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bemental
12-06-2015, 16:24
Throwing my hat in for another attempt this year. Last year I made it to Fontana Dam before I had to get off the trail.


Early March start (o/a March 1st). I'm a warm sleeper, and my plan is to take a 30 sleep setup and wear all of my clothes if it gets colder (I have room in my bivouac for extra clothes to be worn).

I've intentionally left a headlamp and a bic lighter off the list. My phone acts as a flashlight and I have a stove if I need to make fire.


Thanks again, people of WhiteBlaze!


http://lighterpack.com/r/39c0za

(Also, there seems to be a bug with the LighterPack interface, so all of my 'worn' items are marked as consumables to get accurate numbers)

Venchka
12-06-2015, 20:54
Bemental,
A good headlamp on low will last 8 or 11 times longer than a phone.
Your stove is self lighting?

Wayne


Sent from somewhere around here.

bemental
12-06-2015, 21:02
Bemental,
A good headlamp on low will last 8 or 11 times longer than a phone.
Your stove is self lighting?

Wayne


Sent from somewhere around here.

Stove is self-lighting, and the amount of time I end up using a headlamp on the trail is so minimal that my phone works just fine.

I'm one of those hiker's who watches the sunset from the sleeping bag and wakes up with the sunrise.

Connie
12-06-2015, 21:08
March.. hmm, I hope you keep your sleep system is nice and "fluffy" and the clothing you plan to sleep in is reasonably clean.

Dirty or sweaty clothing conducts body heat away.

The benefit of a fluffy sleep system is that it settles in over and around you, and that way there are no big air gaps inside to warm up because the sleeping system does not settle in on you.

bemental
12-06-2015, 21:33
March.. hmm, I hope you keep your sleep system is nice and "fluffy" and the clothing you plan to sleep in is reasonably clean.

Dirty or sweaty clothing conducts body heat away.

The benefit of a fluffy sleep system is that it settles in over and around you, and that way there are no big air gaps inside to warm up because the sleeping system does not settle in on you.

I'm still waiting on the Enlightened Equipment Revelation to arrive. It's a 30* quilt that zips into a sleeping bag, and I plan on taking it outside on a few cold nights to see just how well it works.

I do like a good fluffy sleeping system, and my plans are to keep this in as 'big' a sack as possible while in my pack (to reduce time in the 'fluffing' process upon unpacking).

Connie
12-06-2015, 21:38
Right! Sounds good.

Tim inspired me to go "top quilt".

I didn't have the cash for that Revelation.

I hope you tell us how that worked out for you.

Luther
12-07-2015, 12:08
You could easily cut 2lbs with a new pack.

Portie
12-07-2015, 12:39
Do you include the kit for recharging your portable battery or your iPhone cable? I would want a bit more first aid supplies than just a blister kit. Does your SAK (Swiss Army Knife) have tweezers? Scissors? I would always want two sources of fire. I would always want two sources of light.

Slo-go'en
12-07-2015, 13:06
A headlamp and bic lighter are such inconsequential weights and can be life savers so there is really no good reason not to have them. Try to light a campfire with your stove or hike any distance at night with your phone. You may never have to do that, but if for some unforeseen reason you do, you'd be in trouble.

It's might be a warm winter and spring this year, but even so I don't think a 30 degree quilt is going cut it in March.

Traveler
12-07-2015, 13:07
I've intentionally left a headlamp and a bic lighter off the list. My phone acts as a flashlight and I have a stove if I need to make fire.

Thanks again, people of WhiteBlaze!

http://lighterpack.com/r/39c0za

(Also, there seems to be a bug with the LighterPack interface, so all of my 'worn' items are marked as consumables to get accurate numbers)

FWIW, There's very little weight relief in pitching your headlamp and a small Bic lighter. Situations either of them may become very useful can be fairly serious. Long nights with short hiking days has more than a few times caught me miles from where I intended to be. I have tried the cell phone flashlight but they don't last all that long as compared with a decent headlamp weighing in around 3 to 3.5 ounces. A secondary source of fire is not a bad idea, insurance of that through a Bic Mini lighter (.5 oz) is a small price to pay to be able to light the stove when the stove ignition fails (I have seen three JetBoil igniter systems fail over the past two years including my own).

