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Pots
10-15-2015, 22:30
Here is my current pack: http://lighterpack.com/r/3x98vi

I'm starting in mid-late February. If you have any recommendations or things I forgot please feel free to tell me!

bigcranky
10-16-2015, 06:51
I'm just going down your list. Pack, sleeping bag and tent are fine. I would find the Z-lite way too cold in the winter, the R-value is only 2.6.

Why carry the multitool? I carried one for years until I realized that I wan't carrying anything that I could fix with a screwdriver, etc. Now I carry a tiny folding knife.

Rain shells: 2 thoughts, why purchase two different Goretex jackets that are almost the same weight? The lighter one looks fine. You'll want the rain shell and pants through the end of April, maybe longer, see what happens on the trail.

The gaiters may help in deep snow in the Smokies, but you won't need them later in the hike.

Red Ledge rain pants - same thoughts, you only need one set of rain gear.

I don't see any kind of warm layer. It's going to be very cold, most hikers have a puffy jacket of some sort, and midweight long johns top and bottom for sleeping.

Flip flops - great as summertime camp shoes, not real useful in cold weather (hard to wear with socks).

That towel seems awfully heavy, I need to weigh mine. It is possible to take a shower with a small bandana-size pack towel. (And anyway most hostels and all hotels have towels.)

Cook set is fine but I didn't see a stove. Make sure the Sawyer doesn't freeze - keep it in your bag at night, and protect it during very cold days.

Your mom doesn't have to carry your "tactical knife". :) There's not much need out there for one of these. (Yeah, I carried a big knife for a long time, finally realized the only thing I ever used it for was to slice cheese.)

Good luck.

Venchka
10-16-2015, 08:57
OK, I'm a Clueless Geezer with a rag tag assortment of relics from the 1970s, 80s, 90s & this decade.
My newest gear was assembled in 2014 & 2015, a totally new sleeping system consisting of:
Xtherm Large R-5.7. I got tired of not sleeping well on the ground. The Xtherm solved that problem.
Exped Air Pillow. Works perfectly for me. It may not work for anyone else. That don't confront me.
2 straight months sleeping on the floor on the Xtherm & Exped pillow proved their value.
Western Mountaineering Alpinlite sleeping bag. Enough said.
All of the above, plus my wee Bombshelter Garuda tent loaded in my Rivendell Jensen back pack weighs the same as your sleep system, tent & pack. I trust my stuff. I'm not at all sure about your stuff.
For a February start, I would swap out the Alpinlite for my WM Antelope Dry Loft bag. It's heavy as lead (but lighter than your bag) and I KNOW it works at 0F inside my stormproof tent. Maybe colder with the right layers on me and a couple of bottles of hot water.
If Mom is concerned about your safety, ask her to trade the knife, bag and foam pad for a proper sleep system and clothes for winter in the mountains. You live in Connecticut. You know what winter is. You need the same gear on the AT as you would sleeping in your backyard in February. I know. I spent 5 winters in Massachusetts upriver from Hartford.
I know I sound harsh. Mother Nature can be ruthlessly harsh. I'm just trying to open your eyes to what you're getting yourself into.
By the way, assuming your bag's temperature rating is close to accurate, that temperature rating was measured on an R-5 pad. Anything less means your bag won't be comfortable at the low end of it's rating.
One more thing, and this is a gripe I have about a lot of bag makers and their internet information: Never, never ever buy a sleeping bag without knowing the claimed loft of the bag and the quantity of down stuffed in it. I don't see either of those facts on The North Face web page. And why do they claim comfort below zero and only rate the bag at 5F?
By all means, have a great hike. Get your gear dialed in and tested in New England by New Year's. You don't want any rude surprises on the AT in February.

Gaiters are useless for stream crossings.


