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View Full Version : Which is better, 600ml or 900ml?



Mountain Bluebird
03-08-2016, 13:32
I want to purchase a Caldera Cone, but am unsure which size pot is better for a solo hiker's cooking. Experiences? Thoughts? Dogma?:banana

Cheyou
03-08-2016, 13:48
I want to purchase a Caldera Cone, but am unsure which size pot is better for a solo hiker's cooking. Experiences? Thoughts? Dogma?:banana


do you cook or just rehydrate food ? How much water do u need for each meal ?

bigcranky
03-08-2016, 14:54
900ml.

I can get by with a 700ml when solo and just boiling water, but as soon as I try to cook, say, a pasta side with a bag of chicken, it just doesn't fit.

Some hikers are fine with a 550 or 600ml pot, though.

DuneElliot
03-08-2016, 14:56
I have the 700 Snowpeak Trek and it just isn't quite big enough. I bought the 900 and hoping that it's about perfect

Slo-go'en
03-08-2016, 14:56
600 ml is only 2 1/2 cups which is too small to cook the hiker staple Knorr sides. 900 ml is getting to be kinda big. I use a 750 ml pot which has worked out nicely.

QiWiz
03-08-2016, 15:19
I want to purchase a Caldera Cone, but am unsure which size pot is better for a solo hiker's cooking. Experiences? Thoughts? Dogma?:banana

I prefer 900-1000 myself. I like to have two cups of tea and two cups of water for my dinner meal, so a bigger pot works better. YMMV.

PAHiker
03-08-2016, 15:36
If you only have one pot and need to boil more water, it is easier to boil less water than the bigger pot will hold than it is to boil more water than the smaller pot can hold.

Heliotrope
03-08-2016, 16:00
900ml.

I can get by with a 700ml when solo and just boiling water, but as soon as I try to cook, say, a pasta side with a bag of chicken, it just doesn't fit.

Some hikers are fine with a 550 or 600ml pot, though.

Agreed. 600-700 for boiling water. I use a 700mL fir boil in bag meals which I prefer. But use a 1 L for "cooking"


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squeezebox
03-08-2016, 16:27
I bought a Licamp 1 L with the heat exchange ring at 190 gr. Aluminum. Do you think the heat exchanger is worth the extra wt?

Hosh
03-08-2016, 23:04
I have an Evernew 1.3l ultra-light ti pot. It's maybe too large for solo, except it's .5 ounces heavier than a 900ml, it provides enough hot water to FB cook a 5 ounce meal, 2 hot drinks and some extra warm water for clean up. Over time the fuel savings in not having to sometimes do 2 heat cycles and run the risk of a spill or boil over is worth the extra $'s and weight.

It is also my go to for 2 person trips.

4eyedbuzzard
03-09-2016, 17:56
I bought a Licamp 1 L with the heat exchange ring at 190 gr. Aluminum. Do you think the heat exchanger is worth the extra wt?
I think it depends upon the length of trip, number of meals prepared between resupply/refuel and what type of stove you use. Figure that a similar high quality pot like a 1 liter Evernew Pasta Pot or Toaks are about 4 oz. vs. 6.7 oz for the Olicamp. Olicamp claims up to 40% greater fuel efficiency, but that sounds a bit optimistic to me. For an overnight or weekend, its probably not more efficient from a weight standpoint. For anything beyond 2 to 3 days, yeah, it probably saves its weight in fuel used. But we are taking a few ounces here - the most you can possibly "save" is the net weight of fuel. For weekend or short section hikes, if you use a canister stove, there's little likelihood that you'll be able to take just the exact amount of fuel necessary. With an alcohol stove, which BTW many don't like to use with heat exchanger type pots, you're probably going to error on the side of too much fuel anyway. But, like I said, we are taking about a few ounces here at most.

Now, if you really can burn 40%, or even 25% less fuel, that's a pretty good trade on the cost of fuel, and it's a nice environmental plus as well, but it may not show up as saved pack weight.

CarlZ993
03-09-2016, 18:04
If you 'cook' in the pot, I'd go w/ 900 ml (that's what I carry).

GreenBlaze
03-09-2016, 20:36
600 ml is only 2 1/2 cups which is too small to cook the hiker staple Knorr sides. 900 ml is getting to be kinda big. I use a 750 ml pot which has worked out nicely.

I have a 1.1L and a 775ML pot. Both are MSR Alpine Stowaway models. Stainless Steel to boot. I mainly use the 775. It weighs 9oz more than a titanium pot of the same size, but these pots are awesome and worth the extra weight.

Hosh
03-09-2016, 21:36
You gotta luv those SST pots, last for ever, indestructible, first line of defense against bears. I have a SST mug that I don't carry and don't have the heart to put it in the REI collection bin.

SWODaddy
03-09-2016, 21:41
Of those two...the 900ml, easily. 600ml will be good for boiling up to 2 cups of water and just about nothing else.

cmoulder
03-10-2016, 09:58
The Olicamp XTS pot with lid weighs 8 oz according to my digital scale, so not quite as light as advertised. The pot alone was 6.8oz. The plastic lid could be exchanged for something lighter if one is counting grams.

I did a couple of test burns with n-butane and BRS-3000T with cold (42F) water and it used 9.3g of fuel with the flame set at what seemed optimal for efficiency, which is to say nowhere near full blast. That is quite good fuel efficiency. The time to boil was reasonable — maybe 5-6 minutes — but as long as boil times aren't stupid-long I don't even worry about it. When folks start obsessing over super-quick boil times I know right away they don't know a lot about stove efficiency.

Hosh
03-10-2016, 11:26
Not to hijack this thread, well maybe just a couple of post, do you use your BRS-3000T as a primary stove. I've used mine for overnights, but still wondering about long term reliability.

cmoulder
03-10-2016, 14:10
Yes, now using it as primary. I think it can last a long time if we're always careful not to cross-thread or overtighten when attaching it to the canister. There really isn't a whole lot to go wrong: Threads, o-rings and schmutz in the jet. I keep it in the little green bag to help keep nano-junk from getting in there.

I've used mine quite a bit for cold weather testing (changing canisters a lot) and a few times in the field. My actual kit is a somewhat personalized/specialized winter setup using a JB MiniMo pot. The whole saga can be found HERE (https://backpackinglight.com/forums/topic/98947/) but if you read the last couple of pages that's the latest (and final) iteration.