole! Hopefully, I won't screw it up.

The Solemates
12-01-2005, 15:12
Start the hike without hiking poles. You can get them later on if you think you need them.

excellent advice.

The Solemates
12-01-2005, 15:19
OK that sounds good. I'm going to keep the nalgene because I need something for hot liquids. I'll step down the platypus to 2L.

What would you recommend as far as a sleeping bag goes? I'm going to be starting in early March and don't want to freeze. I'm also thinking about getting a cheap space blanket that can double as my groundsheet.

a nalgene will work just fine, but i have personally found that an insulated cheap mug works better. my kitchen looks like this: pot, lexan spoon, insulated mug, 1L pepsi bottle, 2L platypus.

as far as sleeping bags, there are a million to chose from and it is hard to say. i would definitely go with a 20 deg bag. many people like western mountaineering bags, but they are very expensive. i know you can find good bags on campmor for relatively cheap for around 2lbs. kelty also makes some for inexpensive. the north face cats meow is an old standard, although many are deviating from that nowadays. i have 3 bags, but i have a 30 deg mountainsmith wisp that weighs only 21oz that i take down to about 20 deg, and which i would take for a mid-march start on the AT...i just add more clothing and a hat for warmth, and sleep in a tent, which is warmer. but, i am a warm sleeper, and often snuggle with my wife, and i would still recommend a 20 deg bag for most people. do a search here for specific bags. they have been discussed extensively.

general
12-01-2005, 15:37
OK that sounds good. I'm going to keep the nalgene because I need something for hot liquids. I'll step down the platypus to 2L.

What would you recommend as far as a sleeping bag goes? I'm going to be starting in early March and don't want to freeze. I'm also thinking about getting a cheap space blanket that can double as my groundsheet.

tyvek for a ground sheet or a piece of 6mil plastic.

The Solemates
12-01-2005, 16:58
tyvek for a ground sheet or a piece of 6mil plastic.

id say 6 mil is overkill, and im still not convinced with tyvek's long term waterproofness. my groundsheet is 2mil painters plastic. works great and only weighs a couple ounces.

general
12-01-2005, 17:23
id say 6 mil is overkill, and im still not convinced with tyvek's long term waterproofness. my groundsheet is 2mil painters plastic. works great and only weighs a couple ounces.

your're right, 6mil is pretty heavy and would out live cock roaches.

tyvek, however, can be found at most outfitters now and is so cheap ya can just toss it and grab another piece when it wears out. there was once a hiker named tyvek. everything he had was tyvek and seemed to work.

Burn
12-03-2005, 13:23
if you hammock, you won't need a ground sheet... the only thing i see wrong is that it's yer gear list and not mine, and yer going hiking and i'm not.

enjoy