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View Full Version : Polarmond - All in One sleep system



PennyPincher
01-05-2016, 11:58
http://www.wideopenspaces.com/the-all-in-one-sleeping-system-from-polarmond-won-the-gold-outdoor-industry-award-video/

Opinions on this? Has anyone used it?

Seems heavy to me. From the companies website
http://www.mikeott.ch/wordpress/products/?lang=en

tarditi
01-05-2016, 13:17
Looks clever - what is the combined weight of your shelter + sleep system? That's the comparison...

Cheyou
01-05-2016, 13:26
"Penny Pincher" I bet it's not in your price range , ;0)

capehiker
01-05-2016, 13:52
The largest of the models looks pretty neat but the weight is a killjoy. I believe this type of system would be appealing to the bushcraft or survivalist enthusiast, not a long distance hiker.


Looks clever - what is the combined weight of your shelter + sleep system? That's the comparison...

My shelter, 20 degree bag, and sleep pad come in at 60 ounces total. They would have to come down to 5lbs total for the large system for me to even consider it.

PennyPincher
01-05-2016, 16:33
The largest of the models looks pretty neat but the weight is a killjoy. I believe this type of system would be appealing to the bushcraft or survivalist enthusiast, not a long distance hiker.



My shelter, 20 degree bag, and sleep pad come in at 60 ounces total. They would have to come down to 5lbs total for the large system for me to even consider it.

That's about what mine weighs and those were my thoughts as well. Pretty heavy at 5kg = 11 lbs

Franco
01-05-2016, 18:12
Apart from the weight I bet the packed size is not all that good (for hikers) either.
Not that I see any specs there...
Another point is this :
iner: The liner (3a) has a skin-friendly, breathable membrane against the skin. In between the membrane and synthetic fibre fleece is a moisture barrier that traps body moisture and collects it in the gap. The moisture barrier ensures that body moisture is directed away from the sleeping room. This moisture is collected and can be shaken out of the liner in the morning – either as water droplets or ice crystals in sub-zero temperatures.

I'd like to see how that works in reality at least in above freezing weather.

4eyedbuzzard
01-05-2016, 18:33
Pretty heavy for what it offers. Similar space and warmth can be had for half the weight (and less) with tent, pad, and bag.

Franco
01-05-2016, 19:31
A similar concept was pioneered years ago by Pneugear with their Coccon 4.
I think that one failed because of weight,bulk and cost but for a very small niche it could have worked.
This is the one :
http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e389/Francophoto/Pneugear%20Coccon%204_zps0uncqkdc.jpg

Malto
01-05-2016, 19:37
It weighs more than my entire gear setup. And it makes my little mid seem like a palace. No thanks on both counts.

freetimefanatic
11-27-2016, 08:15
http://www.wideopenspaces.com/the-all-in-one-sleeping-system-from-polarmond-won-the-gold-outdoor-industry-award-video/

Opinions on this? Has anyone used it?

Seems heavy to me. From the companies website
http://www.mikeott.ch/wordpress/products/?lang=en


Hi,

I was lucky to be able to test the polarmond in Iceland in September, and will be testing it again under winter conditions next weekend, and through December to March in the German alps.

Iceland - I flew out at the end of September to observe the northern lights and test the polarmond for 3 nights at temperatures around 0. After around 20 mins in the bag, the inside temperature rose to a stable 26c. I was able to sleep comfortably in just jeans and a t-shirt without using the liner (thin sleeping bag which is used more as a blanket). It rained heavily, so I did awake a few times in the night - I used these moments to check temperatures. Inside the tunnel, +- 26,5 / inside the tent +- 5 / outside air temperature 0-1,5.

As mentioned, it rained heavily on all three nights, and was fairly windy too. However the base unit and the thermarest remained dry inside. The tent remained dry too, but as your head is inside the tent section some moisture will accumalate as with almost all tents.

We were car-camping in Iceland, because we had to cover some distances to get the best views depending on the weather conditions and cloud coverage. This means that I did not have to pack the polarmond into its original bags everyday - that would have been fun bearing in mind that it rained most of the night. I was able to remove the thermarest then just fold the tent up lightly and place it in the back of the car, where it was able to dry out during the daytime. I was careful to check if moisture accumalated in the tunnel, or outside on the chest and head section of the bag itself, this was not the case.