Wayne

bigcranky
10-16-2015, 11:34
Hey, Wayne, the kid's 17 and doesn't derserve a rant, man. Too much coffee this morning, or not enough? :)

Pots
10-16-2015, 13:45
OK, I'm a Clueless Geezer with a rag tag assortment of relics from the 1970s, 80s, 90s & this decade.
My newest gear was assembled in 2014 & 2015, a totally new sleeping system consisting of:
Xtherm Large R-5.7. I got tired of not sleeping well on the ground. The Xtherm solved that problem.
Exped Air Pillow. Works perfectly for me. It may not work for anyone else. That don't confront me.
2 straight months sleeping on the floor on the Xtherm & Exped pillow proved their value.
Western Mountaineering Alpinlite sleeping bag. Enough said.
All of the above, plus my wee Bombshelter Garuda tent loaded in my Rivendell Jensen back pack weighs the same as your sleep system, tent & pack. I trust my stuff. I'm not at all sure about your stuff.
For a February start, I would swap out the Alpinlite for my WM Antelope Dry Loft bag. It's heavy as lead (but lighter than your bag) and I KNOW it works at 0F inside my stormproof tent. Maybe colder with the right layers on me and a couple of bottles of hot water.
If Mom is concerned about your safety, ask her to trade the knife, bag and foam pad for a proper sleep system and clothes for winter in the mountains. You live in Connecticut. You know what winter is. You need the same gear on the AT as you would sleeping in your backyard in February. I know. I spent 5 winters in Massachusetts upriver from Hartford.
I know I sound harsh. Mother Nature can be ruthlessly harsh. I'm just trying to open your eyes to what you're getting yourself into.
By the way, assuming your bag's temperature rating is close to accurate, that temperature rating was measured on an R-5 pad. Anything less means your bag won't be comfortable at the low end of it's rating.
One more thing, and this is a gripe I have about a lot of bag makers and their internet information: Never, never ever buy a sleeping bag without knowing the claimed loft of the bag and the quantity of down stuffed in it. I don't see either of those facts on The North Face web page. And why do they claim comfort below zero and only rate the bag at 5F?
By all means, have a great hike. Get your gear dialed in and tested in New England by New Year's. You don't want any rude surprises on the AT in February.

Gaiters are useless for stream crossings.


Wayne
This is very informative. I totally understand- I have a lot of work to do and perfect. I need to learn! It's good to know the different things I must look for. I would totally go with the bag you are suggesting but I do not have the funds to afford it. Same goes with Xtherm, I don't think I have the money. I can probably do a $350 bag tops and a $100 pad.

And that didn't sound harsh at all. I will keep looking for a bag based off what you said- and also a pad.


I'm just going down your list. Pack, sleeping bag and tent are fine. I would find the Z-lite way too cold in the winter, the R-value is only 2.6.

Why carry the multitool? I carried one for years until I realized that I wan't carrying anything that I could fix with a screwdriver, etc. Now I carry a tiny folding knife.

Rain shells: 2 thoughts, why purchase two different Goretex jackets that are almost the same weight? The lighter one looks fine. You'll want the rain shell and pants through the end of April, maybe longer, see what happens on the trail.

The gaiters may help in deep snow in the Smokies, but you won't need them later in the hike.

Red Ledge rain pants - same thoughts, you only need one set of rain gear.

I don't see any kind of warm layer. It's going to be very cold, most hikers have a puffy jacket of some sort, and midweight long johns top and bottom for sleeping.

Flip flops - great as summertime camp shoes, not real useful in cold weather (hard to wear with socks).

That towel seems awfully heavy, I need to weigh mine. It is possible to take a shower with a small bandana-size pack towel. (And anyway most hostels and all hotels have towels.)

Cook set is fine but I didn't see a stove. Make sure the Sawyer doesn't freeze - keep it in your bag at night, and protect it during very cold days.

Your mom doesn't have to carry your "tactical knife". :) There's not much need out there for one of these. (Yeah, I carried a big knife for a long time, finally realized the only thing I ever used it for was to slice cheese.)

Good luck.
Yep- pad will be replaced off what I have heard. And yeah I've been rethinking the jackets. I'll replace one of them with a puff jacket and add in some layered pants. I don't even cook at home so I don't know what I would be cooking in the hills. I am almost always eating cereal and cliff bars haha. That is my thought process, if I end up needing one I can probably pick one up. I have read up on the sawyer and probably will keep it somewhere against my body at all times.

Flip flops are for spring, and I sadly can not leave the knife behind, maybe I'll just trash it in springer! haha.

I'll see about the multitool also. But I will probably start with it.

Water Rat
10-16-2015, 15:18
Just something to think about... While you might not cook, having a stove to heat water for a hot drink on a cold day does wonders for you psychologically and physically. It can also be used to heat a water bottle to sleep with on the really cold nights.

