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TheWhiteWalker
03-21-2016, 21:58
I heard someone recommend putting food in Zip Lock Freezer bags and pouring boiling water on top of the food and eating out of the Zip Lock Bag. I would think that boiling water could melt a Zip Lock bag or leach out chemicals... maybe I am wrong. Has anyone tried that or recommend it???

I would prefer not taking a bowl because of the extra space, weight, and cleaning involved. I like the idea of the Zip Lock bags but I am not sure if it is safe.

mtntopper
03-21-2016, 22:39
I heard someone recommend putting food in Zip Lock Freezer bags and pouring boiling water on top of the food and eating out of the Zip Lock Bag. I would think that boiling water could melt a Zip Lock bag or leach out chemicals... maybe I am wrong. Has anyone tried that or recommend it???

I would prefer not taking a bowl because of the extra space, weight, and cleaning involved. I like the idea of the Zip Lock bags but I am not sure if it is safe.

Google freezer bag cooking..............most of my meals are made this way

TNhiker
03-21-2016, 22:52
yeah.....

google it..............or as someone who has pulled some time in jail/prison..........

i was at icewater shelter a few years ago, in 4 foot of snow, by myself for most of the day and night when 2 guys came in at like 2 in the morning..............scared the beejeebuz outta me..

i had some pulled pork BBQ hung in the cables that i figured i could get them to eat so i didnt have to haul it out....

so they proceeded to cook it FBC style.....

i was watching of course, as this method has crossed my mind, so i asked about it....

response was----"yeah, both of us did this when we were on the inside to make meals"......


me---oh........

Rain Man
03-21-2016, 22:55
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=freezer+bag+cooking

TNhiker
03-21-2016, 22:56
should say "or ask"

TheWhiteWalker
03-21-2016, 22:57
OK, i just googled it and it does seem popular. They also make some nice cozy bags to keep the zip lock bags warm. I always thought that hot water and cheap plastic was a recipe for eating/drinking chemicals. Thanks!

TNhiker
03-21-2016, 22:59
cheap plastic is....

so you need freezer bags...

using regular bags, i believe, will melt........

Slo-go'en
03-21-2016, 23:08
Yes it works, no it doesn't leach out chemicals and it's a fairly popular method of preparing meals. In addition to the freezer bags, you need a "cozy" which is an insulated sleeve to place the bag into and keep it hot.

Lighter weight sandwich bags are too thin to support this type of cooking and could fail, creating a mess.

Personally, I just cook in my pot. I don't think it uses all that much more fuel and is easier to clean. Plus, I go through enough zip locks as it is, don't need to be using up any more.

MuddyWaters
03-22-2016, 03:06
Cozies arent needed

You have insulation to use if think about it

Extra ziplock to double bag weighs less than cozy

sheperd80
03-22-2016, 09:42
You dot need a boil for most meals. Just hot simmering water. And consider using something already carried as a cozy. I use my beanie most of the time, or a bandana, extra shirt, whatever.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G890A using Tapatalk

Sandy of PA
03-22-2016, 09:43
My cosy is also my fleece hat.

flatgrounder
03-22-2016, 09:50
lost my cup ...had to make coffee in zlb .. worked well

colorado_rob
03-22-2016, 10:52
I've been using the FBC thing for years, works great. The only thing is: eating out of a flimsy plastic bag is a bit clumsy. A few years ago I "discovered" that a 1-quart, store brand plastic food container (it's like a UL Tupperware container) works great for placing your bag-O-food in while eating out of the bag. It nicely supports the bag making eating a bit easier. I also use them for my morning cereal (also in a bag, nor-freezer). They also act like a bit of a cozy, keeping your food a bit warmer than just laying in the ground.

They weigh 1.0 ounce without the lid (no need for the lid) and cost about $3 for a four pack. One container last a long time, forever really, but they come in 4-packs. This is a similar product, though mine are store-brand (Krogers) and 1 quart:

https://ziploc.com/en/products/containers/square/containers-medium-square

DuneElliot
03-22-2016, 10:59
Made my cozy out of reflectix...super light and I made it to fit around my cook pot to save space. Everything else, including fuel, sits inside my pot. Using a beanie is fine if you're not wearing it, but if a bag leaks then you have a wet and stinky hat!

lonehiker
03-22-2016, 11:13
I use the flimsy bread/storage bags (not zip-lock bags) and have had none leak. I have "cooked" several hundred meals this way. I store them in my cozy so that sharp-cornered bags don't puncture them. The guy that showed me theses bags had one get punctured this way.

I do use freezer bag zip-locks for pre-measured meals made at home.

Puddlefish
03-22-2016, 12:43
I use the Home 360 storage bags (store brand for a few major grocery chains), which are a bit thicker than a sandwich bag, and a bit thinner than a freezer bag. Cheap, doesn't melt, the seams don't rip.