A new pack could probably net about a 2 pound savings, give or take. The other significant weight savings may be in the camp shoes. While these may be a luxury, though I understand the comfort they can provide, I wonder how often they will be used at the front end of the trip when you have winter clothing with you as opposed to using them after the winter gear load has been shipped home which would balance out weight. I would be a little concerned not having a secondary source of fire and a dependable light source for more than a few hours of burn time duration, but thats me.

Odd Man Out
12-07-2015, 13:21
I like Tenacious Tape better than duct tape for gear patching.

Only one pair of pants? Add maybe a base layer and/or gym shorts?

I must have a nail clipper. A scissors on the SAK works for some, but not me.

I must have a sun hat.

Fireplug
12-07-2015, 13:38
My Zpacks pack is a 52L, waterproof and weighs in at 1.6 lbs. I still have a pack cover. My tent it a Zpacks Solplex 1 1/2 man tent with bug screen and bathtub. Waterproof. 1.2 lbs. weight is everyone's concern. Me. Two light sources and two fire starting sources

bemental
12-07-2015, 15:48
You could easily cut 2lbs with a new pack.

The pack is still a point of contention for me Luther, something I know I can change and save some more weight. It was an impulse purchase and not the best pack for the trail - I appreciate the advice.



Do you include the kit for recharging your portable battery or your iPhone cable? I would want a bit more first aid supplies than just a blister kit. Does your SAK (Swiss Army Knife) have tweezers? Scissors? I would always want two sources of fire. I would always want two sources of light.

The charging kit is included in the weight of the battery pack, and I have a set of 'real' scissors in my blister kit. Most thru-hikers I've spoken with have very minimal first aid kits, the theory of "if it's bad enough I'll just get off the trail". What are you suggesting, a few band-aids or an ace bandage? I have neosporin in the blister kit as well.

JaketheFake
12-07-2015, 16:05
I did not see anything on your list for a base layer? I became cold just looking at your list. Are you not wearing any base layers?

Regarding the headlamp, have you considered a lightweight clip on jobber. I do not like headlamps and that is what I am going to carry and clip if to my hat.

bemental
12-07-2015, 16:17
A headlamp and bic lighter are such inconsequential weights and can be life savers so there is really no good reason not to have them. Try to light a campfire with your stove or hike any distance at night with your phone. You may never have to do that, but if for some unforeseen reason you do, you'd be in trouble.

It's might be a warm winter and spring this year, but even so I don't think a 30 degree quilt is going cut it in March.

Thanks Slo-go'en, I've added a mini-bic lighter back onto my packing list, it's just too small not to justify the convenience of having fire in the palm of your hand.

It got pretty cold last year during my thru attempt, a few nights into the teens, and I was OK with a 30* sleeping setup. I won't say it's ideal, but I'm a pretty warm sleeping and it was manageable the few nights it occurred with additional clothing on. Plans for continual nights at below-thirty will probably include a liner to help stay cozy, but otherwise I believe I will do alright.

bemental
12-07-2015, 16:50
I did not see anything on your list for a base layer? I became cold just looking at your list. Are you not wearing any base layers?

Regarding the headlamp, have you considered a lightweight clip on jobber. I do not like headlamps and that is what I am going to carry and clip if to my hat.

Jake, I typically don't use base-layer bottoms ever, and this time around I'm going to try a wicking t-shirt and a fleece combo instead of a base layer-style undershirt to keep warm.

Thoughts?

JaketheFake
12-07-2015, 17:28
Jake, I typically don't use base-layer bottoms ever, and this time around I'm going to try a wicking t-shirt and a fleece combo instead of a base layer-style undershirt to keep warm.

Thoughts?