Good luck and have fun! :)

4eyedbuzzard
10-16-2015, 15:38
Lots of good points already mentioned that I won't repeat. I might be too old school, but I always carry 3 pairs of socks, not 2, especially in colder conditions. One on my feet, one drying/hung on pack, and a dry pair for sleeping in and then wearing the next day. At camp, I rinse out or wash the ones I wore that day, which become the pair drying out. Sometimes they dry overnight, sometimes they become the pair still drying. Drying socks might prove difficult in February, but having a spare dry pair might be really nice. If they are just a bit damp still, wrap them around some hot water in your bottle and bring them in your sleeping bag with you. That and your body heat will help them dry out overnight.

Venchka
10-16-2015, 16:32
I have a granddaughter who is 18 today. She spends a lot of time in the at Grayson Highlands every summer. I try to teach her what little bit I know. So she will be safe.
That is what Grandfather's do. Consider my earlier rant some well intended Grandfatherly advice.
Stay dry. Stay warm. You'll be fine.
Please carry a stove. There are very light, very inexpensive titanium stoves available from Amazon or maybe ebay. You can find several threads about them here at WhiteBlaze. One of those and a 100 gram gas canister could very well save your bacon.

Wayne

Pots
10-16-2015, 18:30
Just something to think about... While you might not cook, having a stove to heat water for a hot drink on a cold day does wonders for you psychologically and physically. It can also be used to heat a water bottle to sleep with on the really cold nights.

Good luck and have fun! :)

I have a granddaughter who is 18 today. She spends a lot of time in the at Grayson Highlands every summer. I try to teach her what little bit I know. So she will be safe.
That is what Grandfather's do. Consider my earlier rant some well intended Grandfatherly advice.
Stay dry. Stay warm. You'll be fine.
Please carry a stove. There are very light, very inexpensive titanium stoves available from Amazon or maybe ebay. You can find several threads about them here at WhiteBlaze. One of those and a 100 gram gas canister could very well save your bacon.

Wayne
Sounds like an investment worth making. Thanks guys :)


Lots of good points already mentioned that I won't repeat. I might be too old school, but I always carry 3 pairs of socks, not 2, especially in colder conditions. One on my feet, one drying/hung on pack, and a dry pair for sleeping in and then wearing the next day. At camp, I rinse out or wash the ones I wore that day, which become the pair drying out. Sometimes they dry overnight, sometimes they become the pair still drying. Drying socks might prove difficult in February, but having a spare dry pair might be really nice. If they are just a bit damp still, wrap them around some hot water in your bottle and bring them in your sleeping bag with you. That and your body heat will help them dry out overnight.
Very true and they aren't too heavy. Something to definitely consider.

bigcranky
10-16-2015, 21:29
You're starting in winter, you need hot food and drinks. It'll be very cold, and hot food is a good way to warm up after a tough day on the trail. Hot drinks are an excellent way to go to bed warm, too.

I skip the stove in the summer and survive on cold food just fine, but not in the winter.

Pots
10-16-2015, 21:59
You're starting in winter, you need hot food and drinks. It'll be very cold, and hot food is a good way to warm up after a tough day on the trail. Hot drinks are an excellent way to go to bed warm, too.

I skip the stove in the summer and survive on cold food just fine, but not in the winter.
Yep- just added the stove a minute ago. :)

The Cleaner
10-17-2015, 08:45
I didn't see a gallon ziploc for your trash.Are you just gonna throw it in a firepit and let others deal with it? :eek:

Venchka
10-17-2015, 13:56
Checking your updated list. What size are you? Height, weight, body proportions (slender, average, wide) would help in the gear search, especially for used gear.
Kelty Cosmic 0, actually a 4F rated bag. If the rating is close to reality, good enough. Found it online just now for $232. Under budget. Way heavy. Still looking.
Possible alternate bag: REI Igneo. (http://www.rei.com/product/862532/rei-igneo-sleeping-bag) A 20F bag, marginal for February but could work with the right clothes. 1 pound 13 ounces. $300, will probably go on sale between now and January.
Therm-A-Rest Base Camp sleeping pad. FAGETTABOUTIT. Heavier than the Kelty Cosmic 0 bag.
Alternate: Exped Down Mat Lite 5 (http://www.rei.com/product/847123/exped-downmat-lite-5-air-pad-with-minipump). R-4, possibly add an inexpensive blue foam pad and you are at R-5+. 1 pound 7 ounces. $115, will probably go on sale between now and January.
Osprey Volt 75. $200. 3 pounds 12 ounces. Not a terrible choice, but if you save money from the bag & pad purchases you can find a better, lighter pack for "A Few Dollars More". Bonus points if you can tell me who stared in the movie. :D
Alternate pack: ULA Circuit (http://www.ula-equipment.com/product_p/circuit.htm). $235. 2 pounds 9 ounces. Highly regarded by very happy owners.