I made cozy out of a cut down/re-sewn insulated lunch bag. I guess I could use my hat, but I usually manage to spill a bit, and the cozy cleans up well. There is a bit of melty adhesion between the plastic bag and the plastic lining of the the cozy, however it always peels apart without damage.

perdidochas
03-22-2016, 12:46
I heard someone recommend putting food in Zip Lock Freezer bags and pouring boiling water on top of the food and eating out of the Zip Lock Bag. I would think that boiling water could melt a Zip Lock bag or leach out chemicals... maybe I am wrong. Has anyone tried that or recommend it???

I would prefer not taking a bowl because of the extra space, weight, and cleaning involved. I like the idea of the Zip Lock bags but I am not sure if it is safe.

Boiling water won't melt a ziplock, it may leach out chemicals.

lonehiker
03-22-2016, 13:08
Boiling water won't melt a ziplock, it may leach out chemicals.

The next 20 posts will be hysterical posts about how we are all going to die. From the paranoid crowd...

Puddlefish
03-22-2016, 13:38
The next 20 posts will be hysterical posts about how we are all going to die. From the paranoid crowd...

You aren't planning on dying? Sounds kind of boring long term.

atraildreamer
03-22-2016, 16:04
Ask Sarah:

http://www.trailcooking.com/

fabianscorpio
03-23-2016, 10:20
I just posted...Trail Dinners on the Cheap.....check it out...I use freezer bags! They work great!

Another Kevin
03-26-2016, 16:43
Freezer bags are actually tested - or at least the material they're made from is - for chemical leaching with boiling water. It's a pretty common and forseeable scenario to take boiling-hot food from off the kitchen stove and dump it into a bag for storage, and plastics approved for food contact have to meet FDA standards for that.

If you don't think the FDA is strict enough, well, I don't know beyond that. Polyethylene is pretty inert, chemically. I don't know a lot about the plasticizers. Plastic bags don't have very many additives - the herbs and spices are expensive.

shaggymatt
03-31-2016, 07:48
To remove the wondering about safety factor, I've moved to the oven/crock pot bags. They're rated for up to 400 degrees I believe it is. I bought some on Amazon, 10 pack was around $4, IIRC.

Ziploc brand baggies are BPA free, which would by my primary concern since the chemical components of BPA are released above a certain temperature.

BPA *IS* in products labeled with the number 3, 6 and 7 recycling code.

Research seems to vary widely on this... One site I saw said the plastic must be subjected to 212+ degrees for 6+ hours. So it's probably all a moot point when using a freezer baggie, exposed to the boiling point for a short period of time.

lonehiker
03-31-2016, 09:55
Research seems to vary widely on this... One site I saw said the plastic must be subjected to 212+ degrees for 6+ hours. So it's probably all a moot point when using a freezer baggie, exposed to the boiling point for a short period of time.

Just to reinforce this point. Water boils at 212d at sea level. How many points, say on the AT, are at sea level. Additionally, as soon as you remove pot from flame the temperature begins to decline. So from a realistic standpoint your bag is never subjugated to water at 212d.

jigsaw
04-07-2016, 20:20
Boiling water won't melt a ziplock, it may leach out chemicals.

boiling water will melt ziplock bags. I switched to food saver bags and have had zero leaks

Deacon
04-08-2016, 11:30
boiling water will melt ziplock bags. I switched to food saver bags and have had zero leaks

The water hits the food first when poured into the bag, which in turn quickly reduces the water temp. below 212. And as noted above, is it likely to boil at 212.

Miel
04-08-2016, 18:28
Not so many years ago I had a plastic spoon melt while I was stirring hot coffee. Since then I've hesitated to use plastic with hot dishes unless the food manufacturer guarantees the safety (boil-in-bag foods, etc.) How within the past 10 years could plastic still be melting in a hot beverage? Anyway, I'm nervous about it. (As always for any trip where I'm not eating in restaurants for every meal, will be packing my own cutlery, but except for HawkVittles and boil-in-bags, I hesitate. Any sweet, comforting thoughts about this would be much appreciated.)

Lone Wolf
04-08-2016, 18:31
They [Ziploc] do not recommend using any ZIPLOCŪ brand Bag in boiling water, or to “boil” in the microwave. ZIPLOCŪ brand Bags are made from polyethylene plastic with a softening point of approximately 195 degrees Fahrenheit.Dec 16, 2011

Another Kevin
04-08-2016, 18:37
They [Ziploc] do not recommend using any ZIPLOCŪ brand Bag in boiling water, or to “boil” in the microwave. ZIPLOCŪ brand Bags are made from polyethylene plastic with a softening point of approximately 195 degrees Fahrenheit.Dec 16, 2011

Dumping boiling water into dehydrated food to reconstitute it is going to drop the temp below 195 pretty much instantly. Boiling in the bag isn't good, but I'm not too afraid of pouring the hot water into it. I haven't noticed the shrink lines that would come with significant softening.