I am of no help. I am starting in April and one of my concerns is the temps having lived in Texas for 30 years. It sounds as if you are a lot more tolerant of the cold. I am not. However I will do well in June through August. I would like to see if anyone else weighs in.

bemental
12-07-2015, 17:36
I am of no help. I am starting in April and one of my concerns is the temps having lived in Texas for 30 years. It sounds as if you are a lot more tolerant of the cold. I am not. However I will do well in June through August. I would like to see if anyone else weighs in.

I've been quite cold on a number of occasions, and I currently live in Maine. What I can't do in outdoor overnight hikes with my summer gear prior to starting the trail, I make up for in tolerance to the cold.

Interested to see what else people have to say as well.

bemental
12-07-2015, 20:12
My Zpacks pack is a 52L, waterproof and weighs in at 1.6 lbs. I still have a pack cover. My tent it a Zpacks Solplex 1 1/2 man tent with bug screen and bathtub. Waterproof. 1.2 lbs. weight is everyone's concern. Me. Two light sources and two fire starting sources

Fireplug, thanks for the ZPacks recommendation. I'm looking at getting one of their packs now, most likely the Arc Haul in Dyneema (60L, 24oz) - about half the weight of my current pack.

Reviews look good, just waiting to hear back from them about some custom bits for the pack.

bemental
12-07-2015, 21:00
Since added the mini Bic and my headlamp to my gear list. Makes sense to bring them, even if I don't plan on using them (they'll still end up getting some use one way or another).

Updated my pack as well, already cleaning my old pack and putting it up for sale.

Slo-go'en
12-07-2015, 21:05
I've been quite cold on a number of occasions, and I currently live in Maine. What I can't do in outdoor overnight hikes with my summer gear prior to starting the trail, I make up for in tolerance to the cold.

Interested to see what else people have to say as well.

I say your a fool to think that. You can get hypothermia as quickly as anyone else. Coming out of a cold Maine winter is an asset, but doesn't make you superman.

As for your gear list, I would add long johns and a long sleeve thermal base top. They can be light weight, but you really should have them. As it is you have no "camp" or sleep clothes. Trade off the camp shoes if you want to keep the weight about the same. Even with those added, your a bit marginal for March, based on historical records. But you never know, we might just not get a winter on the east coast this year.

bemental
12-07-2015, 21:26
I say your a fool to think that. You can get hypothermia as quickly as anyone else. Coming out of a cold Maine winter is an asset, but doesn't make you superman.

As for your gear list, I would add long johns and a long sleeve thermal base top. They can be light weight, but you really should have them. As it is you have no "camp" or sleep clothes. Trade off the camp shoes if you want to keep the weight about the same. Even with those added, your a bit marginal for March, based on historical records. But you never know, we might just not get a winter on the east coast this year.

Thanks for the input Slo-go'en. I don't think that I'm not as susceptible to hypothermia because I live in Maine, or that I've been cold before - I believe that the gear I'm bringing will help me combat it.

I typically sleep in an extra pair of shorts (which are on the gear list), and a t-shirt (also on the gear list). If it gets colder than that, I'll wear my puffy and beanie to sleep, which is more usually more than enough. Around camp I'll throw on my camp shoes, keep my pants on from the day, and again, add the puffy, a fleece if I need to, and the beanie for walking around.

I thought it might be overkill to bring my UnderArmour Cold Gear base layer as well, but it might make for good sleeping/camp wear (usually too hot to hike in). I've added it back onto the list - thanks again!

Slo-go'en
12-07-2015, 23:18
Hiking pants don't do much to keep your legs warm when in camp, often their wet too. Your Cold Gear base layer will get lots of use. You need a minimum of two base layers. One you keep dry for camp and sleeping, the other to hike in.

I tried to go without long johns a couple of times and ended up buying a pair along the trail before long. And that was with April starts. Now I just carry them all the time, except during the peak of summer.

I don't know what kind of nylon shirt you have, but I use a Dickie work shirt. It has a fair cotton content, but even so it dries quick enough with body heat, is pretty wind proof, is reasonably warm and is definitely durable. But it is a little heavy.

Oh, and don't forget the sunblock. If it isn't raining, your in the sun.

bigcranky
12-08-2015, 08:34
Glad to hear you're going to give this another try. I'll be rooting for you.