I do hope that my research helps. Watch the weight of all of your purchases. I know you have a budget, but sometimes you can find reasonably light items that will do the job needed and fit your budget. Watch for used gear and sales. Places to watch for sales: REI, Backcountry Gear in Eugene, Oregon, Moosejaw. Lots of others. I have done business with these 3 and I am pleased with their service.

Wayne

Pots
10-18-2015, 00:21
I didn't see a gallon ziploc for your trash.Are you just gonna throw it in a firepit and let others deal with it? :eek:

Of course not! I considered it part of my "dry sacks/bags".


Checking your updated list. What size are you? Height, weight, body proportions (slender, average, wide) would help in the gear search, especially for used gear.
Kelty Cosmic 0, actually a 4F rated bag. If the rating is close to reality, good enough. Found it online just now for $232. Under budget. Way heavy. Still looking.
Possible alternate bag: REI Igneo. (http://www.rei.com/product/862532/rei-igneo-sleeping-bag) A 20F bag, marginal for February but could work with the right clothes. 1 pound 13 ounces. $300, will probably go on sale between now and January.
Therm-A-Rest Base Camp sleeping pad. FAGETTABOUTIT. Heavier than the Kelty Cosmic 0 bag.
Alternate: Exped Down Mat Lite 5 (http://www.rei.com/product/847123/exped-downmat-lite-5-air-pad-with-minipump). R-4, possibly add an inexpensive blue foam pad and you are at R-5+. 1 pound 7 ounces. $115, will probably go on sale between now and January.
Osprey Volt 75. $200. 3 pounds 12 ounces. Not a terrible choice, but if you save money from the bag & pad purchases you can find a better, lighter pack for "A Few Dollars More". Bonus points if you can tell me who stared in the movie. :D
Alternate pack: ULA Circuit (http://www.ula-equipment.com/product_p/circuit.htm). $235. 2 pounds 9 ounces. Highly regarded by very happy owners.

I do hope that my research helps. Watch the weight of all of your purchases. I know you have a budget, but sometimes you can find reasonably light items that will do the job needed and fit your budget. Watch for used gear and sales. Places to watch for sales: REI, Backcountry Gear in Eugene, Oregon, Moosejaw. Lots of others. I have done business with these 3 and I am pleased with their service.

Wayne
I'm 5' 10" weighing 155 lbs. I consider myself slender. I like the sleeping bag you recommended but I'll probably be sleeping with all my layers on to keep warm. Which I don't mind to much. I might get that and try it out for a night, I can always return it.

I chose the therm-a-rest because I have heard good things. But you are definitely right, too heavy.

When it comes to the pack I have already purchased the volt and I don't plan on changing it. I'm happy with the fit and all.

Again- Thanks for your help!

Venchka
10-18-2015, 00:41
Volt it is. Osprey is a great company.
You're a bit taller and 10 pounds heavier than I am. You aren't hauling any extra body weight and don't need a wide sleeping bag. That works in your favor.

Wayne

Wa


Sent from somewhere around here.

Venchka
10-18-2015, 17:30
One more pad possibility:
The REI Air Rail self inflating pad. Weight and R-Value similar to the Exped Down-Lite at a lower price.

Wayne


Sent from somewhere around here.

Fredt4
10-18-2015, 22:30
What? no phone? Consider a phone with replaceable batteries (bring 3 to 5) and ditch the battery
Sawyer Squeeze - have you tried using it for your water for a day or two? a week? Try it now before the trail.
AWOL's Trail Guide - Rip it up in various sections, carry only one or two sections at a time.
Stove - I prefer the Snow Peak stove, it's lighter and smaller.
Bear bag? on the AT, forget about it, Perhaps the UrSack for rodents
Medical Kit .5, if you must but bring the .3 instead
Unless you plan on night hiking (did that a lot when I was younger, no longer do so) consider a rechargeable key chain light with a Princeton Impulse as back up 1.0 oz.
Book - get an ebook.
Swiss Classic knife, also works as nail clippers
Bic mini .3 oz

Boots vs trail runners - Seriously reconsider your choice. Few if any people (and despite what you. believe you're not one of them) actually need boots. It's your call but most thru hikers will tell you that trail runners is the way to go.