Remember, pouring hot food off the stovetop into a freezer bag is a scenario that they consider in designing the things.

scrabbler
04-08-2016, 21:18
I've been using the FBC thing for years, works great. The only thing is: eating out of a flimsy plastic bag is a bit clumsy.

Im with you on that, that's why I switch to just boiling the water AND cooking in my IMUSA 12cm mug. Better eating experience. Have to admit though, for messy things, the bag is the way to go.

Deacon
04-09-2016, 07:43
Im with you on that, that's why I switch to just boiling the water AND cooking in my IMUSA 12cm mug. Better eating experience. Have to admit though, for messy things, the bag is the way to go.

A quart size ziploc bag fits perfectly into the 3" diameter screw together plastic cylinder that protects my caldera cone. I found this to be a great solution to handling the flimsy bag.

RumpusParable
04-09-2016, 09:57
Theyve also heavier plastic three-seals bags made for using boiling water in to cook, keep from leaking really well, and they're also stiff enough to put in my front pouch and eat from as I walk without spilling so far. So those are an option.

Obiwan
04-09-2016, 10:12
Been doing it for years...no signs of ....what was I saying???? :-)

Malto
04-09-2016, 15:32
I lucked into a pretty sweet FBC setup. I have an 850ml pot which is the perfect size for a quart freezer bag. Heat water, pour in bag, bag in pot with cozy. When done wrap top of bag around the rim of the pot, cozy holds the bag and keeps food warm while eating.

SoFlo
04-09-2016, 15:54
I lucked into a pretty sweet FBC setup. I have an 850ml pot which is the perfect size for a quart freezer bag. Heat water, pour in bag, bag in pot with cozy. When done wrap top of bag around the rim of the pot, cozy holds the bag and keeps food warm while eating.

Jetboil pots are also the perfect size cozy for freezer bags. Top of bags neatly folder over lip of Jetboil making an instant cozy. Note, the tall Jetboil Flash pots, not the new short fat MiniMo.

Rocket Jones
04-09-2016, 16:05
I cut a small plastic container that held deli meat down to about 2" tall. Holds my FBC bag while I eat and weighs practically zip. I suppose I could use it as a very small sink if needed.

Kestrelchick
04-11-2016, 13:37
silly question maybe for those that are cooking with the freezer bag method - my son and I are planning a thru-hike next March and we had hoped to cook our meals with this method - yesterday we tried some experimenting and not sure if we were just botching everything but only one out of a few things were actually edible....the mashed potato mix with bacon bits was great but when we tried to use any of the things with noodles like Mac and cheese or the lipton sides, we got our water really hot, put the noodles/or side dish in the plastic bag, poured the water over them and put them in a cozy - we tried various times and each time, the noodles or mac/cheese came out super gummy or still hard or gluey....any words of advice?

lonehiker
04-11-2016, 14:30
silly question maybe for those that are cooking with the freezer bag method - my son and I are planning a thru-hike next March and we had hoped to cook our meals with this method - yesterday we tried some experimenting and not sure if we were just botching everything but only one out of a few things were actually edible....the mashed potato mix with bacon bits was great but when we tried to use any of the things with noodles like Mac and cheese or the lipton sides, we got our water really hot, put the noodles/or side dish in the plastic bag, poured the water over them and put them in a cozy - we tried various times and each time, the noodles or mac/cheese came out super gummy or still hard or gluey....any words of advice?

For the pasta items I add a bit more water and stir a couple of times during so that the pasta doesn't glomp together. Experiment with cook/hydration time. I personally have never had any luck with Mac and cheese. I prefer the knorr/Lipton sides that have both rice and pasta as they seem to cook better than the pasta only sides.

lonehiker
04-11-2016, 14:33
Make sure and stir really well when you initially add water to the pasta.

Uncle Joe
04-11-2016, 15:14
I would think cooking hard pasta in this method would be problematic. Ramen works because those noodles are pretty small. Think of how long it takes to cook macaroni in a boiling pot. With FBC you're basically just reconstituting.

Another Kevin
04-11-2016, 18:36
I've never actually had much luck even with reconstituting the Knorr noodle sides - or maybe I just don't like Knorr noodle sides, I haven't tried them by conventional methods at home.

I tend to do pasta things with capelllini, tiny pasta shapes (look for ones that cook in seven minutes or less), or couscous. Those come out all right. Tomato sauce made with Harmony House tomato powder according to their recipe (but more basil, oregano, pepper flakes, garlic...), reconstituted with couscous or cappellini, with abruzzese and string cheese, is pretty darned tasty. Or throw out the 'flavor packet' with ramen and add some sort of homebrew sauce.

SarBar has a lot of good ideas at http://trailcooking.com/ .

SWODaddy
04-11-2016, 19:38
FYI - Dutch's new website has a "Bowl bag" which looks interesting, though you'd probably want to reuse them to be economical.

http://www.makeyourgear.com/food/accessories/bowl-bags/