I just read the Arc Haul thread, so I see now where these two threads go together. :) The Arc Haul will make a good thru-hike pack, I think. And if it can shave two pounds from your setup, and let you carry a headlamp and a mini-Bic, so much the better. (Kidding.) I do find a small headlamp valuable, especially early and late in the season. It's pretty easy to get into camp at dinner time in March and it's already dark, having a headlamp helps when pitching my small tent and making dinner. I recently replaced my BD Spot with a Zebralight which takes 1 AA battery. I like the new light a lot.

Casey & Gina
12-08-2015, 11:49
Since added the mini Bic and my headlamp to my gear list. Makes sense to bring them, even if I don't plan on using them (they'll still end up getting some use one way or another).

Updated my pack as well, already cleaning my old pack and putting it up for sale.

Sorry I missed whatever pack you had originally, but be careful - a lighter pack is often less comfortable...if you're keeping your weight very low it's okay but otherwise you may end up regretting going with a lighter pack. I don't see any water or food on your list. Make sure you plan with those in mind. I prefer to have a heavier food and water weight than to be on the verge of running out all the time or facing a day without eating if I lag behind.

Since you are considering the Arc Haul, have a look at the Vargo Ti-Arc as well. It's a pretty great pack IF your weight is kept under 30lbs:
Regular version, 38oz (http://www.vargooutdoors.com/ti-arc-backpack.html)
Cuben Fiber version, 31oz (http://www.vargooutdoors.com/ti-arc-cf-backpack.html), note the lack of upper side pockets

Fireplug
12-13-2015, 17:15
Fireplug, thanks for the ZPacks recommendation. I'm looking at getting one of their packs now, most likely the Arc Haul in Dyneema (60L, 24oz) - about half the weight of my current pack.

Reviews look good, just waiting to hear back from them about some custom bits for the pack.
Order quick. It takes 4 to 6 weeks. They are slammed. I live real close so I just drive to them

egilbe
12-13-2015, 18:11
You can always try a pack ftom hyperlight mountain gear. They are in Biddeford, so a 2 hour drive for you.

bemental
12-13-2015, 18:22
Thanks for the continued suggestions - I pulled the trigger on a ZPacks Arc Haul.

garlic08
12-13-2015, 18:58
As you recognize, you are not immune to hypothermia, but at least you will have plenty of opportunity in ME to be sure your hiking and sleeping setups will work in the low teens with blowing snow, for several days in a row. That's what I encountered twice in the high country north of Fontana Dam. And I started in April. I'm sure you know it--do not underestimate spring weather in the southern Appalachians.

I own a EE Rev30 and it's the best gear purchase I've made in many years. I'm 5-9 and the regular length is long enough to pull over my head as a hood. I hope you find yours works as well as mine does.

LWill92
12-30-2015, 10:31
This is my first post here and I can't offer much advice on your pack, but I did notice you're from Orono, ME. I live in Hampden and I am also planning a thru-hike in 2016! I'm not starting until much later (Mid April) but if you're looking for someone for any shakedowns or practice hikes or anything before then, please keep me in mind.

squeezebox
12-30-2015, 11:05
The folks on the external battery thread are talking about a 10000mah battery.

coyote9
12-31-2015, 19:08
Yeah brother I love my thick Under Armor cold gear. Good on ya brother. I hit the trail in the morning. Have a good hike dude!!

bemental
12-31-2015, 19:21
I already have the 17,000 mAh battery pack, and I'd hate to buy a new one, although it would drop some weight since the thing is around a pound.

cmoulder
12-31-2015, 19:27
Thanks for the continued suggestions - I pulled the trigger on a ZPacks Arc Haul.