Lastly consider a lighter pack.
Didn't repeat advice about rain pants & jackets.

Rolex
10-19-2015, 08:43
Of course not! I considered it part of my "dry sacks/bags".


I'm 5' 10" weighing 155 lbs. I consider myself slender. I like the sleeping bag you recommended but I'll probably be sleeping with all my layers on to keep warm. Which I don't mind to much. I might get that and try it out for a night, I can always return it.

I chose the therm-a-rest because I have heard good things. But you are definitely right, too heavy.

When it comes to the pack I have already purchased the volt and I don't plan on changing it. I'm happy with the fit and all.

Again- Thanks for your help!

My Two cents. I bought a handful of equipment while working here in PA last week. Among it was a near new Kelty Cosmic 0 degree. Since it forecasted below freezing Saturday night I tried it.
I was in thin longjohn bottoms and a thin poly top. I had a beanie but never used it. The temp got down to 27 degrees and I woke up to spitting snow. I was on a Thermarest foam air about 1 inch thick. No tent or tarp and was cowboy camping.
I sleep fairly cold and am similar build at 5'8" and 160. IT was perfectly warm all night. Only thing I noticed was the zipper was a PITA and I'm going to wax it in hopes of it running a little smoother.
I would definitely trust this one down to 10 degrees so far. I'll know more when I try it in those kinda temps.

Boots and Backpacks
10-19-2015, 11:06
Just my thoughts on this. I started last winter on 12/30, and finished in July. You should still expect to have some nights close to 0* that time of the year.
1. Sawyer's will freeze early on.
A. Try Aquamira drops or even bleach (put bleach in a eye dropper, 2 drops per liter, let sit for 30 minutes)
2. Cosmic 0* Bag is heavy for the money.
A. Have you looked into an Enlightened Equipment Top Quilt (http://www.enlightenedequipment.com/enigma/) ($270)? With a 0* rating your weight is going to be 25oz, and that's over a 1lb lighter then the Cosmic.
3. Exped DownMat is a good choice, but check the warranty. You'll pop a couple of those along the way, and you want to make sure they have a lifetime warranty.
A. Big Agnes has a no hassle lifetime warranty on their pads. If you pop one on the trail they'll send a new one no questions asked. I did this 4 times in 6 months this year, and never once had an issue.
4. The TarpTent is great unless you want something free standing. However you can't beat the weight/cost ratio on this one.
5. MORE SOCKS!!!!!!!
A. I was to stress this one for you. We met so many people that only carried 2 pairs of socks, and it was bad. Blisters, hot spots, sores, and socks that don't last. We carried 4 pairs of hiking sock each the entire trail. The same 4 we started with were the same 4 we finished with. One had 2 blisters each over roughly 2200's. We new several people that got off the trail due to foot problems, and they contributed this socks or shoes.

Pots
10-19-2015, 11:27
One more pad possibility:
The REI Air Rail self inflating pad. Weight and R-Value similar to the Exped Down-Lite at a lower price.

Wayne


Sent from somewhere around here.
I'll be comparing all the recommendations I have been getting. Seems like there are a lot of pad options.


What? no phone? Consider a phone with replaceable batteries (bring 3 to 5) and ditch the battery
Sawyer Squeeze - have you tried using it for your water for a day or two? a week? Try it now before the trail.
AWOL's Trail Guide - Rip it up in various sections, carry only one or two sections at a time.
Stove - I prefer the Snow Peak stove, it's lighter and smaller.
Bear bag? on the AT, forget about it, Perhaps the UrSack for rodents
Medical Kit .5, if you must but bring the .3 instead
Unless you plan on night hiking (did that a lot when I was younger, no longer do so) consider a rechargeable key chain light with a Princeton Impulse as back up 1.0 oz.
Book - get an ebook.
Swiss Classic knife, also works as nail clippers
Bic mini .3 oz

Boots vs trail runners - Seriously reconsider your choice. Few if any people (and despite what you. believe you're not one of them) actually need boots. It's your call but most thru hikers will tell you that trail runners is the way to go.