Facit:

Practical - the first 3-4 times that I pitched the polarmond took around 20 mins all-in. I expect to reduce that further with more tests in the coming weeks. Note, that I did separate the tent and the base for storing in the vehicle, so 3-4 mins were required to re-zip the modules together. This is done with two zippers, one inside and one outside. Good comfort factor, gear and food stay warm, damp clothing can dry out (depending on how long you sleep), no noticeable buildup of moisture in the tunnel or on the outside surfaces of the bag - despite having damp clothing in the tunnel.

Advantages:

1. Relatively compact - looking at the standard bags for the individual components it seems to take a lot of space. I roll up the base unit and store this vertically in my 50l rucksack, leaving space to get the other parts as well as a cooker, water and personal items in my pack. I tried using the bag delivered, but the diameter was too tight for my pack, and you could feel the pressure in your back. It was also quicker to unpack without the compression bag and I don't have to empty my entire rucksack to get it out of the pack.

2. The thermarest mat is specially made for polarmond, and comes with pump-bag to inflate it. This zips into the floor of the base unit, which means you are fully insulated from the ground, and very unlikey to get wet if the ground is wet. It also means you can't slide off the mat during the night and wake up with a cold shoulder.

3. Space inside the tunnel to store water, food and items such as mobile phones, cameras, GPS etc. They stay warm and cannot freeze.

4. Modular - you can zip the tent module or the biwak module on and off accordingly. The biwak module can stay zipped on when you roll up the base unit to pack away. This would be possible with the tent module too, but then it is rathy bulky and unlikely to fit in a reasonbly sized rucksack. I have not tested this yet, but will look at it soon.

5. One product for all temperature zones from -30 to +25. To cover these temperature zones with conventional equipment you would need at least 2-3 different sleeping bags, and at least 2 different mats. You might still be able to afford to buy all that gear and maybe you would even save a few dollars or euros, but then you also have to store and maintain all that gear. This is a product designed to be used regularly, and all year round, and therefore more destined for serious or professional outdoor-fans.

6. Sleeping comfort - is surprisingly good, you can move around, sleep on your side, or on your front. It is almost like sleeping in a bed. The "inlet" is like a thin sleeping bag which you only need above freezing point, and is generally used more as a blanket. This is far more effective than I expected. The zipper on the bag acts as a vent to regulate the temperature and let moisture out into the tent compartment - works well, and is far easier to use than the internal zipper on your mummy-bag.

Disadvantages:

1. The price is initially high - even when compared to buying multiple bags, mats and a lightweight tent. However, the first production run is in progress, and if the concept takes off then the price may well fall next year. Wait and see! Polarmond are also planning on offering end-customers a discount if they buy 3 units together.

2. Getting in and out is a little tricky at first, but like with all tents, it is only a matter of getting used to it. I tested the tent-version and was able to keep my rucksack inside and still have space to sit, take off my boots and then slip into the bag. Once inside, I removed my winter trousers and, after about 15 mins I was able to remove my pullover too. Bear in mind when you sit in the tent, you actually sit on the end of the sleeping bag section and thermarest, so you stay warm.

3. Packing - it takes a while to find the best way of rolling up the base unit and getting it back into the bag, or your rucksack - depending on how you prefer to pack. However, once you get used to it, its no problem. Yes, it is a little bulkier than some tents, but then the sleeping bag is included. It really depends on how you pack your gear.

I hope that this answers a few of your questions. I'll continue to test this in the coming weeks at temperatures below freezing, and will report back from time to time. Feel free to contact me if you have specific questions.

Photos - Northern lights taken near to Hella (Iceland) / Volcano Hekla taken from the middle of the lavafield early in the morning. As the lava field consists of nothing more than loose volcanic stones and ash, it was dificult to get the normal tension on the tent and remove the folds - still, stayed dry although it rained all night.

3719037191

freetimefanatic
11-27-2016, 08:22
Hi,

6. Sleeping comfort - is surprisingly good, you can move around, sleep on your side, or on your front. It is almost like sleeping in a bed. The "inlet" is like a thin sleeping bag which you only need above freezing point, and is generally used more as a blanket. This is far more effective than I expected. The zipper on the bag acts as a vent to regulate the temperature and let moisture out into the tent compartment - works well, and is far easier to use than the internal zipper on your mummy-bag.


Correction - you only need the inlet BELOW freezing point!