I forget if I mentioned this before, and pardon my "One-Note-Sally" response, but make sure to get the optional lumbar pad. I have a Blast and a Zero and they are incredibly comfortable with no lumbar pad, but the addition of the CF crossbar at the bottom of the Haul caused me some pain in the lumbar/sacrum region. Totally cured with the addition of the lumbar pad, and I have read of others who also found the lumbar pad a great addition for this particular model. My Arc Blast is the older one 2013 or '14, but Zpacks is now using the same frame configuration on the Blast, so if it were me I'd absolutely, definitely get the lumbar pad.

oldwetherman
12-31-2015, 20:01
Only suggestion I would make to your gear list is to give some thought to taking along a set of gaiters. I started on march 20th in 2013. The first week or so the weather was okay. Then the snows came. There were more than a few mornings when I was postholing through 8 inches of snow and 15 inch drifts with a line of hikers literally following in my footsteps. I was the only one out there with gaiters. They were short, event shorty gaiters but they kept the snow from running up between my pants and my legs. Good thing about the south is that there's always a bail out point not too far away and plenty of shuttles available to get you to a hostel or town.

walkingjoe
01-14-2016, 16:33
I appreciate you and others posting your gear lists. I am more of a short-term backpacker, and I when I first decided to do the AT this year I was thinking more of my gear was light enough to avoid replacement, but now I'm thinking several big-ticket items are going to have to be replaced. My pack isn't too bad, an external frame 26.6 oz Jansport that will hold more than I could ever need, but the two biggies, tent and sleeping bag, are WAY heavier than any gear list I've seen. To make matters worse, for 45 oz sleeping bag is only 30 deg. That added weight probably wouldn't be catastrophic if it was a 20 deg, but leaving in late March, April 1st at the latest, I have to consider the weight of whatever else is keeping me warm. My mammoth tent is a Eureka Backcountry -- 85.6 whopping oz. This has obviously got to go, and will be one of the more expensive replacements. I do have a netting system and ultralight tarp that could weigh in at under under two pounds, but I'm not sure I like this for the early colder months.

As far as being used to cold weather... I have been in upstate ny the past few years and -10 days and colder nights are routine some years, but that doesn't make me any more willing to freeze on a long-distance hike. I am never cold when I'm hiking, but once I stop and especially for sleep, I like to be warm. The trail offers enough challenges, I would be willing to carry an extra couple pounds if it keeps me warm enough to sleep at night.

My gear list in case anybody's interested... At this point this is mostly me weighing in existing equipment so I can see where I need to make replacements. Haven't gotten to clothing yet, but I've pulled out all my polyester and don't expect to make many expensive purchases there.

http://lighterpack.com/r/19ercp

marc w
01-14-2016, 17:49
I already have the 17,000 mAh battery pack, and I'd hate to buy a new one, although it would drop some weight since the thing is around a pound.

This to me is the easiest and cheapest way to drop over a half pound from your pack. I just ordered a smaller Anker because I felt my big one weighed too much and I really don't need to charge my phone 8 times between towns.

Forester Gump
01-15-2016, 11:29
Bemental,
I thru hiked in 2014, starting March 26. I carried a Marmot Helium (15 degree, 38 oz) bag from Springer to Damascus (Thermarest X-therm insulated pad). I still slept with my clothes on to stay warm. It may be warmer this year, but not worth the risk. I switched to a JRB quilt in Damascus and supplemented that with my Ghost Whisperer down jacket when needed. That may be a bit optimistic with a March 1 start date.

I cooked on an Evernew Ti alcohol stove (with heat exchanger) for the entire hike. I like alcohol stoves...simple, light and nothing to break. But, I looked on with envy when other hikers would fire up their Jetboil stoves and have instant hot food and drinks. I am carrying a Jetboil (Ti) to Damascus where I will switch to alcohol.

On another note...I used to wear silk unders until my wife broke the news to me that I stunk. I now wear Merino wool for the benefit of everyone else.

I may see you on the trail...I plan on heading north again from Springer during that first week of March. I am retired and have a very understanding wife.

Good luck,
Forester Gump

Fireplug
01-16-2016, 12:07
Fireplug, thanks for the ZPacks recommendation. I'm looking at getting one of their packs now, most likely the Arc Haul in Dyneema (60L, 24oz) - about half the weight of my current pack.