Lastly consider a lighter pack.
Didn't repeat advice about rain pants & jackets.
I have a 26 edge I will be bringing. That and the battery are a luxury that I would like to keep.
I will be trying all my gear out before the trail but I can't purchase everything right now! I think the squeeze will work great for me though.. :)
I've heard that from a bunch of people and plan on doing it with the guide.
That stove looks nice.. I will look into it when I can a bit more. If it is lighter I probably will switch.
Bear bag is more of a personal paranoia. I might rethink that one. :confused:
I will not be night hiking unless I have to.

I really want to do trail runners but I roll my ankle sooo much. I'm not even sure if mid boots would help.


Just my thoughts on this. I started last winter on 12/30, and finished in July. You should still expect to have some nights close to 0* that time of the year.
1. Sawyer's will freeze early on.
A. Try Aquamira drops or even bleach (put bleach in a eye dropper, 2 drops per liter, let sit for 30 minutes)
2. Cosmic 0* Bag is heavy for the money.
A. Have you looked into an Enlightened Equipment Top Quilt (http://www.enlightenedequipment.com/enigma/) ($270)? With a 0* rating your weight is going to be 25oz, and that's over a 1lb lighter then the Cosmic.
3. Exped DownMat is a good choice, but check the warranty. You'll pop a couple of those along the way, and you want to make sure they have a lifetime warranty.
A. Big Agnes has a no hassle lifetime warranty on their pads. If you pop one on the trail they'll send a new one no questions asked. I did this 4 times in 6 months this year, and never once had an issue.
4. The TarpTent is great unless you want something free standing. However you can't beat the weight/cost ratio on this one.
5. MORE SOCKS!!!!!!!
A. I was to stress this one for you. We met so many people that only carried 2 pairs of socks, and it was bad. Blisters, hot spots, sores, and socks that don't last. We carried 4 pairs of hiking sock each the entire trail. The same 4 we started with were the same 4 we finished with. One had 2 blisters each over roughly 2200's. We new several people that got off the trail due to foot problems, and they contributed this socks or shoes.
I'm falling in love with that quilt. I haven't even considered them until now. It seems perfect... I'll also probably be adding more socks haha.

Boots and Backpacks
10-19-2015, 11:39
I'm falling in love with that quilt. I haven't even considered them until now. It seems perfect... I'll also probably be adding more socks haha.

The quilts are amazing. We have a 40*, 20*, and 0* degree Enigma. Super warm, packable, and not much weight. Get Darn Tough socks since they also stand behind their warranty (lifetime).

coyote9
11-10-2015, 13:53
Good list Pots. I agree the pack can be scaled down thus cutting weight. I picked up an extra (loaner) pack, a small Osprey, at the REI garage sale. Hit those up. Or check craigslist or garage sales. With the gear you listed, does that 75 have a lot of empty space?

I do think you may get pretty cold with that pad in Feb. That may be something you'll have to bite the bullet on? You are tarp tenting right?

Good job, maybe Ill see you out there.

Pots
11-10-2015, 15:59
Good list Pots. I agree the pack can be scaled down thus cutting weight. I picked up an extra (loaner) pack, a small Osprey, at the REI garage sale. Hit those up. Or check craigslist or garage sales. With the gear you listed, does that 75 have a lot of empty space?

I do think you may get pretty cold with that pad in Feb. That may be something you'll have to bite the bullet on? You are tarp tenting right?

Good job, maybe Ill see you out there.
I don't have all the gear yet so I'm not sure about the fill yet but I am thinking of getting a smaller pack. I can always remove parts of the pack also.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G925A using Tapatalk

Connie
11-10-2015, 16:27
Here is something for strengthening ankles before getting out to hike trails to condition for hiking in mountains.

http://www.csuchico.edu/~sbarker/injury/ankle/ankle_rehab.pdf

There are also in-shoe ankle supports safe to use: some weaken ankles. I avoid those, even injured.

I prefer Good Feet MAX and trail shoes with good lateral support and squared off heels side-to-side and at the back for sure foot plant. I do not like trail shoes that have rounded edges at the heels. I do not let them get worn. Instead, I get new trail shoes.

It gets to be a significant expense. I shop sales.

I provide my email to be notified of sales.