Reviews look good, just waiting to hear back from them about some custom bits for the pack.

better order soon. All their stuff is custom made and can take up to 6 to 8 weeks to get. Call and talk to Matt. I've met him a few times at their shop. Great guy. Also RedBeard works there now. I live about 40 miles from their shop.

Fireplug
01-16-2016, 12:09
I forget if I mentioned this before, and pardon my "One-Note-Sally" response, but make sure to get the optional lumbar pad. I have a Blast and a Zero and they are incredibly comfortable with no lumbar pad, but the addition of the CF crossbar at the bottom of the Haul caused me some pain in the lumbar/sacrum region. Totally cured with the addition of the lumbar pad, and I have read of others who also found the lumbar pad a great addition for this particular model. My Arc Blast is the older one 2013 or '14, but Zpacks is now using the same frame configuration on the Blast, so if it were me I'd absolutely, definitely get the lumbar pad.


All the Zpacks packs are now using the lumbar pad. It's standard now.

Fireplug
01-16-2016, 12:12
I appreciate you and others posting your gear lists. I am more of a short-term backpacker, and I when I first decided to do the AT this year I was thinking more of my gear was light enough to avoid replacement, but now I'm thinking several big-ticket items are going to have to be replaced. My pack isn't too bad, an external frame 26.6 oz Jansport that will hold more than I could ever need, but the two biggies, tent and sleeping bag, are WAY heavier than any gear list I've seen. To make matters worse, for 45 oz sleeping bag is only 30 deg. That added weight probably wouldn't be catastrophic if it was a 20 deg, but leaving in late March, April 1st at the latest, I have to consider the weight of whatever else is keeping me warm. My mammoth tent is a Eureka Backcountry -- 85.6 whopping oz. This has obviously got to go, and will be one of the more expensive replacements. I do have a netting system and ultralight tarp that could weigh in at under under two pounds, but I'm not sure I like this for the early colder months.

As far as being used to cold weather... I have been in upstate ny the past few years and -10 days and colder nights are routine some years, but that doesn't make me any more willing to freeze on a long-distance hike. I am never cold when I'm hiking, but once I stop and especially for sleep, I like to be warm. The trail offers enough challenges, I would be willing to carry an extra couple pounds if it keeps me warm enough to sleep at night.

My gear list in case anybody's interested... At this point this is mostly me weighing in existing equipment so I can see where I need to make replacements. Haven't gotten to clothing yet, but I've pulled out all my polyester and don't expect to make many expensive purchases there.

http://lighterpack.com/r/19ercp

if money isn't an issue. Look into Zpacks tents. I have the Solplex 1 1/2 person tent. 1.8 lbs. YouTube it. I love mine

bemental
01-17-2016, 15:31
Bemental,
I thru hiked in 2014, starting March 26. I carried a Marmot Helium (15 degree, 38 oz) bag from Springer to Damascus (Thermarest X-therm insulated pad). I still slept with my clothes on to stay warm. It may be warmer this year, but not worth the risk. I switched to a JRB quilt in Damascus and supplemented that with my Ghost Whisperer down jacket when needed. That may be a bit optimistic with a March 1 start date.

I cooked on an Evernew Ti alcohol stove (with heat exchanger) for the entire hike. I like alcohol stoves...simple, light and nothing to break. But, I looked on with envy when other hikers would fire up their Jetboil stoves and have instant hot food and drinks. I am carrying a Jetboil (Ti) to Damascus where I will switch to alcohol.

On another note...I used to wear silk unders until my wife broke the news to me that I stunk. I now wear Merino wool for the benefit of everyone else.

I may see you on the trail...I plan on heading north again from Springer during that first week of March. I am retired and have a very understanding wife.

Good luck,
Forester Gump

I contacted EE and let them know that I wanted to change my quilt from a 30* to a 20*. I'm trying to get away with using one quilt for the entire hike, and am hoping that by going to a 20* I don't shoot myself in the foot later up the trail.

Forester Gump
01-17-2016, 16:04
Bemental,
20degree is better than 30,but you are still cutting it close. What is the R-factor of your sleep pad? You need insulation between you and the ground. I just accepted the fact that my pack would be a little heavier until I reached Damascus, VA. The stretch up to Waynesboro can still be cold in April and early May.

I live in the far northern tip of Michigan's Upper Peninsula where harsh winters are a way of life. I guess I am just a little more cautious when it comes to cold.

On another note, cuben fiber packs are great but costly. I opted for a ULA Circuit. It is comfortable and carries everything you need. It is probably a little less than the Z-pack. You can use the savings across the rest of your gear.

We should cross paths on our way north. Good luck with the final preparations. Don't forget a trail guide (I use AWOL), and a pass to the GSMNP.

Forester Gump

egilbe
01-17-2016, 18:56
I contacted EE and let them know that I wanted to change my quilt from a 30* to a 20*. I'm trying to get away with using one quilt for the entire hike, and am hoping that by going to a 20* I don't shoot myself in the foot later up the trail.

Can also buy a 40* or 50* synthetic quilt to stack with your current 30* quilt and stack them. It works pretty good.

bemental
01-23-2016, 15:57
Bemental,
20degree is better than 30,but you are still cutting it close. What is the R-factor of your sleep pad? You need insulation between you and the ground. I just accepted the fact that my pack would be a little heavier until I reached Damascus, VA. The stretch up to Waynesboro can still be cold in April and early May.

I live in the far northern tip of Michigan's Upper Peninsula where harsh winters are a way of life. I guess I am just a little more cautious when it comes to cold.

On another note, cuben fiber packs are great but costly. I opted for a ULA Circuit. It is comfortable and carries everything you need. It is probably a little less than the Z-pack. You can use the savings across the rest of your gear.

We should cross paths on our way north. Good luck with the final preparations. Don't forget a trail guide (I use AWOL), and a pass to the GSMNP.

Forester Gump

So, my EE quilt arrived before I could ask them to bump it to a 20, but I think I've got a solution. I've another lightweight sleeping bag that's rated for 30 that I'm going to take with me in addition to the 30 quilt from EE. It's definitely the cheapest solution I have, and from reading my journals from last year it was also inadequate on its own.

I do believe that the combination of the two will suffice.

bemental
01-23-2016, 16:00
if money isn't an issue. Look into Zpacks tents. I have the Solplex 1 1/2 person tent. 1.8 lbs. YouTube it. I love mine

I much enjoy tarping, and can't imagine sleeping in a tent anymore. I have a bivy that I use and much prefer that experience over being stuck in a tent.

Only exclusion is bugs. It kinda sucks to be stuck in a bivy when the bugs are out as opposed to the overall spaciousness of a tent.

Cheyou
01-23-2016, 16:03
Get a sea to summit nano bug net 2.9 oz

thom

bemental
01-23-2016, 16:17
Get a sea to summit nano bug net 2.9 oz

thom

Only problem is what do you attach it to? The images I'm pulling up have it pyramided and attached by the top.

Puddlefish
01-23-2016, 16:27
Only problem is what do you attach it to? The images I'm pulling up have it pyramided and attached by the top.

For very minimalist, there's the bug baffler at .58 oz. Just covers your head, and has little straps that keep it in place. Just ignore all those mosquito bites on your arms, they'll add character, or EEE, or something.

bemental
01-23-2016, 17:07
For very minimalist, there's the bug baffler at .58 oz. Just covers your head, and has little straps that keep it in place. Just ignore all those mosquito bites on your arms, they'll add character, or EEE, or something.

I've got a mosquito hood that I can wear, but the bivy also has the built in no-see-um mesh. The only real problem comes when the days are long, and it's too hot to sleep in the bivy.

Puddlefish
01-23-2016, 17:19
For the nano bug net, I'd imagine you could run a lightweight line between two trees, or up to an overhead live branch, or even between two hiking poles and some creative guyline. A big mylar balloon?, yeah, definitely go with the balloon.

Cheyou
01-23-2016, 17:31
Shock cord and a tie out on the tarp . Sew on a loop for the bug net. Bivy sacks are hot and have condensation problems . I just use a bug head net. But when the bugs are bad and hot use the nano net.

thom